From The Staff

Look At Consequences Of Rejecting Medicaid Expansion Leads First Quarter Health Affairs Blog Most-Read List


April 14th, 2014
by Tracy Gnadinger

Given their recent mention in Paul Krugman’s New York Times‘ column, it’s not surprising that Sam Dickman, David Himmelstein, Danny McCormick, and Steffie Woolhandler‘s discussion of the health and financial impacts of opting out of Medicaid expansion was the most-read Health Affairs Blog post from January 1 to March 31, 2014.

Next on the list was Robert York, Kenneth Kaufman, and Mark Grube‘s discussion of a regional study on the transformation from inpatient-centered care to an outpatient model focused on community-based care. This was followed by Susan Devore‘s commentary on changing health care trends and David Muhlestein‘s evaluation of accountable care organization growth.

Tim Jost is also listed four times for contributions to his Implementing Health Reform series on Medicaid asset rules, CMS letter to issuers, contraceptive coverage, and exchange and insurance market standards.

The full list appears below. Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


April 11th, 2014
by Chris Fleming

Billy Wynne at Healthcare Lighthouse offers this week’s edition of the Health Wonk Review. All of the posts in Billy’s “April Fool’s” edition are an excellent read, including the Health Affairs Blog post by Dean Aufderheide on mental illness in America’s jails and prisons. Read the rest of this entry »

Takeaways From The Aspen Institute’s Care Innovation Summit


April 10th, 2014
by Matthew Richardson

Back in February, The Aspen Institute and The Advisory Board Company sponsored the Care Innovation Summit in Washington, DC. With a keynote address from Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius, the daylong summit featured some of the newest data and research on the rapidly evolving U.S. health care landscape.

Featured speakers such as Jeffrey Brenner of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers and Claudia Grossmann of the Institute of Medicine in addition to others from State and Federal government, insurers, hospitals, and research institutions offered insights on higher-value care and improved health for individuals and populations.

Here are five most memorable takeaways:

1. Health Care Cost Inflation Has Slowed

Perhaps the most eye-catching data trend presented was the dramatic slowing of Medicare spending showcased by Patrick Conway, Director of CMMI (presentation available here). The collapse of annual per capita spending growth is important not only because it implies significant value changes are underway in the provision of ever more services by Medicare, but also because it can further mean many things to many people. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: Global Health Funding In 2013 Five Times Greater Than 1990


April 8th, 2014
by Tracy Gnadinger

Development assistance for health (DAH) to low- and middle-income countries provided by donors and international agencies are given in the form of grants, low-cost loans, and goods and services. Without this assistance, some of the poorest countries would be less able to supply basic health care.

A new study, being released today as a Web First by Health Affairs, tracked the flow of development assistance for health and estimated that in 2013 it reached $31.3 billion.

Looking at past growth patterns of these international transfers of funds for health, authors Joseph Dieleman, Casey Graves, Tara Templin, Elizabeth Johnson, Ranju Baral, Katherine Leach-Kemon, Anne Haakenstad, and Christopher Murray identified a steady 6.5 percent annualized growth rate between 1990 and 2000, which nearly doubled to 11.3 percent between 2001 and 2010 with the burgeoning of many public-private partnerships. Since 2011, however, annualized growth has dramatically dropped, to 1.1 percent, due, in part, to the effect of the global economic crisis. Read the rest of this entry »

New Health Affairs: Implications Of Alzheimer’s And The State Of Research


April 7th, 2014
by Chris Fleming

Health Affairs’  April issue addresses the litany of public and personal ramifications of Alzheimer’s disease—the most expensive condition in the United States both in terms of real costs and the immeasurable toll on loved ones. Articles examine best practices and models of care; a global view of the disease; the effects on caregivers; and what may lie ahead for a disproportionately underfunded research community.

Unnecessary hospital and emergency department (ED) visits are particularly difficult on people with Alzheimer’s—and costly to the health care system—but they experience them more often than their counterparts without dementia. Zhanlian Feng of RTI International and colleagues examined Medicare claims data linked to the Health and Retirement Study to determine hospital and ED use among older people with and without dementia across community and institutional settings. They found that in the community older people with dementia were more likely to have a hospitalization or ED visit than those without dementia, and that both groups had a marked increase in health care usage near the end of life.

