Joseph R. Antos is the Wilson H. Taylor Scholar in Health Care and Retirement Policy at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). He also is a Commissioner of the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission, and an Adjunct Professor at the Gillings School of Global Public Health of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Prior to joining AEI, he was Assistant Director for Health and Human Resources at the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), and he held senior positions in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of Management and Budget, and the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. He also has extensive experience as an adviser to the U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Bank, and governments in Europe and Asia.


Mr. Antos has written, lectured, and testified before Congress on the economics of health policy, including Medicare and broader health system reform, health care financing, health insurance regulation, and the uninsured. He is the editor with Alice Rivlin of Restoring Fiscal Sanity 2007: The Health Spending Challenge (Brookings Institution Press, 2007). He is past chairman of the Coalition for Health Services Research, a member of CBO’s panel of health advisers, and he serves on a variety of professional boards. He earned his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Rochester.


Recent Posts by Joseph Antos

The Future Of Delivery System Reform

There is bipartisan agreement on the goal of promoting more efficient and effective health care. The debate is over the best way to accomplish the goal, not the goal itself.

CBO Provides A Roadmap For Improving AHCA

CBO is basically correct that AHCA would trigger a short-run rise in premiums and both short- and longer-term increases in the number of uninsured people. Instead of trying to discredit these findings, AHCA’s authors would be better off using CBO’s estimate as a guide for fixing the bill.

Republicans Should Take The Time Necessary To Improve The American Health Care Act

The ACA repeal and replace plan, dubbed the American Health Care Act, has the major components needed for effective health reform. However, the plan falls short on several crucial details, details that can and should be changed before the bill clears Congress and goes to the president to become law.

Maryland’s All-Payer Model—Achievements, Challenges, And Next Steps

As the model begins its fourth year, Maryland is meeting or exceeding all of its key CMS requirements.

The Problems With ‘Repeal And Delay’

The most likely end result of “repeal and delay” would be less secure insurance for many Americans, procrastination by political leaders, and ultimately no discernible movement toward a real marketplace for either insurance or medical services.

The Future Of The ACA’s Exchanges

The main problem with the exchanges is not with the exchanges themselves, but with Affordable Care Act policies that have undermined the ongoing viability of the entire individual insurance market.

The House Republicans’ Health Plan

The basic goal of the newly released House GOP health reform plan is to ensure all Americans have access to affordable health insurance and high quality health care services, but without as much reliance on federal control and regulation as the ACA.

The ACA And Its Employment Effects

Given the structure of the ACA, it would be hard to conclude the law would not eventually reduce hours worked or total compensation, although the magnitude of the resulting changes may be as yet hard to detect in the U.S.’s large and complex labor markets.

Improving Health And Health Care: An Agenda For Reform

We propose a plan to replace the ACA and to enact major reforms to the tax treatment of employer-sponsored health care, Medicaid, Medicare, Health Savings Accounts, and other areas. The plan would reorient health policy away from bureaucratic regulation and toward patients and consumer preferences.

A Market-Based Contingency Plan for King v. Burwell

If the Supreme Court rules in favor of the plaintiffs in the King v. Burwell case, Congress will have the opportunity to advance health-care policies that expand consumer choice, increase coverage, deliver better value for the dollar, and allow state governments more say over health care policy.