Uwe Reinhardt is the James Madison Professor of Political Economy and Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. Recognized as one of the nation’s leading authorities on health care economics, Reinhardt has been a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences since 1978. He is a past president of the Association of Health Services Research. From 1986 to 1995 he served as a commissioner on the Physician Payment Review Committee, established in 1986 by Congress to advise it on issues related to the payment of physicians. He is a senior associate of the Judge Institute for Management of Cambridge University, UK, and a trustee of Duke University, and the Duke University Health System. Reinhardt is or was a member of numerous editorial boards, among them the Journal of Health Economics, the Milbank Memorial Quarterly, Health Affairs, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the Journal of the American Medical Association. Ph.D. Yale University.


Recent Posts by Uwe E. Reinhardt

Mylan’s CEO A Villain? Depends On Your Preferred Brand Of Capitalism

If Mylan can be faulted, it is on misjudging what ethical customs American society wishes to impose on for-profit business firms serving the health care industry. The current uproar over the company’s pricing policies, along with earlier outrages over Turing’s and Valeant’s pricing policies,...

‘Value Creation’ And ‘Value Shifting’ In Health Care

The public backlash to the pricing of high-value specialty drugs suggests American society is not comfortable with the idea of value pricing in health care. At its extreme, value pricing can extract enormous prices from seriously stricken patients or their insurers, because better health and...

Rethinking The Gruber Controversy: Americans Aren’t Stupid, But They’re Often Ignorant — And Why

M.I.T. economist Jonathan Gruber, whom his colleagues in the profession hold in very high esteem for his prowess in economic analysis, recently appeared before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. Gruber was called to explain several caustic remarks he had offered on tortured...

Unpacking The Meaning Of ‘Rationing’: A Response To Dowd And Allison

Bryan Dowd and Kirk Allison are to be thanked for their lengthy treatise on the word “rationing.” It is a term whose interpretation economists have left to politicians -- not invariably models of erudition. Check the subject index of introductory textbooks or even intermediary textbooks in...

Competing Visions: A Response to John Goodman

In his post “Why don’t Republicans Have a Vision for Health Reform” (April 2, 2013) John Goodman offers interesting comments on my earlier post “Reflections on The Federal Budget Resolutions” (March 21, 2013). I thank him for the comments. My post was focused strictly on the vision for U.S....

Reflections On The Federal Budget Resolutions

According to a process laid out in the Budget Act of 1974, the budget resolutions put forth by the House of Representatives and the Senate emerge as modifications, sometimes substantial, of the budget to be submitted by the first Monday in February by the President of the United...

Assessing The ‘Gang Of Six’ Deficit Reduction Plan

The “Bipartisan Plan to Reduce our Nation’s Deficits” developed by the “Gang of Six (or Seven)”, a group of Senators from both parties, certainly is not something I would brag about before a group of Princeton students who, I routinely tell them, will have to grow up quickly to clean up the...

Will More Insurers Control Health Care Costs Better?

A common theme among health reformers has been that the small-group and individual markets for health insurance are too concentrated and thus inadequately competitive. The proposed remedy is to have more independent insurers compete within local markets.  Reformers left of center on the...

Lessons From The Health Care Summit

Many journalists have called and asked me what I have learned from watching the much heralded Health Care Summit at Blair House. Actually quite a bit, as the discourse there crystallized so clearly the ideological division that makes coherent and comprehensive health reform so difficult in this...

Grading The President’s Health Care Speech

After decades of teaching, I view everything around me as a final exam and assign it letter grades. Naturally, I graded President Barack Obama’s speech as well. The overall grade is A–, a highly respectable grade at Princeton, although there is variation around this overall average for the...