From The Staff

Health Affairs Web First: Vietnam’s Health Care System, Explained By Its Minister Of Health


October 30th, 2014

In August, Vietnam’s Minister of Health, Nguyen Thi Kim Tien, was interviewed for Health Affairs by Tsung-Mei Cheng, recently released as a Health Affairs Web First.

Among the topics discussed was an overview of the unique characteristics of Vietnam’s health system; its strengths and weaknesses; health financing reform aimed at reaching the goal of universal health coverage; the prevention and control of infectious diseases; and how Vietnam has performed in achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

Cheng is a health policy research analyst at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, in New Jersey. Health Affairs has previously published Cheng’s interviews with other world health ministers, including Thomas Zeltner of Switzerland (2010) and Chen Zhu of China (2012). Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Briefing: Collaborating For Community Health


October 29th, 2014

Policymakers are paying increasing attention to the relationship between the characteristics of communities and the health of the people living in them. The November 2014 issue of Health Affairs, “Collaborating For Community Health,” examines new possibilities created by alignment of the fields of health and community development.

These possibilities come from both sides, including recent changes in the community development field that have set the stage for the new focus on improving health, as well as new approaches to health care financing that create incentives for improving health outcomes.

You are invited to join us on Wednesday, November 5, at a forum featuring authors from the new issue at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

WHEN:
Wednesday, November 5, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

WHERE:
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC, 13th Floor

REGISTER NOW!

Follow live Tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_CommunityHealth. Read the rest of this entry »

Exhibit Of The Month: Comparing The Cost And Value Of Specialty And Traditional Drugs


October 27th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Monthseries. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month’s exhibits, from the article, “Despite High Costs, Specialty Drugs May Offer Value For Money Comparable To That Of Traditional Drugs,” published in the October issue of Health Affairs, compare the value and costs of specialty and traditional drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration from 1999-2011. Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


October 24th, 2014

Louise Norris at Colorado Health Insurance Insider provides this week’s “falling leaves” edition of the Health Wonk Review. Jennifer’s insightful read includes a Health Affairs Blog post from J. Stephen Morrison on the U.S. Ebola response and the role of CDC head Thomas Friedan. Read the rest of this entry »

Narrative Matters: Sensitizing Doctors To Patients With Disabilities


October 23rd, 2014

In the October Health Affairs Narrative Matters essay, a doctor who stutters confronts the stigma against patients—and providers—with disabilities. Leana Wen’s article is freely available to all readers, or you can listen to the podcast. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: Noneconomic Damage Caps Reduced Medical Malpractice Payments, With Varied Effects


October 22nd, 2014

With the 2014 election weeks away, a provision of California’s Proposition 46, raising the cap on medical malpractice payments for noneconomic damages, has been in the news. This provision would increase the payment cap from $250,000 to $1.1 million. A new study, being released today by Health Affairs as a Web First, sheds light on the potential effect of this proposition.

Study authors Seth A. Seabury, Eric Helland, and Anupam B. Jena looked at the impact of medical malpractice reforms on the average size of malpractice payments in several physician specialties and compared how the effects differed according to the size of the cap. It found that caps reduced the average payments by 15 percent compared to no cap—and a $250,000 cap reduced average payments by 20 percent.

On the other hand, a less restrictive $500,000 cap had no significant effect. The authors also found specialty variations, with the largest impact involving pediatricians and the smallest for claims of surgical subspecialties and ophthalmologists. Read the rest of this entry »

Resources Don’t Solve Design Flaws


October 21st, 2014

The first three sessions of a conference I recently attended tackled some complex and important questions: How do we extend health insurance to people such as migrant and informal workers who don’t fit neatly into mainstream coverage programs? As we increase our investment in primary care, how do we assure that the performance of the primary care system is at the highest possible level? What types of evidence should we use as we make decisions in a dynamic health care system with limited opportunities for “gold standard” randomized controlled trials?

These are excellent questions, and they were perfect topics for a cutting-edge conference discussing the challenges facing the U.S. health care system.

But this conference was not about the U.S. health care system. These were opening “satellite” sessions at the Third Global Symposium on Health Systems Research held in Cape Town, South Africa. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Policy Brief: The Ninety-Day Grace Period


October 17th, 2014

A new Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) examines the ninety-day grace period, a provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Of the eight million people who enrolled in the insurance Marketplaces between October 2013 and March 2014, 85 percent received an advance premium tax credit. This provision allows a three-month grace period for nonpayment of insurance premiums for this group of consumers–and this group only–if they have previously paid at least one month’s full premium in that benefit year.

This grace period allows these new enrollees continuity of care, preventing them from shifting or “churning” in and out of coverage for nonpayment. Health care providers, however, have expressed concerns that this provision and the way the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has implemented it could expose them to considerable financial risk. This Health Policy Brief focuses on how this provision is being implemented and the concerns from the provider community. Read the rest of this entry »

Gordon And Betty Moore Foundation Names Harvey V. Fineberg Its New President


October 13th, 2014

Health Affairs was delighted to read today’s announcement that Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg will become the next president of The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, effective January 1, 2015. Until recently, Dr. Fineberg was president of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), serving two consecutive terms from 2002-2014. From 1997 to 2001, he served as Provost of Harvard University, and prior to that for 13 years as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health.

