From The Staff

Exhibit Of The Month: Mental Health Spending On A Global Scale


September 29th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Monthseries. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month’s exhibit, published in the September global health issue of Health Affairs, looks at budget allocation for mental health services by country income level.

In the article, “Policy Actions To Achieve Integrated Community-Based Mental Health Services,” authors Mary DeSilva, Chiara Samele, Shekhar Saxena, Vikram Patel, and Ara Darzi write that “most low-income countries allocate about 0.5 percent of their already small health budgets to the treatment and prevention of mental health problems.” Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


September 26th, 2014

At Healthcare Lighthouse, Billy Wynne provides this week’s “Thank God It’s Recess” edition of the Health Wonk Review. Billy gives us a nice collection of posts, including a Health Affairs Blog post on health insurance reform proposals by Ari Friedman and Siyabonga Ndwandwe. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: CHIP Eligibility Finds Decrease In Uninsurance In Some States


September 24th, 2014

As part of the 2009 reauthorization of the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), states were provided with new resources and options to help reduce uninsurance rates among children. These included: expanded eligibility guidelines; simplified enrollment and renewal procedures; and funding for outreach campaigns. Fifteen states chose to raise their CHIP income eligibility thresholds.

In one of the first studies to analyze the impact of these recent CHIP expansions on the program’s enrollment, published today as a Web First by Health Affairs, authors Ian Goldstein, Deliana Kostova, Jennifer Foltz, and Genevieve Kenney found that “expansion states” saw a 1.1-percentage-point reduction in uninsurance among newly eligible children, cutting this group’s uninsurance rate by nearly 15 percent. The study also discovered that public coverage increased by 2.9 percentage points, revealing a shift among some of these families away from private insurance, and found variable effects across states. Read the rest of this entry »

Global Health Update: High Bed Occupancy Rates And Increased Mortality In Denmark


September 24th, 2014

High levels of bed occupancy are associated with increased inpatient and thirty-day hospital mortality in Denmark, according to research published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

Authors Flemming Madsen, Steen Ladelund, and Allan Linneberg received considerable media attention in Denmark for their research findings. For one major Television channel, it topped Germany’s victory in the World Cup finals.

In another story from the Danish newspaper, Information, Councillor Ulla Astman, Chairman of the North Denmark Regional Council and second highest ranking politician, who runs all of the Danish public hospitals, reportly stated that “we have to live with it [the increased mortality],” since Denmark cannot afford to reduce bed occupancy.

“Or die with it,” said lead author Madsen, a pulmonary physician and director of the Allergy and Lung Clinic in Helsingør, Denmark, at the July 9 Health Affairs briefing, “Using Big Data To Transform Care.” Madsen, who left his position as director of the Department of Internal Medicine at Frederiksberg Hospital in Copenhagen to pursue this research, believes that Astman’s statement explains why Denmark has a bed shortage problem and supports his argument that bed shortage is a result of planning.

“It is dangerous to focus on productivity without looking at the consequences,” says Madsen. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Briefing: Specialty Pharmaceuticals Spending And Policy


September 23rd, 2014

We live in an era of specialty pharmaceuticals — drugs typically used to treat chronic, serious or life threatening conditions such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, growth hormone deficiency, and multiple sclerosis.  Their cost is often much higher than traditional drugs, and they are set to account for more than half of all drug spending by the end of this decade.

The October 2014 edition of Health Affairs, “Specialty Pharmaceutical Spending and Policy,” contains a cluster of articles examining the host of issues related to specialty pharmaceuticals: from the promise they hold for curing or managing chronic diseases, to the risk they pose for exacerbating health care costs and disparities, and the challenges they present for policymakers striving to balance both.

WHEN: 
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

WHERE: 
Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC, Lower Level

REGISTER NOW!

Follow Live Tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_SpecialtyDrugs.

Health Affairs is grateful to CVS Health for its financial support of the issue and event. Read the rest of this entry »

New Health Policy Brief: Employee Choice


September 18th, 2014

A new Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) looks at health coverage choice for employees of small businesses. Unlike large organizations, small businesses have been less likely to provide comprehensive health insurance or a choice of plans, and their employees are more likely to be uninsured or underinsured.

