Allyson Y. Schwartz, a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania who served from 2005-2015, is President and CEO of Better Medicare Alliance and a nationally recognized leader on health care issues. Throughout her professional life she has worked on issues such as affordability, prevention, primary care, coordinated care, and increased access to coverage.


Having worked as a health service executive, Schwartz was elected to the Pennsylvania State Senate in 1990, serving 14 years until her election to Congress. In the state Senate, Schwartz was the driving force behind Pennsylvania’s CHIP program, which was a model for the federal CHIP program five years later.


In Congress, Schwartz was appointed to the powerful Ways and Means committee in her second term, and served as a senior member of the Budget Committee. In both capacities, Schwartz was a strong advocate for Medicare. She was the leader in Congress on physician payment reform to encourage value over volume, supported research, innovation, and use of technology to improve quality, efficiency, and contain costs.


Schwartz was instrumental in the passage of landmark health reform legislation, authoring key provisions such as the ban on pre-existing condition exclusions for children and increased access to primary care.


Schwartz is a Distinguished Policy Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Visiting Fellow at the Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative, Senior Fellow for Health Policy at the Center for American Progress, and Co-Chair of the Bipartisan Policy Center Health and Housing Task Force.


Schwartz earned a B.A. from Simmons College, and a Master of Social Service (MSS) from Bryn Mawr College. She is married, has two grown sons, a daughter-in-law, and a 2 ½-year-old granddaughter.


Recent Posts by Allyson Schwartz

Integrating Health Care And Housing To Promote Healthy Aging

By 2030, 74 million Americans will be 65 years of age or more. Ensuring a safe, age-friendly home and utilizing the home as a potential site of care for seniors should be seen as important policy objectives to support care management.