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Good And Bad News For Diabetes Prevention In The Community


March 25th, 2015

The findings from a recent synthesis of the literature about the effectiveness of prevention initiatives focused on reducing the risk of Type 2 diabetes among high-risk populations (people already obese or inactive or diagnosed as having prediabetes) are largely encouraging.

The synthesis includes a comprehensive and systematic review of the medical, diabetes, and public health literature for evaluation studies of interventions published between 2002 and 2013. The search was undertaken using medical subject headings and keywords related to diabetes and its risk factors.

A number of interventions—such as the National Institutes for Health’s Diabetes Prevention Program and the Group Lifestyle Balance Program—focused on helping people eat better and become more physically active are effective in reducing the risk of diabetes onset. Robust studies show that these interventions work even better than medication to prevent diabetes.

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Implementing Health Reform: Final 2016 Letter To Federal Exchange Issuers


February 22nd, 2015

Each year the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) releases a letter to issuers (insurers) in the federally facilitated marketplace (FFM) setting out the ground rules for coverage through the FFM for the coming year.  A draft letter is published for comments, followed by the final letter.  The letter addresses insurers that issue qualified health plans (QHPs) in the FFM, including stand-alone dental plans (SADPs), and covers the small business (FF-SHOP) marketplace as well as the individual marketplace.

On December 19, 2014, CMS  published the draft 2016 letter which I covered here.  On February 20, 2015, CMS published the final letter to issuers in the federally facilitated marketplace.  Not surprisingly, since it  covers the third year of operation of the marketplace, the 2016 letter is quite similar to those of preceding years.   The letter is based on previously published rules governing QHPs and the marketplaces, as well as on the final 2016 Benefit and Payment Parameters Rule, covered here (CITE) and here (CITE), from which it incorporates many provisions.

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Implementing Health Reform: 2016 Benefit And Payment Final Rule, Consumer & Provider Provisions


February 22nd, 2015

On February 20, 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the Department of Health and Human Services published its massive Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters (BPP rule) for 2016 Final Rule, accompanied by a fact sheet.  This rule addresses a host of issues involving the continuing implementation of the Affordable Care Act for 2016.  A few provisions, however, affect the 2015 year as well and a number of provisions will not be implemented until 2017.

The BPP rule amends and updates existing rules; thus, it must be read in tandem with rules that have been promulgated earlier, which are catalogued in the preface to the rule.

CMS released also on February 20 its Final 2016 Letter to Issuers (Insurers) in the Federally-Facilitated Marketplace (FFM).   This letter sets the ground rules for insurer participation in the FFM for 2016 and covers many of the same topics covered by the BPP rule.

These documents are very lengthy and will be covered in three posts over the next few days.  This first post will focus on issues in the BPP rule that directly affect consumers.  The second post will focus more on issues that affect health plans.  The third post will examine the letter to issuers.

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New Narrative Matters: How Access, Knowledge, And Attitudes Shaped My Sister’s Care


February 6th, 2015

Health Affairs‘ February Narrative Matters essay features a woman who helps her sister get the care she needs when a tooth infection turns into a health emergency. Elizabeth Piatt’s article is freely available to all readers, or you can listen to the podcast.

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Exhibit Of The Month: California’s Hospital Fair Pricing Act Reduces Amount Paid By Uninsured


January 29th, 2015

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Monthseries. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month’s exhibit, published in the January issue of Health Affairs, looks at the proportion of hospital charges to and collections from uninsured patients in California from 2003 to 2012.

In the article, “California’s Hospital Fair Pricing Act Reduced The Prices Actually Paid By Uninsured Patients,” author Ge Bai of the Williams School of Commerce, Economics, and Politics at Washington and Lee University, examines how the Hospital Fair Pricing Act affects the net price paid by uninsured patients.

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Health Affairs Web First: Do Low-Income Consumers In Medicaid Opt-Out States Pay More Out Of Pocket?


January 28th, 2015

In the twenty-three states currently not expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), uninsured adults who would have been eligible for that program and have incomes at or above poverty are now generally eligible for subsidies to purchase health coverage in their state’s Marketplace exchange. How would out-of-pocket costs in the Marketplace compare with Medicaid coverage for this group of low-income Americans living in states not expanding Medicaid?

