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Health Affairs Web First: Vietnam’s Health Care System, Explained By Its Minister Of Health


October 30th, 2014

In August, Vietnam’s Minister of Health, Nguyen Thi Kim Tien, was interviewed for Health Affairs by Tsung-Mei Cheng, recently released as a Health Affairs Web First.

Among the topics discussed was an overview of the unique characteristics of Vietnam’s health system; its strengths and weaknesses; health financing reform aimed at reaching the goal of universal health coverage; the prevention and control of infectious diseases; and how Vietnam has performed in achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

Cheng is a health policy research analyst at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, in New Jersey. Health Affairs has previously published Cheng’s interviews with other world health ministers, including Thomas Zeltner of Switzerland (2010) and Chen Zhu of China (2012).

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Ebola And EHRs: An Unfortunate And Critical Reminder


October 28th, 2014

The Dallas hospital communication lapse that led to the discharge of a Liberian man with Ebola symptoms is an example of the failure of American health care system to effectively share health information, even within single institutions. It is not possible to know whether a faster response would have saved Thomas Eric Duncan’s life or reduced risk to the community and health workers.

What is clear is that rapid sharing of information is one of the elements critical to halting the spread of Ebola. Had all members of the initial care team known of the patient’s recent arrival from an Ebola-stricken country and acted appropriately to quarantine Mr. Duncan, this would have limited the chance of exposing the public and enabled faster preventive protocols for treating personnel.

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Lessons from Ebola: The Infectious Disease Era, And The Need To Prepare, Will Never Be Over


October 28th, 2014

With the wall-to-wall news coverage of Ebola recently, it’s hard for many to distinguish fact from fiction and to really understand the risk the disease poses and how prepared we are to fight it.

Fighting infectious diseases requires constant vigilance. Along with Ebola, health officials around the globe are closely watching other emerging threats: MERS-CoV, pandemic flu strains, Marburg, Chikungunya and Enterovirus D68. The best defense to all of these threats is a good offense — detecting, treating and containing as quickly and effectively as possible.

And yet, we have consistently degraded our ability to respond to these new, emerging and re-emerging threats by underfunding and undercutting existing capabilities and expecting the country to ramp up overnight when new threats emerge.

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The Latest Health Wonk Review


October 24th, 2014

Louise Norris at Colorado Health Insurance Insider provides this week’s “falling leaves” edition of the Health Wonk Review. Jennifer’s insightful read includes a Health Affairs Blog post from J. Stephen Morrison on the U.S. Ebola response and the role of CDC head Thomas Friedan.

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Resources Don’t Solve Design Flaws


October 21st, 2014

The first three sessions of a conference I recently attended tackled some complex and important questions: How do we extend health insurance to people such as migrant and informal workers who don’t fit neatly into mainstream coverage programs? As we increase our investment in primary care, how do we assure that the performance of the primary care system is at the highest possible level? What types of evidence should we use as we make decisions in a dynamic health care system with limited opportunities for “gold standard” randomized controlled trials?

These are excellent questions, and they were perfect topics for a cutting-edge conference discussing the challenges facing the U.S. health care system.

But this conference was not about the U.S. health care system. These were opening “satellite” sessions at the Third Global Symposium on Health Systems Research held in Cape Town, South Africa.

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Thomas Frieden And The U.S. Ebola Response


October 20th, 2014

On Friday, October 17, the White House named Ron Klain the new Ebola czar. This move followed a storm of criticism in the media, on Capitol Hill, and elsewhere. The criticism focused on the multiple mistakes made by the U.S. agencies and Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas in the weeks since Thomas Eric Duncan, infected with Ebola, arrived in the United States on September 19. Duncan set off a disturbing train of events that included secondary infections of two nurses, Nina Pham and Amber Vinson, along with the lingering threat of additional infections.

That threat widened rapidly over the course of this past week. Dozens of health workers in Dallas remain under some form of quarantine or very close monitoring. Contact tracing revealed 300 persons who had possibly come in contact with Vinson during her Columbus Day weekend travel from Dallas to Cleveland and back. Schools were subsequently shuttered in Ohio and Texas.

Most remarkable, within a month the controversy surrounding the threat of Ebola to Americans had mushroomed into a political emergency for the Obama presidency itself, only a few tense weeks before the November 4 elections. Calls escalated for the appointment of an Ebola czar and a travel ban on persons originating in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, the root sources of the Ebola emergency. A special measure of criticism was reserved for the Obama administration’s lead face in the U.S. response, Dr. Thomas Frieden, head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In the words of one observer, this week became full of “recriminations, political showboating… and panicked overreactions.”

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500 Days And Counting: Critical Steps In The Countdown To Achieving MDG 6


October 6th, 2014

Editor’s note: For more on global health, see the September issue of Health Affairs.