Specifically, they found significant differences in hospitalizations and ED visits among community-dwelling residents, with 26.7 percent of dementia patients versus 18.7 percent of non-dementia residents experiencing hospitalization, and 34.5 percent versus 25.4 percent experiencing an ED visit. Differences were less pronounced among nursing home residents and tended to even out among all groups in the last year of life. The researchers suggest that policy makers consider promoting the use of alternative end-of-life options such as hospice care and providing supportive services and advance care planning to Medicare beneficiaries that can help reduce avoidable hospital-based care. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Briefing Reminder: Long Reach Of Alzheimer’s Disease


April 4th, 2014
by Chris Fleming

Despite decades of effort, finding breakthrough treatments or a cure for Alzheimer’s has eluded researchers. In the April 2014 issue of Health AffairsThe Long Reach Of Alzheimer’s Disease, we explore the many subjects raised by the disease: the optimal care patients receive and the testing of new models, international comparisons of how the disease is treated, families’ end-of-life dilemmas, a new public-private research collaboration designed to produce improved treatments, and others.

Please join us on Wednesday, April 9, at W Hotel in Washington, DC, for a Health Affairs briefing where we will unveil the issue.  We are delighted to welcome Dr. Richard Hodes, director of the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health to deliver the Keynote. Read the full briefing agenda.

WHEN:
Wednesday, April 9, 2014
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE:
W Hotel Washington
515 15th Street NW, Washington, DC (Metro Center)
Great Room, Lower Level

 REGISTER ONLINE

Follow live Tweets from the briefing @HA_Events, and join in the conversation with the hashtag #HA_Alzheimers.

Read the rest of this entry »

Recent Health Policy Briefs: Mental Health Parity And ICD-10 Update


April 3rd, 2014
by Tracy Gnadinger

The latest Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation examines the issue of mental health parity. The push to make coverage for mental health treatment equal to that of physical health has been on legislative to-do lists for some time, both in Congress and in state houses. This brief looks at the evolution of the Mental Health Parity Act, originally passed by Congress in 1996 as well as changes in mental health parity brought about by the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Also posted today: an update to the last month’s brief on the transition to ICD-10. Congress recently passed legislation delaying the system’s implementation. Click here to learn what the delay means for providers and payers.

Health Policy Briefs are aimed at policy makers, congressional staffers, and others needing short, jargon-free explanations of health policy basics. Sign up for an e-mail alert about upcoming briefs. The briefs are also available from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s website. Please feel free to forward the briefs to any of your colleagues who are tracking health issues. And after you’ve taken a look, we welcome your feedback at: hpbrief@healthaffairs.org. Read the rest of this entry »

Responding To ‘The Hidden Curriculum’: Don’t Forget About The Patient


April 3rd, 2014
by Rob Lott

Narrative Matters readers might remember Joshua Liao’s moving essay about the dangers of the Hidden Curriculum. Liao, a resident physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, wrote about the consequences of making a serious mistake as a medical student on an obstetrics rotation. He read the essay for the Narrative Matters podcast and it’s a great listen.

Liao’s essay, penned with Eric Thomas and Sigall Bell, also generated some compelling responses. It inspired Tim Lahey to write about his experience leading the curriculum redesign at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine. And when the Washington Post ran an excerpt of Liao’s essay last week, it led Franca Posner to remind readers about “one missing piece of this puzzle”: the patient’s perspective.

Posner was once in a similar situation, but it was she on the hospital bed: “I was that woman 20 years ago, only I was almost 40 and had a 5-year-old child and five miscarriages in my reproductive history,” Posner wrote in a letter to the editor published in the Post’s Health and Science section on March 31. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Reform And Criminal Justice: Advancing New Opportunities


April 1st, 2014
by Chris Fleming

Community Oriented Correctional Health Services (COCHS) and Health Affairs invite you to join thought leaders from public safety, health care, philanthropy, and all levels of government to further explore the intersection of health reform and criminal justice. As implementation of the Affordable Care Act continues, it is time to take stock of how far we have come in addressing the needs of the jail population through policy and planning, and to set our direction for the future.

This national event will take place on Thursday, April 3, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., at the Columbus Club in Union Station, Washington, D.C. It is being organized with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Jacob & Valeria Langeloth Foundation, and Public Welfare Foundation. Registration for in-person attendance is closed, but a live webcast is available.

The unique health care needs of the jail-involved population are well understood. The challenges now are how best to leverage change brought about by health reform and how to connect the jail-involved population to community-based systems of care. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Policy Leader Alan Weil To Become New Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief


March 31st, 2014
by Chris Fleming

Health Affairs and its publisher Project HOPE are pleased to announce that Alan Weil will become the journal’s new editor-in-chief on June 2, 2014.