To address this insurance gap, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) created the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP) Marketplaces in each state. (Note: The SHOP exchange was the subject of an earlier Health Policy Brief.) These Marketplaces (eighteen run by state exchanges, thirty-three by the federal government) will provide “one stop shopping,” for small businesses to compare health plans and enroll their employees.

To make SHOP Marketplaces more attractive to small businesses, the ACA required SHOP Marketplaces to offer a feature known as employee choice, in which employers can offer their employees a choice from multiple health insurance plans. While the majority of state-based SHOP Marketplaces have chosen to offer access to multiple plans, employee choice will not be mandatory until 2016. This Health Policy Brief examines the issue of employee choice, the status of its implementation, and whether the concept is successfully attracting more small businesses to offer coverage through SHOP Marketplaces. Read the rest of this entry »

Narrative Matters: When The System Fails The Intertwined Needs Of Caregiver And Patient


September 15th, 2014

In the September Health Affairs Narrative Matters essay, when a family caregiver becomes injured, she learns the difficulties—and costs—of caring for herself and her chronically ill husband at the same time. Suzanne Geffen Mintz’s article is freely available to all readers, or you can listen to the podcast. Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


September 12th, 2014

At Health Business Blog, David Williams is not ashamed to be a wonk in his September 11 edition of the Health Wonk Review. David highlights many great posts, including “The 125 Percent Solution,” suggested by Jonathan Skinner, Elliott Fisher, and James Weinstein on Health Affairs Blog, which would give consumers and insurers the option of paying 125 percent of the Medicare price for any health care service.  Read the rest of this entry »

ACOs, Bundled Payment Lead Health Affairs Blog August Most-Read List


September 12th, 2014

Posts on payment and delivery reform head the Health Affairs Blog top-fifteen list for August. Suzanne Delbanco and David Lansky’s post on accountable care organizations was the most-read post, followed by Tom Williams and Jill Yegian’s post on bundled payment, written in response to an article published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

Next is Health Affairs’ Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil’s post on the five engagements that will define the future of health, drawn from his keynote presentation at the 2014 Colorado Health Symposium. This is followed by Rosemarie Day and coauthors’ post on the private health insurance exchange system.

The full list is below. Read the rest of this entry »

New Health Policy Brief: Drug Shortages


September 11th, 2014

A new Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) looks at the ongoing problem of drug shortages in the United States. From 2005 to 2010, the number of reported drug shortages almost tripled.

Today, newly reported drug shortages overall are decreasing, but the total amount of drug shortages continues to increase, reflecting just how long it can take to rectify a shortage. Generic sterile injectable drugs, a vital component for patients fighting cancer, combatting an infection, or about to undergo surgery, are in especially short supply.

One of the most cited reasons for generic sterile injectable drug shortages is low reimbursement rates from Medicare Part B that came about after a change in law in 2003. These changes incentivized both physicians and manufacturers to switch to higher-cost drugs, reducing investment in cheaper generic drugs and causing “growing market concentration,” and eventual drug shortages. Read the rest of this entry »

Contributing Voices

Implementing Health Reform: Judge Rules Against Premium Tax Credits In ACA Federal Exchanges


September 30th, 2014

On September 30, 2014, Judge Ronald White of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma decided in Pruitt v. Burwell and Lew that the Affordable Care Act does not authorize the federally exchanges to issue premium tax credits.  He held that the Internal Revenue Service rule that provided the contrary is invalid.  Judge White’s decision followed the opinion of the majority of a panel of the District of Columbia circuit’s decision in Halbig v. Burwell, although the judgment in that case has been vacated pending a rehearing of the case by the full D.C. Circuit.  His decision was contrary to the decision of the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals upholding the IRS rule in King v. Burwell.  The district courts in both Halbig and King had upheld the IRS rule.