We are now less than 500 days away from December 31, 2015, the target date for reaching the world’s Millennium Development Goals (MDG). This includes MDG 6, the goal of combatting HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases.

Astonishing progress has been made to date (as mentioned previously in our Health Affairs Blog post): AIDS-related deaths have fallen 35 percent since their peak in 2005; global mortality from tuberculosis has fallen by 45 percent since 1990; and global malaria mortality rates dropped 42 percent globally between 2000 and 2012. The key, of course, is maintaining this momentum in order to reach our goal.

It’s certainly no small task. But, three immediate steps can and must be taken:

  1. Enhance cost efficiencies;
  2. Build and strengthen partnerships; and
  3. Translate scientific developments into practice.
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Is A Study Of HIV Treatment For Mothers In Africa Unethical?


October 1st, 2014

A global health controversy erupted this summer when the prominent scientific journal Nature ran an article entitled “HIV trial attacked.” Within, commentators squared off over whether a huge ongoing study provides suboptimal and thus unethical treatment options to mothers with HIV in the developing world.

The multinational PROMISE study (for Promoting Maternal and Infant Survival Everywhere) is enrolling thousands of pregnant women with HIV in hopes of comparing mortality and other clinical outcomes between mothers who receive lifelong HIV therapy to mothers who receive shorter treatment durations if they have less advanced HIV disease.

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Exhibit Of The Month: Mental Health Spending On A Global Scale


September 29th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Month” series. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month’s exhibit, published in the September global health issue of Health Affairs, looks at budget allocation for mental health services by country income level.

In the article, “Policy Actions To Achieve Integrated Community-Based Mental Health Services,” authors Mary DeSilva, Chiara Samele, Shekhar Saxena, Vikram Patel, and Ara Darzi write that “most low-income countries allocate about 0.5 percent of their already small health budgets to the treatment and prevention of mental health problems.”

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Global Health Update: High Bed Occupancy Rates And Increased Mortality In Denmark


September 24th, 2014

High levels of bed occupancy are associated with increased inpatient and thirty-day hospital mortality in Denmark, according to research recently published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

Authors Flemming Madsen, Steen Ladelund, and Allan Linneberg received considerable media attention in Denmark for their research findings. For one major Television channel, it topped Germany’s victory in the World Cup finals.

In another story from the Danish newspaper, Information, Councillor Ulla Astman, Chairman of the North Denmark Regional Council and second highest ranking politician, who runs all of the Danish public hospitals, reportly stated that “we have to live with it [the increased mortality],” since they cannot afford to reduce bed occupancy.

“Or die with it,” said lead author Madsen, a pulmonary physician and director of the Allergy and Lung Clinic in Helsingør, Denmark, at the July 9 Health Affairs briefing, “Using Big Data To Transform Care.” Madsen, who left his position as director of the Department of Internal Medicine at Frederiksberg Hospital in Copenhagen to pursue this research, believes that Astman’s statement explains why they have a bed shortage problem and supports his argument that bed shortage is a result of planning.

“It is dangerous to focus on productivity without looking at the consequences,” says Madsen.

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Think and Act Globally: Health Affairs’ September Issue


September 8th, 2014

The September issue of Health Affairs emphasizes lessons learned from developing and industrialized nations collectively seeking the elusive goals of better care, with lower costs and higher quality. A number of studies analyze key global trends including patient engagement and integrated care, while others examine U.S.-based policy changes and their applicability overseas.

This issue was supported by the Qatar Foundation and World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH), Hamad Medical Corporation, Imperial College London, and The Commonwealth Fund.

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Health Affairs Event Reminder: Advancing Global Health Policy


September 5th, 2014

Please join us on Monday, September 8, when Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil will host a briefing to discuss our September 2014 thematic issue, “Advancing Global Health Policy.” In an expansion of last year’s theme, “The ‘Triple Aim’ Goes Global,” we explore how developing and industrialized countries around the world are confronting challenges and learning from each other on three aims: cost, quality, and population health.

A highlight of the event will be a discussion of international health policy—led by Weil—featuring former CMS and FDA administrator and current Brookings Institution Senior Fellow Mark McClellan and Lord Ara Darzi, surgeon, scholar, and former UK Health Minister. Additional panels will look at how countries are transforming chronic care, lowering costs, and redesigning delivery systems.

WHEN: 
Monday, September 8, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE: 
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC, 13th Floor

REGISTER NOW!

Follow Live Tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_GlobalHealth.

If you can’t come in person (we hope you will!), you can watch the webcast of the event.

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Partnership And Progress On The Path To Achieving Millennium Development Goal 6


August 25th, 2014

Editor’s note: For more on global health, stay tuned for the upcoming September issue of Health Affairs.