Health Affairs has strong ties to both Fineberg and The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. This summer, I interviewed Fineberg about his tenure at the IOM; the audio recording of that wide-ranging conversation is available as a Health Affairs podcast.   Read the rest of this entry »

Posts On ACA Tax Forms, Replacement Plan Lead September Health Affairs Blog Top-Ten List


October 10th, 2014

Tim Jost’s post on complicated Affordable Care Act (ACA) tax forms and his review of Avik Roy’s ACA replacement plan were the most-read Health Affairs Blog posts for September. These were followed by a CVS Health post from Troyen Brennan and coauthors on rethinking the sale of tobacco products in pharmacies and a post on bundled payments and innovation from Rebecca Paradis of the Network for Excellence in Health Innovation.

The full list is below. Read the rest of this entry »

Contributing Voices

The United States’ Misguided Self-Interest On Ebola


October 31st, 2014

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is spiraling out of control. The international community allowed a manageable outbreak to mushroom into a health and humanitarian crisis. The World Health Organization (WHO) has been enfeebled and largely sidelined. Belatedly, the United States sent military troops into Liberia and spearheaded a United Nations Security Council resolution. Yet since isolated Ebola cases have appeared on our shores, the US has begun to look inward, at risk of falling into a trap that I will call “misguided self-interest.”

While the West African epidemic rages, the US delayed significant action until long after the unprecedented nature of the Ebola epidemic became clear, and even now the response is incommensurate with the massive need. Now we are transferring our gaze from the real crisis and headed on an insular journey.

I grant the premise that a country’s first responsibility is to protect its inhabitants. But calls for a travel ban from the region and newly announced state quarantine policies that would ensnare travelers from affected countries appear selfish. To put it in perspective, the US has experienced only a few domestically diagnosed cases, with an exceedingly low risk of an outbreak. Read the rest of this entry »

Bringing Health, Wellness, And Opportunity To Coal Country


October 31st, 2014

Editor’s Note: This post is part of an ongoing series written for Health Affairs Blog by local leaders from communities honored with the annual Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Prize. In 2014, six winning communities were selected by RWJF from more than 250 applicants and celebrated for placing a priority on health and creating powerful partnerships to drive change.

A small Appalachian coal mining town might seem like an unlikely place for a contemporary community health revolution, but Williamson, WV can proudly claim that achievement. As a city of 3,098 people along the banks of the Tug Fork River, Williamson has a long history of defying expectations. In the late 19th and early 20th century, it became the center of a cultural renaissance that began when the Norfolk and Western Railway brought people from all over the United States to Mingo County (Williamson is the county seat).

This diverse group of entrepreneurs and miners turned Williamson into a sophisticated urban center that became the “heart” of America’s billion-dollar-coal-field. They created an infrastructure that survived three great floods and today is part of a network of facilities that are being used for renewed development through the Sustainable Williamson project — a six-part initiative designed to bring better health and economic opportunity to a region faced with daunting financial and public health challenges.

Read the rest of this entry »

Learning From Missed Opportunities To Diagnose US Ebola Patient Zero


October 30th, 2014

Over a century ago American physician Richard Cabot wrote about misdiagnoses, recognizing: “A goodly number of ‘classic’ time-honored mistakes in diagnosis are familiar to all experienced physicians because we make them again and again. Some of these we can avoid; others are almost inevitable, but all should be borne in mind and marked on medical maps by a danger-signal of some kind: ‘In this vicinity look out for hidden rocks,’ or ‘Dangerous turn here, run slow.’”

Ironically, despite the dramatic changes in the nature of medical practice over the last 100 years, Cabot’s words ring more true than ever today. This has become especially clear in the last few weeks since Ebola first touched US shores, uncovering one of the biggest ongoing vulnerabilities of outpatient medicine – misdiagnosis. Read the rest of this entry »

North Carolina Dental Board v. FTC: A Bright Line On Whiter Teeth?


October 30th, 2014

On October 14, 2014, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments in North Carolina Board of Dental Examiners vs. Federal Trade Commission.  The case does not involve the Affordable Care Act, but it goes to the heart of the professional self-regulatory paradigm that has governed the U.S. health care system for more than a century.  The specific legal question under review is the standard for determining when a state professional licensing board’s activities are subject to scrutiny for anticompetitive effect under the federal antitrust laws.

Antitrust law applies to private anticompetitive conduct.  Congress did not intend to interfere with state regulation that limits or even eliminates competitions.  As long as states do so using public agencies and officials, they are on safe ground.  If a state empowers private parties to administer such regulation, however, it not only must “clearly articulate” its intent to diminish competition, but also must “actively supervise” the conduct of the private parties.  In previous cases, the Supreme Court developed and elaborated this two-part test, which is called the “state action doctrine.” Read the rest of this entry »

Poverty’s Association With Poor Health Outcomes and Health Disparities


October 30th, 2014

A recent ecological study by Carl Stevens, David Schriger, Brian Raffetto, Anna Davis, David Zingmond, and Dylan H. Roby, published in the August issue of Health Affairs, showed significant associations between neighborhood poverty and diabetes-related lower extremity amputations (LEA) in the state of California, which adds to the growing evidence that where you live (not just how you live) may directly impact your health.