This study, being released by Health Affairs as a Web First, estimated these costs under two simulation scenarios: calculating out-of-pocket costs for families covered by a subsidized silver Marketplace plan and comparing that with coverage under Medicaid. Author Steven Hill found that Medicaid would more than halve these adults’ average annual family out-of-pocket spending ($938 versus $1,948).

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Additional Requirements For Charitable Hospitals: Final Rules On Community Health Needs Assessments And Financial Assistance


January 23rd, 2015

On December 29, the Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service released long-awaited final regulations implementing Affordable Care Act provisions that impose additional obligations on charitable hospital organizations covered by §501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.  Published in the Federal Register on December 31 2014, the regulations are massive, consolidating a series of prior proposals into a single final body of regulatory law.  The regulations affect more than 80 percent of U.S. hospitals, both the 60 percent that operate as private nonprofit entities and the 23 percent that operate as governmental units.

Because state and local governments typically condition their own sales, property, and corporate income tax exemptions for nonprofit entities to a hospital’s §501(c)(3) status, the final regulations carry broad and deep implications from both a policy and financial perspective.  According to the Congressional Budget Office the 2002 the national value of the federal tax exemption exceeded $12 billion, a figure that undoubtedly has risen considerably.

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Graduate Medical Education: The Need For New Leadership In Governance And Financing


January 14th, 2015

With the creation of the Medicare program in 1965, a funding stream was established to support the training of medical residents who provided care for Medicare beneficiaries. In subsequent years, Medicare has maintained these payments to teaching hospitals and remains the largest payer for Graduate Medical Education (GME), with expenditures totaling about $10 billion annually. This represents two-thirds of Federal GME support, with another $4 billion per year provided to hospitals through State Medicaid GME support.

This expenditure was a major motivation for the Senate Finance Committee to request the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to issue a report entitled “Graduate Medical Education That Meets the Nation’s Health Needs.”  The Report proposed major reforms to create a GME system with greater transparency, accountability and strategic direction, in order to increase its contribution to achieving the nation’s health goals. Prior to publication of this long awaited report on July 29, 2014, GME financing policies received substantial attention in the last two sessions of Congress, with a particular focus on increasing the number of federally funded GME positions. The House and Senate committees with GME jurisdiction produced multiple legislative initiatives.

However, there was considerable opposition from primary care stakeholders to some of the proposed changes because of inadequate emphasis on ambulatory training. Possible redistribution of Medicare GME funding was also of concern to many. This seemed to dissuade Congress from passing reform of GME policies. Nevertheless, 1,500 new GME positions were authorized in the recent Veterans Health Administration legislation.

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Rethinking The Gruber Controversy: Americans Aren’t Stupid, But They’re Often Ignorant — And Why


December 29th, 2014

M.I.T. economist Jonathan Gruber, whom his colleagues in the profession hold in very high esteem for his prowess in economic analysis, recently appeared before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. Gruber was called to explain several caustic remarks he had offered on tortured language and provisions in the Affordable Care Act (the ACA) that allegedly were designed to fool American voters into accepting the ACA.

Many of these linguistic contortions, however, were designed not so much to fool voters, but to force the Congressional Budget Office into scoring taxes as something else. But Gruber did call the American public “stupid” enough to be misled by such linguistic tricks and by other measures in the ACA — for example, taxing health insurers knowing full well that insurers would pass the tax on to the insured.

During the hearing, Gruber apologized profusely and on multiple occasions for his remarks. Although at least some economists apparently see no warrant for such an apology, I believe it was appropriate, as in hindsight Gruber does as well. “Stupid” is entirely the wrong word in this context; Gruber should have said “ignorant” instead.

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Transforming Rural Health Care: High-Quality, Sustainable Access To Specialty Care


December 5th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is also authored by Kate Samuels, a project manager at Brookings. It is informed by a case study, the fourth  in a series made possible through the Merkin Initiative on Physician Payment Reform and Clinical Leadership, a special project to develop clinician leadership in health care delivery and financing reform. The case study will be presented on Monday, December 8 using a “MEDTalk” format featuring live story-telling and knowledge-sharing from patients, providers, and policymakers.

