Learn more about Jeff Goldsmith

Jeff Goldsmith (tcoyote@msn.com) is president of Health Futures Inc. and Associate Professor of Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia. He is also the author of a book released this year titled “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: How Imaging is Reshaping Health Care” (Oxford U. Press), coauthored with Bruce Hillman, MD.


Health Futures specializes in corporate strategic planning and forecasting future health care trends. For 25 years Health Futures (http://www.healthfutures.net/) has analyzed issues facing the healthcare industry, including the future of information technology and healthcare; implications of new biotechnology developments; health care trend analysis; the internet’s impact on medicine; the future of managed care and of integrated health systems.


Recent Posts by Jeff Goldsmith

Pioneer ACOs: Anatomy Of A ‘Victory’

If the HHS Secretary’s goal of having 50 percent of regular Medicare’s payments come through “Alternative Payment Methodologies” by 2018 is to be met, that growth is unlikely to come from either the Pioneer ACOs or the larger Medicare Shared Savings Program.

An Interview With George Halvorson: The Kaiser Permanente Renaissance, And Health Reform’s Unfinished Business

For decades, health policymakers considered Kaiser Permanente the lode star of delivery system reform.  Yet by the end of 1999, the nation’s oldest and largest group model HMO had experienced almost three years of significant operating losses, the first in the plan’s history. It was struggling...

How Much Market Power Do Hospital Systems Have?

Sometimes big game hunters find frustration when their prey moves by the time they’ve lined up to blast it. That certainly appears to be the case with the health policy target de jour: whether providers, hospital systems in particular, exert too much market power. A recent cluster of papers in...

Primum Non Nocere: Congress’s Inadequate Medicare Physician Payment Fix

Editor's note: You can read other perspectives on the Medicare physician payment reform pending in Congress in Health Affairs and Health Affairs Blog (here, here and here). Partisan gridlock in Washington regarding health policy has been so pervasive and bitter that any bipartisan...

Pioneer ACOs’ Disappointing First Year

On July 16, the CMS Innovation Center reported the first year results for the Pioneer ACO program: 13 Pioneers, or about 40 percent of the participants, earned bonuses. The program saved the Medicare program a gross $87.6 million before bonus distributions, cutting the rate of growth in...

Health Industry Price Inflation At Historical Low

One hesitates to make too much of a single report, but the Altarum Institute’s July Report, “Health Care Price Growth at 20+ Year Low,” certainly commands one’s attention. According to Altarum’s analysis, the health sector pricing trend ran at a 1.0 percent annual rate in May 2013, lowest...

Practice Redesign Isn’t Going To Erase The Primary Care Shortage

Most experts agree that primary care needs to be re-invented. There are a lot of promising ingredients of practice redesign: better scheduling, electronic medical records with patient portals, redesigned clinician workflow, and work sharing. Linda Green’s intriguing article in the January...

Where Is Health Spending Headed? Some Reactions To The CMS Report

For the third year in a row, national health spending in 2011 grew less than 4 percent, according to the CMS Office of the Actuary. However, the report said modest rebounds in pharmaceutical spending and physician visits pointed toward an acceleration of costs in 2012 and beyond. CMS’s...

Behind The Uninsured Numbers, A Diminishing Sense Of Urgency

After a summer of disappointing economic news, the recent Census report on the uninsured was a rare bit of sunshine. The number of uninsured Americans declined by about 3 percent, or 1.34 million, to 48.6 million in 2011. This was the largest one-year numerical decline in twelve years. There...

Health Care: An Alternate Economic Universe

In July, 2012, the US economy produced roughly the same volume of goods and services as it did five years earlier with five million fewer workers.  Yet, during the first four years of the recession (May 2007 to May 2011), the US health system, despite slowing or declining utilization, added...