In 2000, nearly 200 world leaders came together and agreed on a set of objectives intended to tackle some of the most pressing development challenges of our time, such as poverty, AIDS, and child mortality. With a target date of December 31, 2015, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) provided a clear path for progress and a platform for immediate action. Last week, on August 18, we reached a milestone on that path –- as of that date, 500 days remained to achieve these eight goals. So where do we stand, and what more must be done?

Combatting HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Other Diseases

For those of us focused acutely on MDG number 6—combatting HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases—the recent Millennium Development Goals Report had encouraging news. An estimated 3.3 million deaths from malaria were averted between 2000 and 2012 due to the expansion of malaria interventions, and efforts to fight tuberculosis have saved an estimated 22 million lives since 1995.

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Health Affairs Briefing: Advancing Global Health Policy


August 22nd, 2014

Please join us on Monday, September 8, when Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil will host a briefing to discuss our September 2014 thematic issue, “Advancing Global Health Policy.”  In an expansion of last year’s theme, “The ‘Triple Aim’ Goes Global,” we explore how developing and industrialized countries around the world are confronting challenges and learning from each other on three aims: cost, quality, and population health.

A highlight of the event will be a discussion of international health policy—led by Weil—featuring former CMS and FDA administrator and current Brookings Institution Senior Fellow Mark McClellan and Lord Ara Darzi, surgeon, scholar, and former UK Health Minister. Additional panels will look at how countries are transforming chronic care, lowering costs, and redesigning delivery systems.

WHEN: 
Monday, September 8, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE: 
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC, 13th Floor

REGISTER NOW!

Follow Live Tweets from the briefing @HA_Events, and join in the conversation with #HA_GlobalHealth.

Read the rest of this entry »

Roll-Out Of New TB Drug Must Be Handled With Care


June 13th, 2014

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Johnson and Johnson, has announced that it will make its breakthrough new tuberculosis (TB) drug, Sirturo, available at a discount in 130 developing countries. As the first new antibiotic to be approved to treat TB in over 40 years, Sirturo will be an important new weapon in the aging arsenal of medicines used to treat this deadly disease.

Sirturo’s approval was a breakthrough for global health and TB treatment. In 2012, the airborne disease killed about 1.3 million people, making it second only to HIV/AIDS in the ranks of infectious killers. While the number of people dying from TB each year is slowly falling, drug-resistant strains are proliferating. According to the World Health Organization, ninety two countries have reported cases of extensively drug resistant TB since it was first reported in 2006.

Tuberculosis Treatment Programs

Now that Sirturo is ready for prime time – and poised for international distribution – it’s critical that the roll-out is meticulously managed by health care systems in each and every country that plans to administer it. TB drug resistance usually arises from poorly managed tuberculosis treatment programs. Treatment is long – about six months for basic treatment, and up to two years for drug-resistant strains – and only adds to the challenge of successful treatment completion. With improper or inadequate treatment, virulent new forms can evolve.

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Chinese Doctors In Crisis: Discontented And In Danger


May 27th, 2014

Chinese doctors are unhappy about their pay and work conditions.  Moreover, they are in danger of physical attack by angry patients and families.  The Ministry of Health estimated that in 2010, 17,243 attack and agitation incidents occurred in Chinese hospitals, an increase of almost 7,000 over five years. Patients, bereaved families of patients who have died in hospitals, and sometimes paid protestors called yinao or “medical troublemakers,” invade hospitals, berate or attack staff, create loud disruptions, and stage mock funerals.

About 30 percent of the attacks were carried out by patients, 60 percent by family members, and the remainder by others, including yinao. About 75 percent of attacks were aimed at doctors.  According to a 2012 survey of nearly 6,000 Chinese physicians in 3,300 hospitals, 59 percent of doctors had been verbally assaulted and 6 percent had been physically assaulted. News accounts for 2002-2011 yielded 124 incidents of “serious violence” against hospitals, including 29 murders and 52 serious injuries. Often violence accompanies demands for cash compensation for harm to patients, including patient deaths in hospitals.

In response, the Chinese Ministry of Public Security has recently announced a new set of security measures for hospitals. Approximately one thousand top-tier hospitals will now have a police presence in addition to their own security guards; alarm systems linked with local law enforcement; enhanced audio-visual surveillance systems; and security posts at entrances similar to those at airports.

The wave of violent attacks on doctors and other medical workers constitutes a significant problem in its own right.  But it is also a reflection of a broader set of problems faced by today’s generation of Chinese doctors.  They are badly paid, both in relation to doctors in other countries, and in relation to other Chinese professionals. As a result, doctors often supplement their low salaries in ways that strengthen the popular impression that they are corrupt, fostering still greater distrust and anger among their patients and patients’ families. A recent survey showed that 67 percent of the Chinese public does not trust doctors’ professional diagnoses and treatment.

