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The Hitachi Foundation Sheds Light on the New Role Frontline Workers Play in Health Care


April 24th, 2014
by Tom Strong

Care guides. Patient navigators. Community health workers. Everywhere, primary care providers are experimenting with new roles for care team members. It’s not hard to understand why. Developing a truly patient-centered, team-based approach means medical providers must experiment with how services are provided, and who delivers them. At the same time, there are many established players […]

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Adding Their Voices: What Older Adults Are Saying about Team Care and the Medical Home


April 14th, 2014
by Marcus Escobedo

Foundations, government, and the health care sector are making large investments to reengineer and revitalize primary care, hoping this will improve the cost and quality of health care overall. Primary care practices that use expanded teams to deliver well-coordinated care designed around the needs of patients and families—widely known as patient-centered medical homes—have become the […]

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Eliminating Preventable Harm in Academic Medical Centers: The Libretto Consortium and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation


March 18th, 2014
by Loren Pogir

Imagine a health care system where medical harms no longer occur. Where technology is connected and systems talk to each other. Where doctors, nurses, patients, and families work as a team, and decisions about health care are shared. Imagine a health care system that is so finely tuned that it can eliminate preventable harms, cut […]

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If You Partner, They Might Just Come: One Foundation’s Effort to Disseminate Data on Quality of Care


March 13th, 2014
by Andy Krackov

In an ever-crowded media and Internet landscape, where the average attention span is short (and sadly getting shorter every year), how do you get consumers to pay attention? That’s a dilemma every organization faces, from Nike or Jet Blue to Save the Children. In the past, many of us in the foundation world assumed that […]

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Elevating the Role of the Medical Assistant


March 3rd, 2014

The Pittsburgh-based Jewish Healthcare Foundation (JHF) and our Pittsburgh Regional Health Initiative (PRHI), an operating arm of the foundation, are transforming primary care—equipping practices with the resources necessary to reduce waste and inefficiency, improve workflows, implement and meaningfully use electronic health records, and treat complex patients with both physical and behavioral health conditions. True transformation […]

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New Orleans Health Department Transformation: the Role of Philanthropy in Supporting Change


February 26th, 2014
 
by Elizabeth Scheer and Jessica Riccardo

From the tragic flooding after Hurricane Katrina emerged an opportunity to transform the New Orleans Health Department (NOHD) and the local public health system. The health department transitioned from a marginal primary health care provider to a strategic public health leader facilitated by the dynamic leadership of Karen DeSalvo, health commissioner. This metamorphosis was catalyzed […]

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A World of Darkness: What If Thomas Edison Had to Write Grant Proposals to Invent the Light Bulb?


February 18th, 2014
by Jeffrey Brenner

Editors’ Notes:  This is the first in an occasional series of posts published in partnership with Grantmakers in Health (GIH). Visit its website for other updates about the field of health philanthropy. This post by Jeffrey Brenner is also available on the GIH website. As Thomas Edison began to write his grant report he cringed. Despite trying over 2,000 different materials […]

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California’s Low Income Health Program: A Public-Private Partnership That Worked


February 14th, 2014
 
by Richard Thomason and Peter Long

Amidst all of the criticism surrounding early implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), there was, in fact, a bright spot. As soon as the ACA was signed into law, California developed a landmark initiative known as the Low Income Health Program (LIHP). The program would go on to provide more than 660,000 low-income residents […]

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The Rippel Foundation and the RWJF Push Frontiers for Financing and Sustaining Improvements in Health


February 13th, 2014
by Laura Landy

When the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently announced that accountable care organizations (ACOs) saved Medicare nearly $400 million by more effectively coordinating care, I wondered where the money will go. How will we capture those savings and re-invest them to continue us on a path to better health and better care that is […]

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Upcycling: Bringing New Life to Existing Health Data


January 24th, 2014
by Stephanie Teleki

By now, most of us are familiar with recycling. Items with reclaimable value are collected; then base materials are salvaged to create new products—often of lesser quality. Fewer people are familiar with the term upcycling, a form of recycling that involves reconceiving, and sometimes adding to, existing items with the goal of giving them a […]

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Foundations Supporting Stewardship of Health Care Resources Through Medical Education and Training


January 22nd, 2014
 
by Daniel Wolfson and Leslie Tucker

With rising health care costs, the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, and increasing concern about the effects of unnecessary medical care, there has been more interest in the role of physicians in stewardship of health care resources. However, a major barrier to engaging physicians as stewards of resources is the lack of education and […]

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GrantWatch Blog Most-Read List for 2013: Post on the Role of Government in Supporting Healthy Eating Habits Leads The Way


January 11th, 2014
by Lee-Lee Prina

Happy New Year! We compiled a list of the ten most-read posts during 2013, in case you missed any of them. Interestingly, the most-read post during 2013 was an “oldie-but-goodie” from August 2012 about a debate held at that year’s Colorado Health Symposium, sponsored by the Colorado Health Foundation. GrantWatch Blog invited the foundation’s then-vice president of […]

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New in the Journal: Emergency Care: What Have Foundations Recently Supported?


