Blog Home

Archive for the 'Global Health' Category




New On GrantWatch Blog


November 21st, 2014

Health Affairs GrantWatch Blog brings you news and views of what foundations are funding in health policy and health care.

Here are the most recent posts:

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: In 11-Country Survey Of Older Adults, Americans Are Sickest But Have Quickest Access To Specialists


November 20th, 2014

A new survey of the health and care experiences of older adults in eleven different countries, released recently as a Web First by Health Affairs, found that Americans were sicker than their counterparts abroad, with 68 percent of respondents living with two or more chronic conditions and 53 percent taking four or more medications. Also, Americans were most likely to report cost-related expenses for care (19 percent of respondents) than residents in any of the other countries surveyed.

On the other hand, the United States compared favorably in some aspects: For example, 83 percent of US respondents had a treatment plan they could carry out in their daily life, one of the highest rates across the surveyed countries.

A few other key findings:

Read the rest of this entry »

Analysis Of Medicare Spending Slowdown Leads Health Affairs Blog October Most-Read List


November 17th, 2014

Loren Adler and Adam Rosenberg’s examination of the causes of slower Medicare spending growth was the most-read Health Affairs Blog post in October. Their post was followed by Jeff Goldsmith’s interview with former Kaiser Permanente CEO George Halvorson.

Next on the top-ten list was J. Stephen Morrison’s look at the US response to Ebola and the role of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Tom Frieden, followed by Tim Jost’s post on reference pricing and network adequacy.

The full list is below:

Read the rest of this entry »

Using Mobile Technology To Overcome Jurisdictional Challenges To A Coordinated Immunization Policy


November 14th, 2014

On March 20, 2014, the Government of Canada and the federal Minister of Health announced the release of ImmunizeCanada (ImmunizeCA), a smart phone application (app) designed to both provide accurate information on immunization for Canadians and allow them to track their and their family members’ immunizations. Based on a prototype developed for parents in Ontario and in partnership with the Canadian Public Health Association, our development team received funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada to build a national immunization app. Our task was to build an Apple- and Android-compatible app, containing all 13 provincial/territorial schedules and vaccine information from each jurisdiction in both Canadian official languages (French and English).

The application uses demographic information entered by the user and the most recent recommended provincial vaccination schedule to create a custom profile for multiple family members. It allows parents to track and carry their children’s immunizations records on their mobile device. The application also permits the creation of adult-specific schedules and includes information on travel vaccines. It is also possible to sync the app with your smartphone calendar, generate appointment reminders, print or share an immunization record by email, and access answers to common questions.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


November 14th, 2014

A belated hat tip to Wing of Zock, where Jennifer Salopek produced a great Health Wonk Review last week. In her “election week edition,” Jennifer gives an overview of many insightful posts, including a Health Affairs Blog post by Lawrence Gostin on the United States’ misguided self-interest on ebola.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: For Global Health Programs Aiding Developing Countries, Analyzing A New Funding Model


November 13th, 2014

Development assistance for health in low-and-middle-income countries nearly tripled from 2001 to 2010, with much of that growth directed toward the response to HIV. Donor agencies struggle to determine how much assistance a country should receive. A new study, recently released as a Health Affairs Web First, presents three allocation methodologies to align funding with priorities.

The study authors Victoria Fan, Amanda Glassman, and Rachel Silverman then select a model—one with enough flexibility to solve mismatches between disease burdens and allocations—to evaluate the progress that could be made by one organization—the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria—in fighting HIV. The authors found that under the new funding model, substantial shifts in the Global Fund’s portfolio are likely to result from concentrating resources in countries with more HIV cases and lower per capita income.

Read the rest of this entry »

The United States’ Misguided Self-Interest On Ebola


October 31st, 2014

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is spiraling out of control. The international community allowed a manageable outbreak to mushroom into a health and humanitarian crisis. The World Health Organization (WHO) has been enfeebled and largely sidelined. Belatedly, the United States sent military troops into Liberia and spearheaded a United Nations Security Council resolution. Yet since isolated Ebola cases have appeared on our shores, the US has begun to look inward, at risk of falling into a trap that I will call “misguided self-interest.”

While the West African epidemic rages, the US delayed significant action until long after the unprecedented nature of the Ebola epidemic became clear, and even now the response is incommensurate with the massive need. Now we are transferring our gaze from the real crisis and headed on an insular journey.

I grant the premise that a country’s first responsibility is to protect its inhabitants. But calls for a travel ban from the region and newly announced state quarantine policies that would ensnare travelers from affected countries appear selfish. To put it in perspective, the US has experienced only a few domestically diagnosed cases, with an exceedingly low risk of an outbreak.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: Vietnam’s Health Care System, Explained By Its Minister Of Health


October 30th, 2014

In August, Vietnam’s Minister of Health, Nguyen Thi Kim Tien, was interviewed for Health Affairs by Tsung-Mei Cheng, recently released as a Health Affairs Web First.