Health care for patients in rural communities across the United States remains a unique challenge.  Despite many programs aimed at improving access to physicians and hospitals, access to health care providers remains limited.  While 19.3 percent of Americans live in a rural area, only about 10 percent of physicians practice in rural areas.  Similarly, 65 percent of all Health Professional Shortage Areas are in rural areas.  Rural residents often face long travel distances to see a specialist after what can be months waiting for an appointment.

Even in areas where rural primary care providers (PCPs) remain committed and engaged in the community, often having been raised and educated there, these providers often lack close connections to specialists who tend to be based in larger, urban academic medical centers (AMC).  The result is a worsening gap in specialty care access, in turn leading to a deteriorative effect on rural provider morale and retention.

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Collaborating On A Culture Of Health: Buncombe County, North Carolina


December 2nd, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing series written for Health Affairs Blog by local leaders from communities honored with the annual Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Prize. In 2014, six winning communities were selected by RWJF from more than 250 applicants and celebrated for placing a priority on health and creating powerful partnerships to drive change.

Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains, at the junction of the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers, Asheville, N.C. is graced with natural beauty and an abundance of health and economic resources. But in 2012, many residents of Asheville and the surrounding Buncombe County area were struggling with poverty and chronic illness. So the community responded as advocates, public health experts, community leaders, and business leaders came together to establish a culture of health.

As County Health Director Gibbie Harris explained, “the thing that is really driving us forward is an interest in being the healthiest community in the country… We have people who are interested in social justice, and a desire to improve the lives of our friends and neighbors.”

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Exhibit Of The Month: Maps Tell Powerful Stories About Children, Neighborhoods, And Possible Policy Solutions


November 25th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Month” series. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

Maps and health have been powerfully intertwined since nineteenth-century British physician John Snow produced a hand-drawn map that famously showed a correlation between the locations where cholera was killing hundreds of Londoners during an 1854 epidemic and the Broad Street pump where locals unknowingly drew water contaminated with the deadly bacterium.

Fast-forward to the twenty-first century, and maps that tell compelling stories about health, policy, and place are ubiquitous. If Snow were alive today, no doubt his stethoscope would be spinning.

The power and art of mapping, geospatial analysis, and health policy research are regularly featured in Health Affairs, but never before to the extent in the journal’s November issue. Four research papers give readers five maps that depict meaningful findings about children, low-income neighborhoods, and other local characteristics that affect health and offer valuable insights for policy makers.

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New On GrantWatch Blog


November 21st, 2014

Health Affairs GrantWatch Blog brings you news and views of what foundations are funding in health policy and health care.

Here are the most recent posts:

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The Case For Advancing Access To Health Coverage And Care For Immigrant Women And Families


November 19th, 2014

Before the end of the year, the Obama administration is expected to announce that millions of undocumented immigrants will be able to lawfully stay in the United States. The new Congress may also take action on immigration reform legislation. Regardless of how it happens, any immigration policy change presents a good opportunity to revisit what has gone wrong with insurance coverage and health care for millions of immigrants, both undocumented and lawfully present, living and working in communities across the country.

A web of policy barriers to public and private insurance options effectively keeps millions of immigrant women and their families from affordable coverage and the basic health care—including sexual and reproductive health services—that coverage makes possible. Removing these barriers would advance the health and economic well-being of immigrant women, their families, and society as a whole. Most immediately, administrative steps advancing access for even some immigrants would be an important step forward. The case for doing so is compelling.

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Challenges For People With Disabilities Within The Health Care Safety Net


November 18th, 2014

Medicare and Medicaid were passed to serve as safety nets for the country’s most vulnerable populations, a point that has been reemphasized by the expansion of the populations they serve, especially with regards to Medicaid. Yet, even after 50 years, the disabled population continues to be one whose health care needs are not being met. This community is all too frequently left to suffer health disparities due to cultural incompetency, stigma and misunderstanding, and an inability to create policy changes that cover the population as a whole and their acute and long-term needs.

