Dr. Lisa Simpson is the president and chief executive officer of AcademyHealth. A nationally recognized health policy researcher and pediatrician, she is a passionate advocate for the translation of research into policy and practice. Her research focuses on improving the performance of the health care system and includes studies of the quality and safety of care, health and health care disparities and the health policy and system response to childhood obesity. Dr. Simpson has published more than 80 articles and commentaries in peer reviewed journals.


Before joining AcademyHealth, Dr. Simpson was director of the Child Policy Research Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and professor of pediatrics in the Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati. She served as the Deputy Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality from 1996 to 2002. Dr. Simpson serves on the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program National Advisory Council, and the Editorial boards for the Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research and Frontiers in Public Health Systems and Services Research. In October of 2013, Dr. Simpson was elected to the Institute of Medicine.


Dr. Simpson earned her undergraduate and medical degrees at Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland), a master’s in public health at the University of Hawaii, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in health services research and health policy at the University of California, San Francisco. She was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree by the Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies in 2013.


Recent Posts by Lisa Simpson

Will Evidence Matter In 2017?

As we move into the uncertainty that comes with every new administration and Congress, a key question is whether, and if so, how, evidence from research will inform this new era of health policy debates.

Breast Cancer Screening: Let Evidence Trump Fear

Once again, the United States Preventive Services Task Force’s latest draft report on the potential benefits and harms of mammography screening was met by outcries from radiologists and others, but evidence should trump fear.