Blog Home

Author Archive




Health Affairs Web First: Assessing Health And Health Care Perceptions In sub-Saharan Africa


February 27th, 2015

A large share of Western aid to developing countries goes to sub-Saharan Africa, a region where spending on health care is around $100 per person in 2005 price-adjusted terms. This region, which experienced large gains in life expectancy in the years following World War II, suffered health-related setbacks in the closing years of the twentieth century as a result of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

The authors of a February 25 Health Affairs Web First study used data from the Gallup Organization’s 2012 World Poll to investigate health and health care perceptions in sub-Saharan Africa compared to other regions of the world. The poll found that sub-Saharan Africans’ overall evaluation of their well-being was lower than that of any other population in the world. Additionally, only 42.4 percent of residents in that region were satisfied with the availability of high-quality health care in their community, also the lowest level in the world. Even so, when sub-Saharan Africans were asked to name the issues that should be the highest priorities for their government, health care was not seen as the most pressing issue.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


February 19th, 2015

Last week Peggy Salvatore posted a Valentine’s Day edition of the Health Wonk Review at the Health System Ed blog. Peggy includes Ron Pollack’s Health Affairs Blog “Contributing Voices” post arguing that both the text of the Affordable Care Act and congressional intent indicate that premium tax credits should be available in states using the Federally Facilitated Marketplace.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: Recent US Hospital Productivity Growth


February 11th, 2015

Between 2002 and 2011, US hospitals increased their productivity in treating Medicare patients for several serious illnesses, refuting fears about a “cost disease” in health care and potentially mitigating concerns about provider payment under the Affordable Care Act.

The study, released today by Health Affairs as a Web First, addresses the quality of care and the severity of patient illness (considerations not fully taken into account by previous studies on this topic) found that during those years, the annual rates of productivity growth were 0.78 percent for heart attacks, 0.62 percent for heart failure, and 1.90 percent for pneumonia.

When the authors John Romley, Dana Goldman, and Neeraj Sood calculated productivity growth rates without factoring in trends in the severity of patient conditions or outcomes achieved after hospitalization, the annual productivity rates were different: -0.64 percent for heart attacks, -0.91 percent for heart failure, and -0.39 percent for pneumonia.

Read the rest of this entry »

Request For Abstracts: Health Affairs Food And Health Theme Issue


February 4th, 2015

Health Affairs is planning a theme issue on food and health in November 2015. The issue will present work that explores the relationship between the food we consume and our wellbeing on the individual, societal, and global levels. Articles will address causes and consequences of dietary excess and insufficiency, analyze policies and programs aimed at influencing these, and explore the roles of public policy, industry, and stakeholder groups in the context of dietary behavior.

We invite all interested authors to submit abstracts for consideration for this issue.

The issue will consider the implications of global food production and distribution for the health of consumers and food workers, environmental quality, and food prices, among other things. It will also examine actions taken from the community level upward to address increasingly universal concerns about food-related illness. Several papers will provide broad overviews of key issues, but we are particularly interested in empirical analyses of specific policies, programs, and practices aimed at influencing dietary behavior and clarifying our thinking about food’s role in health.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Event Reminder: Biomedical Innovation


February 3rd, 2015

Biomedical innovation lengthens and enriches our lives through breakthroughs in medications and care, but it is has also been the leading source of health care cost growth over the past few decades. The February 2015 thematic issue of Health Affairs examines the topic from many perspectives.

You are invited to join us on Thursday, February 5, at a forum featuring authors from the new issue at the W Hotel in Washington, DC. Panels will cover pharmaceuticals; biotechnology; medical devices; and accelerating, diffusing, and financing innovation.

WHEN: 
Thursday, February 5, 2015
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE: 
W Hotel Washington
515 15th Street NW
Washington, DC, Great Room, Lower Level

REGISTER NOW!

Follow live Tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_BiomedInnovation.

See the full agenda. Among the confirmed speakers are:

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs’ February Issue: Biomedical Innovation


February 2nd, 2015

The February issue of Health Affairs includes a number of studies examining issues pertaining to biomedical innovation. Some of the subjects covered: how declining economic returns for new drugs may affect future investments, the changing landscape of Medicare coverage determinations for medical interventions, the slowly emerging US biosimilar market, and more.

With declining economic returns, can manufacturers afford to continue investing?

Ernst Berndt of Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Alfred P. Sloan School of Management and coauthors compared present values of average lifetime pharmaceutical revenues to present values of average drug research and development, and lifetime operating costs. Upon examining new prescription drugs launched over four distinct time periods between 1991 and 2009, the authors found that net economic returns reached a peak in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


January 30th, 2015

On January 29, Jason Shafrin at Health Care Economist published a “Super Bowl” edition of the Health Wonk Review. Jason’s round-up contains no hot air, but it’s not at all deflating — it includes two Health Affairs Blog posts on the present and future of Medicare ACOs by Mark McClellan and coauthors and Scott Heiser and coauthors.