The Pruitt case has a long and circuitous history.  It was originally filed by Oklahoma attorney general Scott Pruitt in 2011 as an individual mandate challenge.  After the Supreme Court upheld the individual mandate in 2012, Attorney General Pruitt amended his complaint to instead challenge the ability of the federally facilitated exchanges to issue premium tax credits.  In an earlier ruling, Judge White refused to allow Oklahoma to sue on its own behalf as a state (a ruling that Judge White did not change in this decision), but concluded that it might have standing to proceed as a large employer.

In his September 30 ruling, Judge White concluded that Oklahoma did in fact have standing to sue as a large employer.  Under the ACA’s employer responsibility provisions, a large employer that does not offer its employees affordable and adequate coverage can be subject to a tax penalty if one or more of its employees receives premium tax credits through the exchange.  If the federally facilitated exchange, which is the ACA exchange in Oklahoma, is unable to grant premium tax credits, Oklahoma, which is a large employer, cannot be subject to a penalty if it fails to offer coverage to its employees. Read the rest of this entry »

An Interview With George Halvorson: The Kaiser Permanente Renaissance, And Health Reform’s Unfinished Business


September 30th, 2014

For decades, health policymakers considered Kaiser Permanente the lode star of delivery system reform.  Yet by the end of 1999, the nation’s oldest and largest group model HMO had experienced almost three years of significant operating losses, the first in the plan’s history. It was struggling to implement a functional electronic health record, and had a reputation for inconsistent customer service.  But most seriously, it faced deep divisions between management and the leadership of its powerful Permanente Federation, which represents Kaiser’s more than 17,000 physicians, over both strategic direction and operations of the plan.

Against this backdrop, Kaiser surprised the health plan community by announcing in March 2002 the selection of a non-physician, George Halvorson, as its new CEO.  Halvorson had spent most of his career in the Twin Cities, most recently as CEO of HealthPartners, a successful mixed model health plan.  Halvorson’s reputation was as a product innovator; he not only developed a prototype of the consumer-directed health plan in the mid-1990’s, but also population health improvement objectives for its membership, both firsts in the industry.

During his twelve year tenure as CEO, Halvorson not only guided the plan to solid profitability, but added a million members in California, its largest market, despite a devastating recession and a national retreat of commercial HMO membership.  He invested over $6 billion in computerized patient care systems and population health management infrastructure, healed the breach with Kaiser’s physicians, and markedly increased its consumer satisfaction scores, earning 5 STAR ratings under Medicare Advantage.  He left the organization at the end of 2013 with more than $53 billion in revenues and more than $19 billion in reserves and investments.

This interview covers Halvorson’s time at Kaiser, his views of health reform, including the unfinished reform agenda, and his public health activism.  It was conducted by Jeff Goldsmith, a veteran health industry analyst, and Associate Professor of Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia.  Jeff is a member of the editorial board of Health Affairs. Read the rest of this entry »

The Payment Reform Landscape: Value-Oriented Payment Jumps, And Yet …


September 30th, 2014

Today, Catalyst for Payment Reform (CPR) unveiled some potentially exciting news: Our 2014 National Scorecard on Payment Reform tells us 40 percent of commercial sector payments to doctors and hospitals now flow through value-oriented payment methods, defined as payment methods designed to improve quality and reduce waste.  This is a dramatic increase since 2013 when the figure was just 11 percent.

Traditional fee-for-service, where we pay for every test and procedure regardless of its value, may rapidly be becoming a relic.  While the Scorecard findings are not wholly representative of health plans across the United States, they are directionally sound and allow us to measure progress toward value-oriented payment in the commercial sector.  (Scorecard findings are based on data representing almost 65 percent of commercial health plans across the country.)

On the face of it, this is thrilling news for CPR, especially since our organizational goal is that at least 20 percent of payments to doctors and hospitals will flow through methods proven to improve value by the year 2020.  But we are not closing up shop just yet.  The proliferation of value-based payment arrangements only matters if they succeed at reducing costs and improving the quality of care. And for many value-oriented payment models, we still don’t have the evidence.