Weil, a highly respected expert in health policy and current member of Health Affairs’ editorial board, will lead the journal after serving as the executive director of the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) since 2004. His work with state policymakers of both political parties put Weil at the forefront of health reform policy, implementation, innovation, and practice. Prior to his leadership of NASHP, he served in both the public and private sectors. He directed the Urban Institute’s “Assessing New Federalism” project; served as the executive director of the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing and a health policy advisor to Colorado’s then-governor, Roy Romer; and was the assistant general counsel in the Massachusetts Department of Medical Security.

“We’re delighted to welcome Alan to the Project HOPE family,” said John P. Howe III, M.D., President and CEO of Project HOPE.  “He comes to Health Affairs with more than 24 years of experience in health policy development and a stellar record of leadership and innovation in this field.  I’m confident he will lead the journal’s talented staff on a new and successful path forward.  I am extremely grateful to John Iglehart, the Founding Editor of Health Affairs for his stewardship of the journal for more than 25 years, ensuring its coveted rank as the leading health policy journal of our time.”

“Alan Weil’s extensive background in health and health care policy will serve him well in his new role as Health Affairs’ editor-in-chief,” noted John Iglehart, who currently leads the journal.  “With his position on the front lines of health system change, he is an experienced leader who has deep familiarity with and longstanding connections to the health policy, research, and health care leadership communities.  In particular, in his role as NASHP’s executive director, Alan worked on complex issues of critical importance to leaders in state and federal government and the private sector.  This background will serve Health Affairs well as it continues to grow in influence both in the US and globally.” Read the rest of this entry »

Contributing Voices

Implementing Health Reform: CBO Projects Lower ACA Costs, Greater Coverage


April 15th, 2014
by Timothy Jost

On April 14, 2014, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, together with the staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation, released an updated estimate on the Effects of the Insurance Coverage Provisions of the Affordable Care Act.  The CBO report brings good news for the ACA.   The CBO projects now that the ACA’s coverage provisions will cost $5 billion less for this year than it projected just two months ago.  Over the 2015 to 2024 period, CBO projects that the ACA will cost $104 billion less than it projected in February.  At the same time, the CBO projects that the number of uninsured Americans will in fact decrease by an additional one million over the next decade, by 26 rather than 25 million, as it estimated in February.

The CBO report estimates that the net cost of the ACA’s coverage provisions will be $36 billion in 2014, $1,383 billion over the 2015 to 2024 period.  This estimate consists of $1,839 billion for  premium tax credits and cost-sharing reduction payments, Medicaid, CHIP, and small employer tax credits, offset by $456 billion in receipts from penalty payments, the excise tax on high-premium insurance plans, and the effects on tax revenues of projected changes in employer coverage. The CBO report does not include an estimate of the total reduction in the federal deficit attributable to the ACA, as the CBO has concluded that it is no longer possible to estimate the net effect of ACA changes on existing federal programs, but the most recent CBO estimate from 2012 projected that the ACA would reduce the federal deficit over the 2013 to 2022 period by $109 billion.   Given projected further reductions in Medicare spending projected in a CBO budget report also released on April 14, it is reasonable to believe that the ACA’s impact on the budget may be even greater than earlier estimated. Read the rest of this entry »

Payment and Delivery Reform Case Study: Congestive Heart Failure


April 15th, 2014
by Darshak Sanghavi

Editor’s note: In addition to Darshak Sanghavi (photo and bio above), this post is coauthored by Meaghan George, a project manager at the Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform at the Brookings Institution. The post is adapted from a full-length case study, the first in a series of case studies made possible through the Engelberg Center’s Merkin Initiative on Physician Payment Reform and Clinical Leadership, a special project to develop clinician leadership of health care delivery, payment and financing reform under the leadership of Mark McClellan. The case studies will be presented using a “MEDTalk” format featuring live story-telling and knowledge-sharing from patients, providers, and policymakers. The event series will kickoff on Wednesday, April 16 from 10 a.m. – Noon EST.

Introduction

Clinicians and hospitals across the nation struggle with providing and paying for optimal care for their congestive health failure (CHF) patients. However, there are opportunities to make care better. In fact, of the more than 10,000 pages in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) implementing regulations, the least talked about are the dozens of small experiments led by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) that test new ways to pay for medical services.

