Joseph R. Antos is the Wilson H. Taylor Scholar in Health Care and Retirement Policy at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). He also is a Commissioner of the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission, and an Adjunct Professor at the Gillings School of Global Public Health of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Prior to joining AEI, he was Assistant Director for Health and Human Resources at the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), and he held senior positions in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of Management and Budget, and the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. He also has extensive experience as an adviser to the U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Bank, and governments in Europe and Asia.


Mr. Antos has written, lectured, and testified before Congress on the economics of health policy, including Medicare and broader health system reform, health care financing, health insurance regulation, and the uninsured. He is the editor with Alice Rivlin of Restoring Fiscal Sanity 2007: The Health Spending Challenge (Brookings Institution Press, 2007). He is past chairman of the Coalition for Health Services Research, a member of CBO’s panel of health advisers, and he serves on a variety of professional boards. He earned his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Rochester.


Recent Posts by Joseph Antos

The Graham-Cassidy Plan: Sweeping Changes In A Compressed Time Frame

After the difficult process of considering ACA repeal-and-replace plans, and with the ticking Reconciliation clock, the GOP is rushing to pass Graham-Cassidy. But they should be mindful of the perception that the bill is being pushed through with insufficient time to raise legitimate questions.

Suggestions For A Bipartisan Approach On Health Care

There are many differences between the ACA and GOP replacement proposals, and details matter. Nonetheless, the similarities provide a starting point for discussion that could bring about compromise on health reform.

CBO’s Estimates Of The Revised Senate Health Bill

The estimates of the June 26 and July 20 versions of the BCRA do not differ substantially from each other. However, Senate Republicans could spend as much as $300 billion more to create better opportunities for affordable coverage in the private market.

The Senate Health Care Bill

Yesterday, Senate Republican leaders released their version of health-care legislation. The bill is best understood as a GOP amendment to the Affordable Care Act. In 2009, if the Republicans had attempted to modify rather than defeat the ACA, this is the kind of amendment they might have offered.

The Basis For Compromise On Medicaid Reform And Expansion

A compromise plan would combine a middle-ground expansion of the program with financing reforms that lower costs over the longer term without imposing undue risks to beneficiaries or the states.

The CBO’s Updated Estimate Of The AHCA

The overall thrust of the CBO’s report is surely correct, and the task of the US Senate now is to improve the bill.

The Future Of Delivery System Reform

There is bipartisan agreement on the goal of promoting more efficient and effective health care. The debate is over the best way to accomplish the goal, not the goal itself.

CBO Provides A Roadmap For Improving AHCA

CBO is basically correct that AHCA would trigger a short-run rise in premiums and both short- and longer-term increases in the number of uninsured people. Instead of trying to discredit these findings, AHCA’s authors would be better off using CBO’s estimate as a guide for fixing the bill.

Republicans Should Take The Time Necessary To Improve The American Health Care Act

The ACA repeal and replace plan, dubbed the American Health Care Act, has the major components needed for effective health reform. However, the plan falls short on several crucial details, details that can and should be changed before the bill clears Congress and goes to the president to become law.

Maryland’s All-Payer Model—Achievements, Challenges, And Next Steps

As the model begins its fourth year, Maryland is meeting or exceeding all of its key CMS requirements.