Among the topics discussed was an overview of the unique characteristics of Vietnam’s health system; its strengths and weaknesses; health financing reform aimed at reaching the goal of universal health coverage; the prevention and control of infectious diseases; and how Vietnam has performed in achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

Cheng is a health policy research analyst at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, in New Jersey. Health Affairs has previously published Cheng’s interviews with other world health ministers, including Thomas Zeltner of Switzerland (2010) and Chen Zhu of China (2012).

Read the rest of this entry »

Ebola And EHRs: An Unfortunate And Critical Reminder


October 28th, 2014

The Dallas hospital communication lapse that led to the discharge of a Liberian man with Ebola symptoms is an example of the failure of American health care system to effectively share health information, even within single institutions. It is not possible to know whether a faster response would have saved Thomas Eric Duncan’s life or reduced risk to the community and health workers.

What is clear is that rapid sharing of information is one of the elements critical to halting the spread of Ebola. Had all members of the initial care team known of the patient’s recent arrival from an Ebola-stricken country and acted appropriately to quarantine Mr. Duncan, this would have limited the chance of exposing the public and enabled faster preventive protocols for treating personnel.

Read the rest of this entry »

Lessons from Ebola: The Infectious Disease Era, And The Need To Prepare, Will Never Be Over


October 28th, 2014

With the wall-to-wall news coverage of Ebola recently, it’s hard for many to distinguish fact from fiction and to really understand the risk the disease poses and how prepared we are to fight it.

Fighting infectious diseases requires constant vigilance. Along with Ebola, health officials around the globe are closely watching other emerging threats: MERS-CoV, pandemic flu strains, Marburg, Chikungunya and Enterovirus D68. The best defense to all of these threats is a good offense — detecting, treating and containing as quickly and effectively as possible.

And yet, we have consistently degraded our ability to respond to these new, emerging and re-emerging threats by underfunding and undercutting existing capabilities and expecting the country to ramp up overnight when new threats emerge.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


October 24th, 2014

Louise Norris at Colorado Health Insurance Insider provides this week’s “falling leaves” edition of the Health Wonk Review. Jennifer’s insightful read includes a Health Affairs Blog post from J. Stephen Morrison on the U.S. Ebola response and the role of CDC head Thomas Friedan.

Read the rest of this entry »

Resources Don’t Solve Design Flaws


October 21st, 2014

The first three sessions of a conference I recently attended tackled some complex and important questions: How do we extend health insurance to people such as migrant and informal workers who don’t fit neatly into mainstream coverage programs? As we increase our investment in primary care, how do we assure that the performance of the primary care system is at the highest possible level? What types of evidence should we use as we make decisions in a dynamic health care system with limited opportunities for “gold standard” randomized controlled trials?

These are excellent questions, and they were perfect topics for a cutting-edge conference discussing the challenges facing the U.S. health care system.

But this conference was not about the U.S. health care system. These were opening “satellite” sessions at the Third Global Symposium on Health Systems Research held in Cape Town, South Africa.

Read the rest of this entry »

Thomas Frieden And The U.S. Ebola Response


October 20th, 2014

On Friday, October 17, the White House named Ron Klain the new Ebola czar. This move followed a storm of criticism in the media, on Capitol Hill, and elsewhere. The criticism focused on the multiple mistakes made by the U.S. agencies and Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas in the weeks since Thomas Eric Duncan, infected with Ebola, arrived in the United States on September 19. Duncan set off a disturbing train of events that included secondary infections of two nurses, Nina Pham and Amber Vinson, along with the lingering threat of additional infections.

That threat widened rapidly over the course of this past week. Dozens of health workers in Dallas remain under some form of quarantine or very close monitoring. Contact tracing revealed 300 persons who had possibly come in contact with Vinson during her Columbus Day weekend travel from Dallas to Cleveland and back. Schools were subsequently shuttered in Ohio and Texas.

Most remarkable, within a month the controversy surrounding the threat of Ebola to Americans had mushroomed into a political emergency for the Obama presidency itself, only a few tense weeks before the November 4 elections. Calls escalated for the appointment of an Ebola czar and a travel ban on persons originating in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, the root sources of the Ebola emergency. A special measure of criticism was reserved for the Obama administration’s lead face in the U.S. response, Dr. Thomas Frieden, head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In the words of one observer, this week became full of “recriminations, political showboating… and panicked overreactions.”

Read the rest of this entry »

500 Days And Counting: Critical Steps In The Countdown To Achieving MDG 6


October 6th, 2014

Editor’s note: For more on global health, see the September issue of Health Affairs.

We are now less than 500 days away from December 31, 2015, the target date for reaching the world’s Millennium Development Goals (MDG). This includes MDG 6, the goal of combatting HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases.

Astonishing progress has been made to date (as mentioned previously in our Health Affairs Blog post): AIDS-related deaths have fallen 35 percent since their peak in 2005; global mortality from tuberculosis has fallen by 45 percent since 1990; and global malaria mortality rates dropped 42 percent globally between 2000 and 2012. The key, of course, is maintaining this momentum in order to reach our goal.

