Learn more about Arthur Kellermann

Arthur Kellermann is Dean of the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences – “America’s Medical School.” He previously held the Paul O’Neill–Alcoa Chair in Policy Analysis at the RAND Corporation. For 17 years, he held various positions at Emory University including associate dean of health policy in the Emory School of Medicine, founding chair of Emory’s Department of Emergency Medicine and founding director of the Emory Center for Injury Control. A member of the Institute of Medicine he has served on several IOM committees examining aspects of public health, emergency care and health policy. He earned a master’s degree in public health from the University of Washington and a medical degree from Emory University.


Recent Posts by Arthur Kellermann

Does Public Health Have A Future?

Ebola’s arrival in the U.S. hit Americans with a jolt. Regardless of how you feel about the response to date, it should remind everyone of the importance of public health. Fortunately, public health in the U.S. has built an extraordinary track record of success. Smallpox, one of the most...

December 10, 2014Population Health, Public Health

Health Care Spending: What’s In Store?

In the May issue of Health Affairs, two teams of Harvard researchers asserted that the recent slowdown in health care spending could be the beginning of a trend that will lead to decreased health care costs. Their optimism is sharply at odds with the bleaker assessments contained in a recent...

Saving Grady: Reflections On Kate Neuhausen’s Narrative Matters Essay

In the past 12 years, several of our nation’s most storied public hospitals have closed, including DC General (2001), New Orleans’s Charity Hospital (2005), and Martin Luther King, Jr. hospital in Los Angeles (2007). When Atlanta’s Grady Memorial Hospital was featured on the front page of The...

A Health Care Entitlement Worth Ending

The “fiscal cliff” deal raised taxes on households earning more than $450,000 a year and sheltered everyone else from an automatic income tax increase. Tough decisions about spending were put off until March 1, the new deadline by which Congress must take deficit-cutting action if it is to...

February 27, 2013Costs and Spending, Payment Policy, Quality

Health Care Cost Growth Is Hurting Middle-Class Families

In the September, 2011 issue of Health Affairs, we examined the impact of a decade of health care cost growth on the income of a typical, median-income family of four with employer-sponsored health insurance. To recap, between 1999 and 2009, the middle-class family’s nominal monthly income...

Responding To Newtown

The horrific massacre of 27 children and adults in Newtown, Connecticut ranks second only to Virginia Tech among U.S. mass shootings. These tragedies are part of a lengthening list of mass killings in such varied places as a shopping mall, a movie theater, a Sikh Temple, a high school, a...

December 21, 2012Public Health