We also want to give a delayed shout-out to the nice “shake the winter blahs” Health Wonk Review that Vince Kuraitis published at e-CareManagement on January 15. Vince included a Health Affairs Blog post by Uwe Reinhardt reacting to Jonathan Gruber’s controversial remarks and explaining why Americans aren’t stupid but are often ignorant about policy issues.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: Do Low-Income Consumers In Medicaid Opt-Out States Pay More Out Of Pocket?


January 28th, 2015

In the twenty-three states currently not expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), uninsured adults who would have been eligible for that program and have incomes at or above poverty are now generally eligible for subsidies to purchase health coverage in their state’s Marketplace exchange. How would out-of-pocket costs in the Marketplace compare with Medicaid coverage for this group of low-income Americans living in states not expanding Medicaid?

This study, being released by Health Affairs as a Web First, estimated these costs under two simulation scenarios: calculating out-of-pocket costs for families covered by a subsidized silver Marketplace plan and comparing that with coverage under Medicaid. Author Steven Hill found that Medicaid would more than halve these adults’ average annual family out-of-pocket spending ($938 versus $1,948).

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Briefing: Biomedical Innovation


January 20th, 2015

Biomedical innovation lengthens and enriches our lives through breakthroughs in medications and care, but it is has also been the leading source of health care cost growth over the past few decades. The upcoming February 2015 thematic issue of Health Affairs examines the topic from many perspectives.

You are invited to join us on Thursday, February 5, at a forum featuring authors from the new issue at the W Hotel in Washington, DC.  Panels will cover pharmaceuticals; biotechnology; medical devices; and accelerating, diffusing, and financing innovation.

WHEN: 
Thursday, February 5, 2015
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE: 
W Hotel Washington
515 15th Street NW
Washington, DC, Great Room, Lower Level

Register Now!

Follow live Tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairsand join in the conversation with #HA_BiomedInnovation.

Read the rest of this entry »

CMS Spending Report Leads Health Affairs 2014 Top-Ten List


January 13th, 2015

A report on 2012 health spending by analysts at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Office of the Actuary was the most-read Health Affairs article in 2014. To celebrate the New Year, Health Affairs is making this piece and all the articles on the journal’s 2014 top-ten list freely available to all readers for two weeks.

Health Affairs publishes annual retrospective analyses of National Health Expenditures by the CMS analysts, as well as their health spending projections for the coming decade. In the latest installment in this series — which also made our 2014 top ten — the analysts reported on 2013 health spending and discussed their findings at a Washington DC briefing. The two reports documented continued slow growth in health spending; the 2013 report featured the slowest rate of health spending growth since CMS began tracking NHE in 1960.

Next on the 2014 Health Affairs most-read list was an article on PepsiCo’s workplace wellnesss program. John Caloyeras and coauthors at RAND and PepsiCo found that the diseases management component of the program saved money, but the lifestyle management component did not. This was followed by two Narrative Matters essays by Charlotte Yeh and Diane Meier; another Narrative Matters piece, by Janice Lynn Schuster, rounded out the list at number ten.

The full top-ten list is below. And check out the 2014 most-read Health Affairs Blog posts and GrantWatch Blog posts.

Read the rest of this entry »

Medicaid Expansion Post Leads Health Affairs Blog 2014 Top-Fifteen List


January 8th, 2015

As we begin 2015, we present the fifteen most-read Health Affairs Blog posts from 2014. Topping the list is “Opting Out Of Medicaid Expansion: The Health And Financial Impacts,” by Sam Dickman, David Himmelstein, Danny McCormick, and Steffie Woolhander. “Low-income adults in states that have opted out of Medicaid expansion will forego gains in access to care, financial well-being, physical and mental health, and longevity that would be expected with expanded Medicaid coverage,” the authors write, and they offer a state-by-state projection of these consequences.

Next on the list is Susan DeVore‘s overview of health care trends to watch in 2014, followed by David Muhlestein‘s look at the likely growth of accountable care and an examination of declining inpatient hospital utilization by Robert York, Kenneth Kaufman, and Mark Grube. The list also includes two posts from Tim Jost’s comprehensive series on implementing the Affordable Care Act, on waiting periods for employer-sponsored health insurance and Medicaid asset rules.

Stay tuned for the 2014 most-read lists for Health Affairs journal and GrantWatch Blog.

The full top-fifteen list is below:

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs’ January Issue: Aging And Health


January 5th, 2015

The January issue of Health Affairs includes a number of studies examining issues pertaining to aging and health or health care. Other subjects covered include: the effect of Medicare’s Hospital Compare quality reports on hospital prices; how the Affordable Care Act’s provisions impact Americans shouldering high medical cost burdens; and whether California’s Hospital Fair Pricing Act has benefited uninsured patients.

Content on aging and health was supported by the John A. Hartford Foundation.

Read the rest of this entry »

Exhibit Of The Month: Federal Health Spending On Children


January 5th, 2015

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing Exhibit of the Month series.