It’s certainly no small task. But, three immediate steps can and must be taken:

  1. Enhance cost efficiencies;
  2. Build and strengthen partnerships; and
  3. Translate scientific developments into practice.
Read the rest of this entry »

Is A Study Of HIV Treatment For Mothers In Africa Unethical?


October 1st, 2014

A global health controversy erupted this summer when the prominent scientific journal Nature ran an article entitled “HIV trial attacked.” Within, commentators squared off over whether a huge ongoing study provides suboptimal and thus unethical treatment options to mothers with HIV in the developing world.

The multinational PROMISE study (for Promoting Maternal and Infant Survival Everywhere) is enrolling thousands of pregnant women with HIV in hopes of comparing mortality and other clinical outcomes between mothers who receive lifelong HIV therapy to mothers who receive shorter treatment durations if they have less advanced HIV disease.

Read the rest of this entry »

Exhibit Of The Month: Mental Health Spending On A Global Scale


September 29th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Month” series. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month’s exhibit, published in the September global health issue of Health Affairs, looks at budget allocation for mental health services by country income level.

In the article, “Policy Actions To Achieve Integrated Community-Based Mental Health Services,” authors Mary DeSilva, Chiara Samele, Shekhar Saxena, Vikram Patel, and Ara Darzi write that “most low-income countries allocate about 0.5 percent of their already small health budgets to the treatment and prevention of mental health problems.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Global Health Update: High Bed Occupancy Rates And Increased Mortality In Denmark


September 24th, 2014

High levels of bed occupancy are associated with increased inpatient and thirty-day hospital mortality in Denmark, according to research recently published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

Authors Flemming Madsen, Steen Ladelund, and Allan Linneberg received considerable media attention in Denmark for their research findings. For one major Television channel, it topped Germany’s victory in the World Cup finals.

In another story from the Danish newspaper, Information, Councillor Ulla Astman, Chairman of the North Denmark Regional Council and second highest ranking politician, who runs all of the Danish public hospitals, reportly stated that “we have to live with it [the increased mortality],” since they cannot afford to reduce bed occupancy.

“Or die with it,” said lead author Madsen, a pulmonary physician and director of the Allergy and Lung Clinic in Helsingør, Denmark, at the July 9 Health Affairs briefing, “Using Big Data To Transform Care.” Madsen, who left his position as director of the Department of Internal Medicine at Frederiksberg Hospital in Copenhagen to pursue this research, believes that Astman’s statement explains why they have a bed shortage problem and supports his argument that bed shortage is a result of planning.

“It is dangerous to focus on productivity without looking at the consequences,” says Madsen.

Read the rest of this entry »

Think and Act Globally: Health Affairs’ September Issue


September 8th, 2014

The September issue of Health Affairs emphasizes lessons learned from developing and industrialized nations collectively seeking the elusive goals of better care, with lower costs and higher quality. A number of studies analyze key global trends including patient engagement and integrated care, while others examine U.S.-based policy changes and their applicability overseas.

This issue was supported by the Qatar Foundation and World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH), Hamad Medical Corporation, Imperial College London, and The Commonwealth Fund.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Event Reminder: Advancing Global Health Policy


September 5th, 2014

Please join us on Monday, September 8, when Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil will host a briefing to discuss our September 2014 thematic issue, “Advancing Global Health Policy.” In an expansion of last year’s theme, “The ‘Triple Aim’ Goes Global,” we explore how developing and industrialized countries around the world are confronting challenges and learning from each other on three aims: cost, quality, and population health.

A highlight of the event will be a discussion of international health policy—led by Weil—featuring former CMS and FDA administrator and current Brookings Institution Senior Fellow Mark McClellan and Lord Ara Darzi, surgeon, scholar, and former UK Health Minister. Additional panels will look at how countries are transforming chronic care, lowering costs, and redesigning delivery systems.

WHEN: 
Monday, September 8, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE: 
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC, 13th Floor

REGISTER NOW!

Follow Live Tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_GlobalHealth.

If you can’t come in person (we hope you will!), you can watch the webcast of the event.

Read the rest of this entry »

Partnership And Progress On The Path To Achieving Millennium Development Goal 6


August 25th, 2014

Editor’s note: For more on global health, stay tuned for the upcoming September issue of Health Affairs.

In 2000, nearly 200 world leaders came together and agreed on a set of objectives intended to tackle some of the most pressing development challenges of our time, such as poverty, AIDS, and child mortality. With a target date of December 31, 2015, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) provided a clear path for progress and a platform for immediate action. Last week, on August 18, we reached a milestone on that path –- as of that date, 500 days remained to achieve these eight goals. So where do we stand, and what more must be done?

Combatting HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Other Diseases

For those of us focused acutely on MDG number 6—combatting HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases—the recent Millennium Development Goals Report had encouraging news. An estimated 3.3 million deaths from malaria were averted between 2000 and 2012 due to the expansion of malaria interventions, and efforts to fight tuberculosis have saved an estimated 22 million lives since 1995.

Read the rest of this entry »

Click here to email us a new post.