Ron Goetzel is Senior Scientist and Director of the Institute for Health and Productivity Studies (IHPS) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Vice President of Consulting and Applied Research for Truven Health Analytics, an IBM Company. The mission of the IHPS is to bridge the gap between academia, the business community, and the healthcare policy world – bringing academic resources into policy debates and day-to-day business decisions, and bringing health and productivity management issues into academia. Dr. Goetzel is responsible for leading innovative projects for healthcare purchaser, managed care, government, and pharmaceutical clients interested in conducting cutting-edge research focused on the relationship between health and well-being, medical costs, and work-related productivity. He is an internationally recognized and widely published expert in health and productivity management (HPM), return-on-investment (ROI), program evaluation, and outcomes research.


Recent Posts by Ron Goetzel

How Can The Government Improve Prevention Programs In The Workplace?

In a bipartisan manner, the federal government can play a significant role to engage the business community in building and sustaining workplace health promotion programs that work by improving employee health, reducing unnecessary spending on health care, and raising worker productivity.

The Value of Workplace Health Promotion (Wellness) Programs

The recent Health Affairs Blog post by Al Lewis, Vik Khanna, and Shana Montrose titled, “Workplace Wellness Produces No Savings” has triggered much interest and media attention. It highlights the controversy surrounding the value of workplace health promotion programs that 22 authors addressed...

Workplace Wellness Programs: Continuing The Discussion

Editor's note: One of the most-read Health Affairs articles last year was "Wellness Incentives In The Workplace: Cost Savings Through Cost Shifting To Unhealthy Workers," by Jill R. Horwitz,.Brenna D. Kelly, and John E. DiNardo. The article engendered a Health Affairs Blog discussion between...

Workplace Wellness Programs: Continuing The Discussion With Dinardo, Horwitz, And Kelly

This is a response to the DiNardo, Horwitz, and Kelly Health Affairs Blog post in which the authors replied to my previous commentary, “Structuring Legal, Ethical, and Practical Workplace Health Incentives: A Reply to Horwitz, Kelly, And DiNardo.” In my prior post, I highlighted my...

Structuring Legal, Ethical, And Practical Workplace Health Incentives: A Reply to Horwitz, Kelly, And DiNardo

This commentary is in response to the March 5, 2013 Health Affairs article, "Wellness Incentives in the Workplace: Cost Savings through Cost Shifting to Unhealthy Lifestyles." In that article, Jill Horwitz and coauthors express concerns about new rules governing workplace health promotion...

On Workplace Wellness, Don’t Throw The Baby Out With The Bath Water: A Reply To Lewis And Khanna

This commentary is in response to a January 16, 2013 Health Affairs Blog post entitled “Is It Time to Re-Examine Workplace Wellness ‘Get Well Quick’ Schemes?" by Al Lewis and Vik Khanna. After the initial blog appeared, my email box was filled with messages asking for a rebuttal to the initial...