We also remain a bit circumspect because only about half of the value-oriented payments (out of that 40 percent figure) put providers at some financial risk if they fail to improve care or spend over budget.  To employers and others helping to foot the bill for health care, many new payment methods often feel like “cost plus arrangements.”  Instead, purchasers would like to see risk sharing across payers and providers. Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Excepted Benefits Final Rule


September 29th, 2014

Congress adopted Title I of the Affordable Care Act to increase access to health coverage for individuals by reforming employer group health coverage and health insurance offered to individuals and groups, requiring large employers to offer their employees affordable minimum health coverage or pay a penalty, imposing a penalty on individuals who can afford health coverage but fail to obtain it, and offering advance premium tax credits through the exchanges to individuals who cannot otherwise afford to purchase health coverage.

Coverage has long been available both through groups and for individuals that provides some health-related benefits but is neither a group health plan nor insured health coverage, as those terms are defined in the ACA.  These benefits were originally labeled by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 as “excepted benefits,” because they are excepted from the forms of benefits regulated initially by HIPAA and now by the ACA.

On September 26, 2014 the Internal Revenue Service, Department of Labor, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“the agencies”) issued regulations expanding access to excepted benefits through insured and self-insured groups. Read the rest of this entry »

Whose Costs Are Saved When Palliative Care Saves Costs?


September 29th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a periodic Health Affairs Blog series on palliative care, health policy, and health reform. The series features essays adapted from and drawing on the volume, Meeting the Needs of Older Adults with Serious Illness: Challenges and Opportunities in the Age of Health Care Reform, in which clinicians, researchers and policy leaders address 16 key areas where real-world policy options to improve access to quality palliative care could have a substantial role in improving value.

As is well-known to most readers of Health Affairs, specialist palliative care is, and has always been, about helping seriously ill patients and families determine what matters most to them, and then helping them achieve their goals. Research demonstrates the beneficial impact of palliative care services on quality of life, survival, family caregiver outcomes, and symptom burden.

As an epiphenomenon or side-effect of the improved quality resulting from these models, multiple studies demonstrate lower intensity and costs of health care. Palliative care can make enormous contributions to health care value because by improving patient- and family-centered outcomes, it leads directly to reduced costs, for both payers and providers. Read the rest of this entry »

How Engaging Patients Can Improve Care And Health Outcomes


September 26th, 2014

Patients and caregivers are gaining momentum as powerful new resources in efforts to improve the health care system. They are increasingly becoming active partners in their own care, as well as seeking to make the health care delivery system more responsive to their needs and easier to navigate. And they are increasingly engaging as collaborators in planning and conducting research, and disseminating its results, with the goal of producing evidence that can help patients and those who care for them make better-informed decisions about the clinical choices they face.

It is this last trend that led the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to support Health Affairs in developing a series of videos illustrating some of the ways that patients are bringing their unique experiences and community connections to efforts to improve care for themselves and others. This includes stories of how patients are becoming partners in research designed to address the outcomes important to them, taking account of their own concerns and circumstances.

Seen through this lens, being a research partner goes well beyond being the subject of a trial. Rather, it means helping to guide researchers in formulating the questions to be studied, making the right clinical comparisons, looking at appropriate populations, and focusing on the outcomes important to patients. This should greatly increase the chance that the research findings will produce relevant results that can have a real-world impact — something we plan to evaluate carefully over time.

Meaningful patient engagement is at the heart of PCORI’s approach to research, and several of the patients featured in the videos have in fact partnered with researchers in just this way in patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) studies we fund. They recognize that PCOR, a form of comparative clinical effectiveness research that focuses on issues of concern to patients, is a vital building block for developing truly patient-centered care and health policy, more effective treatments, and better outcomes.

In the following sections, we highlight the projects mentioned in the videos to give you an idea of how patients and community members are partnering in research projects. Read the rest of this entry »

Engaging Patients: Interviews With Patients, Providers, And Communities Across The Country


September 25th, 2014

As the Affordable Care Act (ACA) reaches deeper into the daily lives of Americans, one impact is sure to hit home. The ACA encourages patients and providers to become more active partners in making the crucial strategic decisions over improving individual health. Three new videos, produced in partnership with Health Affairs and the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), show how people all over the United States are learning that involving patients – teaching them, soliciting their input, and communicating with family-members and other caregivers right from the start – can result in better, more efficient health care outcomes.