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Social Services And Community Health: Health Affairs’ November Issue


November 3rd, 2014

The November issue of Health Affairs includes a number of studies looking at how social services and community support programs can improve the health of local residents. Other subjects covered: the potential for pay-for-performance payment models to create a market that values health, not just health care; how one safety-net accountable care organization is uniquely improving care coordination; a three-year progress report on a regional health collaborative; and more.

This issue of Health Affairs is supported by The Kresge Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. It will be discussed at a Wednesday, November 5 briefing at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

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Poverty’s Association With Poor Health Outcomes and Health Disparities


October 30th, 2014

A recent ecological study by Carl Stevens, David Schriger, Brian Raffetto, Anna Davis, David Zingmond, and Dylan H. Roby, published in the August issue of Health Affairs, showed significant associations between neighborhood poverty and diabetes-related lower extremity amputations (LEA) in the state of California, which adds to the growing evidence that where you live (not just how you live) may directly impact your health.

The authors linked data from multiple sources (i.e. California Health Information Survey, Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, health facility discharge data) and used geographic information system (GIS) analyses and regression analyses to identify amputation “hot spots” and uncovered a 10-fold variation in LEA rates between low-income and high-income neighborhoods.

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Study Draws Misleading Conclusions Regarding 340B Program


October 23rd, 2014

After reading Rena Conti and Peter Bach’s recent study on hospitals’ purported misuse of the 340B Drug Discount Program, published in the October issue of Health Affairs, I had two questions:  first, how are the authors substantiating their conclusions? Second, what kind of sensational sound bites are going to come from this?

These are the questions that responsible researchers must ask themselves so there is not a false representation of what they did, what they found, and how the actual findings compare to their research intentions. Researchers have to be equally precise in both their statistical analysis AND in the discussion of the results.

I was tempted to run through several counterpoints that my 15 years of 340B policy and research experience yields, but was tempered by both the word count limitations on a blog post and the straightforwardness of my main objection. Simply put, the authors’ conclusions are not substantiated by the data collected. Conti and Bach say that they “found” that hospitals “served communities that were wealthier and had higher rates of insurance” and “generated profits.” They did not find this.

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Tax-Exempt Status For Nonprofit Hospitals Under The ACA: Where Are The Final Treasury/IRS Rules?


October 23rd, 2014

Months have now stretched into years, and there still remains no sign of final Treasury/IRS regulations interpreting the Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s provisions covering the expanded obligations of nonprofit hospitals that seek tax-exempt status under §501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

The ACA amendments do not depend on formal agency policy to take effect. Nonetheless, Congress directed the Treasury Secretary to issue regulations and guidance necessary to carry out the reforms (26 U.S.C. §501(r)(7)). To this end, two important sets of proposed rules were issued: the first in June, 2012; and the second, in April 2013. While an informative IRS website lists various proposed rules and guidelines important to nonprofit hospitals, final rules seem to have performed a disappearing act.

Apparently recognizing the problems created by its delays, the agency has gone so far as to issue a special Notice letting nonprofit hospitals (and presumably the public) know that they can rely on its proposed rules. But this assurance overlooks the fact that the proposed rules themselves contained crucial areas in which final agency policy has not yet been adopted.

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Teaching Health Centers: An Attainable, Near-Term Pathway To Expand Graduate Medical Education


October 17th, 2014

Stakeholders in Graduate Medical Education (GME) and members of Congress eagerly anticipated the long delayed but recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) GME report. While perceptively characterizing the defects in our GME system, recommendations of the report generated substantial controversy among participants at a recent GME forum hosted by Health Affairs. The IOM proposed limited and gradual changes in Medicare GME financing, but the lack of support for GME expansion was not well received by some.

At present there are multiple legislative GME proposals, but none has gained broad support among the various stakeholders. Congressional committees responsible for GME funding view this lack of consensus among GME stakeholders as a major obstacle.

We describe a near-term and attainable pathway to expand GME that could gain consensus among these stakeholders. This approach would sustain and expand Teaching Health Centers (THCs), a recent initiative that directly funds community-based GME sponsoring institutions to train residents in primary care specialties, dentistry and psychiatry. We further propose selectively expanding GME to meet primary care and other demonstrable specialty needs within communities, and building in evaluations to measure effectiveness of innovative training models.

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