We use a case study approach to investigate and tell the story of what two academic medical centers, Duke University Health System (“Duke”) and University of Colorado Hospital (“Colorado”), are doing to innovate and improve CHF care while implementing alternative payment models offered by CMMI. Read the rest of this entry »

The Case For Global Health Diplomacy


April 14th, 2014
by Bill Frist

At the end of February, I had the pleasure of speaking about global health diplomacy at the Nursing Leadership in Global Health Symposium at Vanderbilt University. Nurses are one of the specialties that we support in the Frist Global Health Leaders program facilitated by Hope Through Healing Hands, a nonprofit dedicated to advancing peace by supporting health care services and education in some of the world’s most vulnerable communities. Nurses, including the men and women I met at Vanderbilt, have an enormous opportunity to affect health and global health diplomacy. Indeed, everyone in the medical profession can play a crucial role in health diplomacy.

Global Health Diplomacy And Foreign Policy

For several years now I’ve been thinking about—and speaking about—global health diplomacy. The term started appearing around 2000 and has many definitions, representing the complexity of the issue itself. Diplomacy, at the simplest level, is a tool used in negotiating foreign policy. Health diplomacy is different, though. As a physician, the overall goal of health is clear: improve quality of life by improving health and meeting overall patient goals of care. As a diplomat and policymaker, the goal is more complicated.

Foreign policy, in general, is a dance—a negotiation of shared goals and identification of conflicts between nations, always with inherent tension. For example, what we want for the government of Afghanistan may not align with their complex political and cultural ideologies. Read the rest of this entry »

Origins In Oregon: The Alternative Payment Methodology Project


April 14th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a periodic Health Affairs Blog series, which will run over the next year, looking at payment and delivery reforms in Arkansas and Oregon. The posts will be based on evaluations of these reforms performed with the support of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The authors of this post are part of the team evaluating the Oregon model.

How the country pays for health care is currently at odds with its vision of how health care should be delivered. Traditional fee-for-service health care payments are linked to the volume of visits, rather than the quality of patient-centered care.

To unlink payment from the volume of services provided and begin aligning it with value, Oregon recently launched the Alternative Payment Methodology (APM) demonstration project, where participating community health centers (CHCs)—aka federally qualified health centers—no longer earn revenue based on the number of individual patient seen. Instead, community health centers will receive a monthly payment based on the size and composition of their patient population, shifting the paradigm from the number of doctor visits to the provision of high-quality, team-based, patient-centered care.

APM is being piloted at three Oregon Community Health Centers: Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center, Mosaic Medical, and OHSU Family Medicine at Richmond. The clinics are receiving technical assistance from the Oregon Primary Care Association (OPCA) and other community, regional and national partners.

With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a team of researchers from Oregon Health and Science University and OCHIN, one of the nation’s largest health information networks, is investigating the impact of APM on the delivery of primary care in safety-net populations. In addition to regular posts like this one, the research team will also share lessons learned and perspectives from key stakeholders on Frontiers of Health Care. Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Changing Focus, And Changing Leadership, At HHS (Updated)


April 11th, 2014
by Timothy Jost

Editor’s note: This post was updated on April 12 to conclude with a discussion of an April 11 CMS guidance explaining how the agency will ensure that the ACA risk corridor program remains budget neutral.

With the March 31, 2014 deadline for applying for qualified health plan coverage through the health insurance exchanges behind us, and the April 15, 2014 deadline for completing those applications upon us, Affordable Care Act implementation has quieted considerably.  The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have been very active on the Medicare front, releasing in recent days their 2015 Medicare Advantage Rate Announcement and Call Letter and publishing data on Medicare payments to 880,000 Medicare providers.  But on the exchange and insurance market reform side, CMS has only one major proposed rule pending at this time, the Exchange and Insurance Market Standards Rule proposed in March, and nothing pending for regulatory review at the Office of Management and Budget.

I am unaware of any major regulatory issuances expected in the immediate future from the Departments of Treasury or Labor, although Treasury does have a number of proposed rules on the table that have yet to be finalized dealing with issues such as minimum value of employer coverage or premium tax credit reporting requirements for exchanges. Read the rest of this entry »

Medicare Advantage Rolls On


April 11th, 2014
by Billy Wynne

Monday afternoon, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the final rates and other reimbursement policies for Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, referred to as the Final Call Letter. Once again, the Administration took pains to ameliorate planned cuts to MA, demonstrating the program’s increasing popularity with seniors and, by extension, its robust political strength.

For my money, we’ll look back at this year as the final hurdle the program jumped on its path to dominating the Medicare benefit for a generation to come. It’s already well on its way, covering 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries and growing. So let’s take a quick tour of the MA program’s initially volatile history and the winning streak it’s been on of late, culminating with the breaks the Administration cut it this go round.