The doctors themselves are also dissatisfied with the current state of affairs. A 2011 Chinese Medical Association survey of its members showed fewer than 20 percent of responding doctors to be satisfied with their medical practice environments, while 48 percent rated them “poor” or “very poor”. Doctors were particularly dissatisfied with their pay. They were also concerned about their work conditions.

When respondents were asked to identify sources of work pressure, the most frequent response, at 77 percent, was “high patient expectations.”  Only 21 percent wanted their own children to become doctors. Interestingly, this survey showed that fewer than 10 percent of respondents blamed patients, doctors, or hospitals for their problems; the majority (83 percent) blamed “the system” for the tension between doctors and patients.

In this post, we review that system and highlight sources of doctors’ discontent and the distrust between doctors and patients.

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Development Assistance For Global Health: Is The Funding Revolution Over?


April 17th, 2014

In many ways, the last twenty years have been somewhat of a “revolution” in global health, as marked by rising attention, growing funding, and the creation of new, large scale initiatives to address global health challenges in low and middle income countries.  Indeed, the 1990s brought a steady increase in global concern about health, largely centered on the HIV epidemic and due to civil society organizing to draw attention to the growing crisis, leading to the creation of the Millennium Development Goals, and soon thereafter, the GAVI Alliance, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund), and the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, and other efforts.

A key driver of increased funding has been donors – governments and multilateral agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and foundations.  And tracking their funding has become one of the critical measures of the global health response.

A new analysis from Dieleman et al., published as a Health Affairs Web First on April 8, provides a needed contribution to the literature on donor funding for health, including an understanding not just of where donor funding is going but of the relationship between aid, burden, and income.

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The Case For Global Health Diplomacy


April 14th, 2014

At the end of February, I had the pleasure of speaking about global health diplomacy at the Nursing Leadership in Global Health Symposium at Vanderbilt University. Nurses are one of the specialties that we support in the Frist Global Health Leaders program facilitated by Hope Through Healing Hands, a nonprofit dedicated to advancing peace by supporting health care services and education in some of the world’s most vulnerable communities. Nurses, including the men and women I met at Vanderbilt, have an enormous opportunity to affect health and global health diplomacy. Indeed, everyone in the medical profession can play a crucial role in health diplomacy.

Global Health Diplomacy And Foreign Policy

For several years now I’ve been thinking about—and speaking about—global health diplomacy. The term started appearing around 2000 and has many definitions, representing the complexity of the issue itself. Diplomacy, at the simplest level, is a tool used in negotiating foreign policy. Health diplomacy is different, though. As a physician, the overall goal of health is clear: improve quality of life by improving health and meeting overall patient goals of care. As a diplomat and policymaker, the goal is more complicated.

Foreign policy, in general, is a dance—a negotiation of shared goals and identification of conflicts between nations, always with inherent tension. For example, what we want for the government of Afghanistan may not align with their complex political and cultural ideologies.

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Health Affairs Web First: Global Health Funding In 2013 Five Times Greater Than 1990


April 8th, 2014

Development assistance for health (DAH) to low- and middle-income countries provided by donors and international agencies are given in the form of grants, low-cost loans, and goods and services. Without this assistance, some of the poorest countries would be less able to supply basic health care.

A new study, being released today as a Web First by Health Affairs, tracked the flow of development assistance for health and estimated that in 2013 it reached $31.3 billion.

Looking at past growth patterns of these international transfers of funds for health, authors Joseph Dieleman, Casey Graves, Tara Templin, Elizabeth Johnson, Ranju Baral, Katherine Leach-Kemon, Anne Haakenstad, and Christopher Murray identified a steady 6.5 percent annualized growth rate between 1990 and 2000, which nearly doubled to 11.3 percent between 2001 and 2010 with the burgeoning of many public-private partnerships. Since 2011, however, annualized growth has dramatically dropped, to 1.1 percent, due, in part, to the effect of the global economic crisis.

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Embarking On A New Journey With Health Affairs


March 31st, 2014

I am delighted to be taking on the role of editor-in-chief of Health Affairs. This is a dynamic time in all aspects of health and health care: insurance coverage expansions, delivery system changes, and growing attention to population health.  Building upon thirty-three years of peer-reviewed scholarship, Health Affairs will continue to serve as the nation’s primary resource for the health policy community.

My goals for Health Affairs coalesce around a single theme: broadening the reach of the journal.

Health Affairs is strong in the core health policy community, but our scholarship is relevant to myriad actors in the one-sixth of the United States economy represented by health care.  My goal is to broaden our engagement with the worlds of law, finance, design, and many others.

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