The authors linked data from multiple sources (i.e. California Health Information Survey, Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, health facility discharge data) and used geographic information system (GIS) analyses and regression analyses to identify amputation “hot spots” and uncovered a 10-fold variation in LEA rates between low-income and high-income neighborhoods. Read the rest of this entry »

Grand-Aides And Health Policy: Reducing Readmissions Cost-Effectively


October 29th, 2014

Hospital readmissions for the same condition within 30 days likely should not occur, and most often indicate system failure. Readmitted patients are either discharged too early, should be placed into palliative care or hospice, or most often are victims of a failure in transition of care from hospital to home. Most hospitals and physicians would like to eliminate such readmissions, particularly now that payers like Medicare are penalizing hospitals for high rates of readmission. Numerous approaches have been tried to reduce readmissions, with recent published improvements between a 2 percent and 26 percent reduction.

The Grand-Aides® program features rigorous training of nurse aides or community health workers to work as nurse extenders, 5 Grand-Aides to one RN or nurse practitioner (NP) supervisor, with approximately 50 patients per Grand-Aide per year. The Grand-Aides visit at home daily for the first 5 days post-discharge and then as ordered by the supervisor (e.g. 3 days the next week) for at least 30 days, extending as long as desired.

The post-discharge protocol for Grand-Aides includes the following: Read the rest of this entry »

Ebola And EHRs: An Unfortunate And Critical Reminder


October 28th, 2014

The Dallas hospital communication lapse that led to the discharge of a Liberian man with Ebola symptoms is an example of the failure of the American health care system to effectively share health information, even within single institutions. It is not possible to know whether a faster response would have saved Thomas Eric Duncan’s life or reduced risk to the community and health workers.

What is clear is that rapid sharing of information is one of the elements critical to halting the spread of Ebola. Had all members of the initial care team known of the patient’s recent arrival from an Ebola-stricken country and acted appropriately to quarantine Mr. Duncan, this would have limited the chance of exposing the public and enabled faster preventive protocols for treating personnel. Read the rest of this entry »

Lessons from Ebola: The Infectious Disease Era, And The Need To Prepare, Will Never Be Over


October 28th, 2014

With the wall-to-wall news coverage of Ebola recently, it’s hard for many to distinguish fact from fiction and to really understand the risk the disease poses and how prepared we are to fight it.

Fighting infectious diseases requires constant vigilance. Along with Ebola, health officials around the globe are closely watching other emerging threats: MERS-CoV, pandemic flu strains, Marburg, Chikungunya and Enterovirus D68. The best defense to all of these threats is a good offense — detecting, treating and containing as quickly and effectively as possible.

And yet, we have consistently degraded our ability to respond to these new, emerging and re-emerging threats by underfunding and undercutting existing capabilities and expecting the country to ramp up overnight when new threats emerge. Read the rest of this entry »

Adult Conversation On High-Priced Drugs? Don’t Hold Your Breath (But Hang In There) …


October 27th, 2014

The benevolent identity of the health care enterprise tends to moderate disagreements and keep them under a big tent of shared goals. In the case of very high prices for powerful new drugs, however, the commons gets stretched painfully thin. Drug companies which see themselves as pioneers are accused of being merely greedy. Cost-conscious payers and regulators are impugned for depriving patients of life-conserving treatment breakthroughs. A divisive political undercurrent often threatens to obtrude. Altogether, a tough environment for rational policy assessment.

Credit is due, accordingly, to the Brookings Institution, for putting a wide array of views on display at its October 1 forum on “the cost and value of biomedical innovation,” which was jointly sponsored by the Schaeffer Center at the University of Southern California. With the head of Gilead Sciences at one pole of the discussion and a leading generics industry attorney at the other, the discussion didn’t lack for strongly-held views, strongly stated.

But the tone was civil, a lot of useful information was exchanged, and the audience went away carrying a meta-message about the importance of maintaining an “adult conversation” on a subject of such obvious importance and difficulty. Read the rest of this entry »

Study Draws Misleading Conclusions Regarding 340B Program


October 23rd, 2014

After reading Rena Conti and Peter Bach’s recent study on hospitals’ purported misuse of the 340B Drug Discount Program, published in the October issue of Health Affairs, I had two questions: first, how are the authors substantiating their conclusions? Second, what kind of sensational sound bites are going to come from this?

These are the questions that responsible researchers must ask themselves so there is not a false representation of what they did, what they found, and how the actual findings compare to their research intentions. Researchers have to be equally precise in both their statistical analysis AND in the discussion of the results.

I was tempted to run through several counterpoints that my 15 years of 340B policy and research experience yields, but was tempered by both the word count limitations on a blog post and the straightforwardness of my main objection. Simply put, the authors’ conclusions are not substantiated by the data collected. Conti and Bach say that they “found” that hospitals “served communities that were wealthier and had higher rates of insurance” and “generated profits.” They did not find this. Read the rest of this entry »

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