There is growing evidence that patients, once engaged, take better care of themselves. They’re more likely to monitor their own health, take their medicines, and communicate more thoroughly with their care providers. They have a better understanding of the treatment strategy. And they are more likely to participate in clinical studies or other research to find better, more efficient treatments.

I was privileged to report on and host these videos on the new era of patient engagement. I interviewed nearly two dozen people across the country – patients, doctors, researchers, care-providers, academics and community activists – all of whom have inspiring stories to tell about the benefits of focusing on patient centered outcomes. Time constraints meant that many of their important points landed on the cutting-room floor during the video editing process. It’s another privilege to be able to offer some of those additional insights in this blog. Read the rest of this entry »

An Evolving Approach To Collaborations Among Health And Other Sectors


September 25th, 2014

Much evidence exists on the potential for prevention and health promotion to decrease the burden of chronic diseases. The Institute of Medicine (IOM), for example, has issued many reports with recommendations to use population-based and individual prevention programs and policy and legal interventions to improve diets, increase physical activity, and stop tobacco use.

These reports also note that achieving progress in health promotion will require the engagement of other non-health sectors. This isn’t breaking news—terms like “multisectoral” or “health in all policies” prevail in public health dialogue. Yet the question remains – if it is so well accepted that the health sector alone cannot improve health, why don’t multisectoral programs and policies happen more often and more successfully? Read the rest of this entry »

IOM Report Calls For Transformation Of Care For The Seriously Ill


September 24th, 2014

The new Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on care near the end of life in the United States was released last week. I had the privilege of serving on the Committee for the last two years, involved both in the writing of the report itself and in coming to consensus on its recommendations.

The name of the report and the charge to the Committee from the IOM was focused on “end of life.” However, the title, “Dying in America,” is something of a misnomer. The report itself focuses extensively on people with serious and chronic illness with indeterminate prognoses, why the current health care system fails so consistently to meet their needs, and what must change to improve the situation.

Hospice is the gold standard of care quality for those that are predictably dying and clearly at the end of life, and we are fortunate as a nation to have such a strong (mostly home) hospice infrastructure, but that’s not where most of the problems lie. The problems lie in the lack of options for people who are either not hospice-eligible (prognosis uncertain or continuing to want and benefit from disease treatment) or are referred to hospice much too late in their disease course to influence their experience and their families’.

The new report builds on the 1998 IOM report “Approaching Death” and goes well beyond the usual nostrums of calling for reimbursement for advance care planning and decrying all the “waste” in health care spending during the last year of life. Read the rest of this entry »

Reconceptualizing Health and Health Care: Why Our Cancer Care Delivery System Is In Crisis


September 23rd, 2014

Cancer Care System in Crisis

Americans fear cancer. In a poll for MetLife, when participants were asked which major disease they feared most, 41 percent said cancer, 31 percent said Alzheimer’s disease, and small percentages of other respondents said other diseases. Not surprisingly, The National Institutes of Health has a budget allocation of $4.9 billion for 2014 to The National Cancer Institute, far more than any other Institute and over 25 percent of the NIH’s total funding to study organ-based diseases ($19.2 billion).

Despite this longstanding commitment to cancer research, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) reported in September 2013 that America’s cancer care delivery system is “in crisis.” The IOM determined that physicians ask for patients’ preferences in medical decisions only 50 percent of the time and that 25 percent of patients report that their clinicians fail to share important information, such as test results or medical history, with other care providers.

Of bankruptcies in the U.S., 33 percent are related to medical concerns, and many people are referring to the astounding cost of cancer therapies as another “toxicity” of the disease. Patients are too often prescribed cancer treatments that can cost double the conventional treatment options but have no evidence-based incremental benefits. Read the rest of this entry »

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