- Health Affairs Blog - http://healthaffairs.org/blog/ -

Skeptical Look At P4P Leads HA Blog’s October Top Ten

Posted By Chris Fleming On November 6, 2012 @ 1:04 pm In All Categories,Health Reform,Hospitals,Insurance,Payment,Quality,States | No Comments

Will pay for performance backfire? That’s the question addressed in the most-read Health Affairs Blog post for October. Steffie Woolhandler, Dan Ariely, and David Himmelstein [1] look to behavioral economics to explain the lack of evidence that P4P is benefiting patients.

Next on October’s top-ten list is Amy Boutwell’s [2] examination of efforts to prevent hospital readmissions and the new Medicare penalties for excessive readmissions, which kicked in on October 1. Following that is Sonya Schwartz’s [3] survey of which plans states are choosing as benchmarks for the “essential health benefits” that must be offered under the Affordable Care Act.

The full list of most-read posts for October appears below.
.

  1. Will Pay For Performance Backfire? Insights From Behavioral Economics [4]
    by Steffie Woolhandler, Dan Ariely and David Himmelstein
  2. Time To Get Serious About Hospital Readmissions [5]
    by Amy Boutwell
  3. States Take A First Step On The Path To Essential Health Benefits [6]
    by Sonya Schwartz
  4. Do Medicare And Medicaid Payment Rates Really Threaten Physicians With Bankruptcy? [7]
    by James Rickert
  5. Transforming Care Through Transparency [8]
    by Anne Weiss
  6. Creating Outcome-Driven Health Care Markets [9]
    by Nakhil Sahni and Robert Kocher
  7. Realizing The Promise Of Integrated Care For The Dual Eligibles [10]
    by Robert Master
  8. Turning Consumers Into Shoppers: Using High-Deductible Plans Wisely [11]
    by Maribeth Shannon
  9. The Growing Bipartisan Support For Health Courts [12]
    by Philip Howard
  10. Health Policy Brief: Pay For Performance [13]
    by Chris Fleming

Article printed from Health Affairs Blog: http://healthaffairs.org/blog

URL to article: http://healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/11/06/skeptical-look-at-p4p-leads-ha-blogs-october-top-ten/

URLs in this post:

[1] Steffie Woolhandler, Dan Ariely, and David Himmelstein: http://healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/11/will-pay-for-performance-backfire-insights-from-behavioral-economics/

[2] Amy Boutwell’s: http://healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/10/time-to-get-serious-about-hospital-readmissions/

[3] Sonya Schwartz’s: http://healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/03/states-take-a-first-step-on-the-path-to-essential-health-benefits/

[4] Will Pay For Performance Backfire? Insights From Behavioral Economics: http://www.healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/11/will-pay-for-performance-backfire-insights-from-behavioral-economics/

[5] Time To Get Serious About Hospital Readmissions: http://www.healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/10/time-to-get-serious-about-hospital-readmissions/

[6] States Take A First Step On The Path To Essential Health Benefits: http://www.healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/03/states-take-a-first-step-on-the-path-to-essential-health-benefits/

[7] Do Medicare And Medicaid Payment Rates Really Threaten Physicians With Bankruptcy?: http://www.healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/02/do-medicare-and-medicaid-payment-rates-really-threaten-physicians-with-bankruptcy/

[8] Transforming Care Through Transparency: http://www.healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/05/transforming-care-through-transparency/

[9] Creating Outcome-Driven Health Care Markets: http://www.healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/23/creating-outcome-driven-health-care-markets/

[10] Realizing The Promise Of Integrated Care For The Dual Eligibles: http://www.healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/22/realizing-the-promise-of-integrated-care-for-the-dual-eligibles/

[11] Turning Consumers Into Shoppers: Using High-Deductible Plans Wisely: http://www.healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/18/turning-consumers-into-shoppers-using-high-deductible-plans-wisely/

[12] The Growing Bipartisan Support For Health Courts: http://www.healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/02/the-growing-bipartisan-support-for-health-courts/

[13] Health Policy Brief: Pay For Performance: http://www.healthaffairs.org/blog/2012/10/11/health-policy-brief-pay-for-performance/