As we begin the new year and look forward to the release of our January issue later today, we also take a look back at the “exhibit of the month” from our December thematic issue on children’s health. The exhibit, from the article, “The Scheduled Squeeze On Children’s Programs: Tracking The Implications Of Projected Federal Spending Patterns,” looks at health spending on children as a percentage of total federal spending on children from 1960 to 2013.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


December 23rd, 2014

Last Thursday, Julie Ferguson at Workers’ Comp Insider published the “holiday edition” of the Health Wonk Review. Her merry band of posts include a two-part Health Affairs Blog essay on payment reform by our very own editor-in-chief Alan Weil.

Read the rest of this entry »

New Findings About The ACA’s Impact On Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance


December 19th, 2014

Since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law, some of its critics have predicted that businesses would discontinue offering employer-sponsored health insurance, moving employees into the individual Marketplaces. If widespread dropping of employer-sponsored health insurance were to occur, government costs could increase since many low-wage workers would qualify for federal subsidies in the Marketplaces.

A new study, released today as a Web First by Health Affairs, examined data from the Health Reform Monitoring Survey for June 2013 through September 2014, assessing any early changes of employer-sponsored insurance under the ACA. Authors Fredric Blavin, Adele Shartzer, Sharon Long, and John Holahan report that the percentage of workers with employer offers for health insurance was basically unchanged between June 2013 and September 2014: 82.7 percent versus 82.2 percent. The authors are all affiliated with the Health Policy Center at the Urban Institute, in Washington, D.C. 

Read the rest of this entry »

Request For Abstracts: Health Affairs Non-Communicable Disease Theme Issue


December 19th, 2014

Health Affairs is planning a theme issue on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in September 2015. The issue will present work that describes the burden of NCDs, approaches to prevention and treatment of NCDs, and analysis of policies and initiatives aimed at prevention and treatment. The issue will have a global perspective.

We invite interested authors to submit abstracts for consideration for this issue.

We are using a broad definition of NCDs to include cancer, cardiovascular disease, respiratory illness, diabetes, mental illness, and the like. The issue will not focus on injuries, per se, but will address disability as an element of the disease burden of NCDs.

We plan to publish 15-20 peer-reviewed articles including research, analyses, and commentaries from leading researchers and scholars, analysts, industry experts, and health and health care stakeholders. Some papers will provide an overview of an issue relevant to NCDs, but we are particularly interested in empirical analyses of specific policies, care models, and other approaches to addressing NCDs. All papers must focus on issues of interest to public policy makers and private leaders in health care and related sectors.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: The Bottom Line On Different Management Models In State Health Exchanges


December 17th, 2014

The Affordable Care Act gives states discretion as to how they design their health insurance Marketplaces. Some states run their own Marketplace; others are part of the federally facilitated exchange; and a few chose a state-federal partnership. All states have plan management responsibilities, and if a state runs its own Marketplace, it has management choices. A “clearinghouse” model of management is when all health plans meeting published criteria are accepted into the exchange.

This model is used by some state-run exchanges and all the state-federal partnerships and federally facilitated exchanges. The alternative is the “active purchasing” model, allowing a state to directly negotiate premiums, provider networks, and other details. This model has been adopted by ten of the seventeen state-run exchanges.

A new study, released today as a Web First by Health Affairs, found that in the 2013–14 open enrollment period, state-based Marketplaces using a clearinghouse model had significantly lower adjusted average premiums for all plans within each metal tier (bronze, silver, and gold) compared to state-based Marketplaces having active purchasing models. This study offers the first attempt to assess the premium differences across Marketplace models.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


December 9th, 2014

Last week, Hank Stern at InsureBlog provided us with a “post-turkey day” edition of the Health Wonk Review. Included in Hank’s nice round-up is a Health Affairs Blog post by Suzanne Delbanco summarizing the lessons learned from her series here on payment reform.

Read the rest of this entry »

Children’s Health: Health Affairs’ December Issue


December 8th, 2014

The December issue of Health Affairs includes a number of studies examining current threats to the health and health care of America’s children, and what can be done to meet their needs within an ever-evolving health care system. Some of the subjects covered: the role of Medicaid in reducing early-term elective deliveries; how pediatric services are covered in the state insurance Marketplaces; Medicaid spending on children with complex medical conditions; and the effect of abuse and neglect on children’s health and school engagement.

This issue of Health Affairs is supported by The W.K. Kellogg Foundation as well as by the Children’s Hospital Association, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Nemours, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, and The Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Event Reminder: Children’s Health


December 4th, 2014

Threats to children’s health have changed dramatically over the past few generations, but America’s health care system has been slow to transform to meet children’s evolving needs. The December 2014 thematic issue of Health Affairs examines the current state of children’s health, health care delivery, and coverage.

You are invited to join us on Monday, December 8, at a forum featuring authors from the new issue at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.  Panels will cover financing, delivery, access, and the social determinants of children’s health, and spotlight innovative programs that are making a difference.

WHEN: 
Monday, December 8, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE: 
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC, 13th Floor

REGISTER NOW!

Follow live tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_ChildHealth. 

See the full agenda. Among the confirmed speakers are:

Read the rest of this entry »

Click here to email us a new post.