The past. First there was the growth and then precipitous decline of managed care in the 90s, a wave that the program – then called Medicare+Choice – rode alongside the commercial sector. Read the rest of this entry »

It’s Always Too Soon Until It’s Too Late: Advanced Care Planning With Alzheimer’s


April 10th, 2014
by Ellen Goodman

Editor’s note: This post is published in conjunction with the April issue of Health Affairs, which features a series of articles on Alzheimer’s disease.

I cannot write about Alzheimer’s disease without writing about my sister. For that matter, it is probably best to begin with the building where the word was first said to her. After all, my sister Jane was an architecture critic and buildings mattered to her, as did the urbanscape, and her whole vision of a people-centered city.

The building where she’d been diagnosed with “mild cognitive impairment” was a former military base now recycled into a labyrinth of medical offices, including the department where the people who clocked and studied—but could not curtail—the decline of her memory were lodged with their pencils and papers.

To get to the office, we had to drive into the imposing parking garage, take an elevator to the only floor where there was a bridge to the medical building, cross that bridge, then take a second elevator downstairs to register, get an electronic key, then ride upstairs again and find our way through a mysterious series of halls to the right door and unlock it.

This elaborate rite of passage never failed to strike me as a bizarre test in itself. Who designed this? What memory-impaired patient could remotely navigate this journey? Was this some sort of black humor, a way to triage those with or without the “executive function” to get there? Those with or without a caregiver who could lead her? Read the rest of this entry »

What’s Past Is Prologue: Making The Case For PET Beta-Amyloid Imaging Coverage


April 9th, 2014
by Dora Hughes

Editor’s note: This post is published in conjunction with the April issue of Health Affairs, which features a series of articles on Alzheimer’s disease.

In September of 2013, CMS issued its final decision memo that concluded positron emission tomography- amyloid beta (PET Aβ) imaging is “not reasonable or necessary”, finding “insufficient evidence” that use of this diagnostic tool would improve health outcomes for patients with dementia or neurodegenerative disease. As such, PET Aβ imaging to help diagnose Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is not a covered service for Medicare beneficiaries except for those enrolled in CMS-approved clinical trials.

CMS’ final decision underscores the emerging new paradigm for coverage decision-making, requiring innovators not only to demonstrate to FDA’s satisfaction that their products are effective, but also to prove to CMS and other payors that their use will improve clinical outcomes.  This paradigm will increase confidence in the value and health benefit of new technologies, although it will make the path to coverage more difficult and uncertain for diagnostic developers. Read the rest of this entry »

Accelerating Medicines Partnership: A New Public-Private Collaboration For Drug Discovery


April 8th, 2014
 
by Aaron Kesselheim and Yongtian Tan

Editor’s note: This post is published in conjunction with the April issue of Health Affairs, which explores the many subjects raised by Alzheimer’s disease including a new public-private research collaboration designed to produce improved treatments.

Earlier this year, the National Institutes of Health joined forces with ten major pharmaceutical companies and several nonprofit disease interest groups to create the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP). With an integrated governance structure consisting of representatives from all partners, the AMP venture aims to combine public-private expertise and pooled resources to reduce the time and cost of developing biomarkers for therapeutic targets.

The initial capitalization is reported to be $230 million.  The AMP is the first national cross-sector partnership of its size and scale, and is the latest initiative in the drug development market to embrace open data exchange, encouraging collaboration over competition as pathways for promoting innovation.

The AMP management chose to focus on four diseases—Alzheimer’s disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus—in which there was solid knowledge about the underlying pathophysiology, a sufficient level of potential therapeutic targets open to pursuit, and a lack of substantial individual manufacturer commitment.  The latter criterion explains why more prevalent diseases such as cancer did not make the list. Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Medicaid & CHIP February 2014 Report


April 5th, 2014
by Timothy Jost

On April 4, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released their Medicaid & CHIP February 2014 Monthly Applications, Eligibility Determinations, and Enrollment Report.   (Blog post here.)  For the first time, the February monthly report provides meaningful data on enrollment.

Like previous reports, the report gives the total number of applications received by all reporting state agencies (2,207,513) and total number of individuals determined eligible for Medicaid and CHIP by state agencies (2,249,120). For comparison, the numbers of applications is down from initial January reports (2,266,778), but the number of determinations is up (2,436,879).

As with previous reports, however, these numbers are subject to so many qualifications as to be little use for determining growth of the Medicaid program.  The data do not include numbers from New York and Washington, while Tennessee only reported CHIP data.  They are also very preliminary — the January determinations figure was revised upwards by about a fifth in February. Read the rest of this entry »

Authors: Click here to submit a post.



Search Blog
  
Conversations Podcast February 25, 2014
Email Notifications
Recent Comments
Categories
Twitter Updates
Blogroll