Alain Enthoven is Marriner S. Eccles Professor of Public and Private Management, Emeritus, at Stanford Graduate School of Business. Professor Enthoven holds degrees in Economics from Stanford, Oxford, and MIT. In 1956 he began at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica and participated in continuing studies on U.S. and NATO defense strategies. In 1960, he moved to the Department of Defense, where he held several positions leading to appointment, by President Johnson, to the position of Assistant Secretary of Defense for Systems Analysis in 1965. His work there is described in the book How Much is Enough? coauthored with K. Wayne Smith and published by the RAND Corporation. Since the 1970’s he has focused on analysis of the U.S. health system and development of reform strategies. After the Defense Department, he served as President of Litton Medical Products, a diversified multinational medical technology company. In 1972, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine, now the National Academy of Medicine. In 1977, he served as a consultant to the Carter Administration on health insurance. He designed and proposed Consumer Choice Health Plan, a proposal for Universal Health Insurance based on Regulated Competition in the Private Sector. From 1973 to 2013, he served as a consultant to Kaiser Permanente.


Recent Posts by Alain Enthoven

Universal Health Coverage? Why?

Forcing health care into a simplistic left-right straitjacket misleads the nation. It is time to recast the issue properly.

Don’t Repeal the “Cadillac Tax” On High Cost Health Plans

The Cadillac Tax was intended to help correct some of the perverse incentives created by the exclusion, as well as to help pay for subsidies for health insurance purchases. Some employers and unions are now lobbying for its repeal.

Managed Competition 2014: Rescued By The Private Sector?

Managed Competition (MC) among health care financing and delivery systems was first conceived as a proposed public policy to drive delivery system change in the private sector by assuring consumers that they have choices, as well as rewards for choosing high-value providers. Many legislative...

Bring Medicare Into The Twenty-First Century

Twentieth Century Medicare. Medicare, the federal medical and hospital insurance program for seniors and disabled, reflects the popular understanding of medical care 50 years ago:  primarily treatment by doctors of acute episodes such as pneumonia.  Medicare’s design was based on the historical...

Public Coverage Programs: Solving the Enrollment Dilemma

Editor’s Note: In addition to Alain Enthoven and Leonard Schaeffer (photos and bios above), this post is coauthored by David Helwig and Phil Lebherz. Helwig retired as President and CEO West Region for WellPoint, Inc., and he also served as chief executive officer and president of Blue...

Would Reform Bills Control Costs? A Response To Atul Gawande

Atul Gawande, MD, is one of the best medical writers of our time. I subscribed to the New Yorker just so I could read him.  I reached eagerly for my Dec. 14, 2009 New Yorker when I heard he had an article there. I was deeply disappointed. What worries me is that his article will  Continue...

A Tax That Targets Health Insurance Innovation

The Senate Finance Committee is now considering a proposal that would impose an aggregate tax of $6.7 billion dollars per year on “any U.S. health insurance provider,” in proportion to market share, whether for profit or not for profit, but not on employers who “self fund” their employees’...

Building A Health Marketplace That Works

In the debate about health reform, many issues are getting an inordinate amount of attention, but one is not getting the detailed consideration it deserves. How it is finally resolved is likely to be one of the key factors of the ultimate plan’s success or failure. That issue is the...

HEALTH REFORM: Consumers and Competition

Michael Porter and Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg’s overall vision for health care delivery is an archipelago of free-standing Integrated Practice Units (IPUs), each focused on the total cycle of care for a medical condition. This contrasts to the view of competition among integrated delivery...