December 5th, 2013
by Lee-Lee Prina

The theme of the December issue of Health Affairs is “The Future of Emergency Medicine: Challenges and Opportunities.” Among the issue’s several funders is the Pittsburgh-based Jewish Healthcare Foundation. Our GrantWatch section on health philanthropy goes along with the issue’s theme by providing a selected sampling of what foundations have been supporting in the area […]

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Communication about Health Care with Low-Income Californians: Results from a New Survey


November 1st, 2013
by Jessica Bylander

Low-income patients are often the most difficult to reach, given access issues, language barriers, and lack of resources. But despite the challenges, these patients are willing and eager to engage more with their providers and avail themselves of new health care delivery models and technologies to do so, according to new research released October 23. […]

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The Commonwealth Fund Has Announced A New Direction: Seeks to Expand Reach While Maintaining Influence


October 23rd, 2013
by Amir Al-Kourainy

The Commonwealth Fund recently announced a refocusing of its policy priorities. The new direction comes on the heels of David Blumenthal joining the Commonwealth Fund as the seventh president of the ninety-five-year old philanthropy. Since its founding by Anna Harkness in 1918, the foundation has had a mission to “do something for the welfare of […]

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The Commonwealth Fund’s WhyNotTheBest.org: Building a Platform for Health System Improvement


October 9th, 2013
 
by Anne-Marie Audet and Martha Hostetter

Development of The Commonwealth Fund’s WhyNotTheBest.org—a free tool with which to benchmark hospital performance on measures of quality and safety, outcomes, and costs—began with a question. We asked: if the U.S. health care system is not the “best in the world,” as has been amply demonstrated, what will it take to get us there?  Late […]

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NIHCM Foundation Funding Available for Research on How to Improve US Health Care System


June 13th, 2013
by Lee-Lee Prina

The National Institute for Health Care Management (NIHCM) Foundation, located in Washington, D.C., is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to improving the effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of America’s health care system, according to its website. Studies chosen for this funding must have strong potential to yield insights that will help improve the US health care […]

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Controlling Costs and Improving the Quality of US Health Care: The Bipartisan Policy Center’s Report


June 6th, 2013
by Divvy Upadhyay

On April 19, 2013, the Washington, DC–based Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) released a comprehensive report with several recommendations for reducing the cost and improving the quality of health care in the United States. Funded by the Peter G Peterson Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the report was part of the BPC’s Health Care Cost Containment Initiative, which was led by four government veterans: former Senate majority leaders, Tom Daschle and Bill Frist; former chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, Pete Domenici; and former White House Office of Management and Budget director and first director of the Congressional Budget Office, Dr. Alice Rivlin. The report was coauthored and reviewed by BPC Health Project directors, Katherine Hayes and William Hoagland, along with other staff and seasoned health policy experts, such as Paul B. Ginsburg, Chris Jennings, Sheila Burke, Steven Lieberman, and Joe Minarik.

What makes this initiative unique, the authors say, is its bipartisan approach and a focus that extends beyond just “federal health-costs and deficit reduction.” In a Washington Post op-ed, Daschle, Frist, Domenici, and Rivlin point to the report’s more than fifty major policy recommendations and an estimated $560 billion in debt and deficit reduction over the next decade. That savings, they say, “is the outgrowth of our work, not the goal.” The chief lesson is: “Until better care is prioritized over more care, our nation will continue to face a problem with health-care costs.” They admit there is no silver bullet and “[n]o single set of recommendations can fix the health-care system or the nation’s debt and deficit crisis overnight,” but they hope “this report can start a constructive, pragmatic dialogue among policymakers and political leaders”.

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Foundation Blogs Round-Up: Medicare, Environmental Health, Patient-Centered Care, and More


May 15th, 2013
by Lee-Lee Prina

Here are some recent foundation blog posts that caught my eye. The subjects are varied, so there is something for everybody to read! Environmental Health; Disaster Planning On April 29 Lauren Linville, a communications associate with the Health and Environmental Funders Network (HEFN), wrote on its Giving Insight blog about lessons learned during Hurricane Sandy. In “Six […]

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New in the Journal: Patient Engagement, Patient Safety, and Quality of Care: What Foundations Are Funding


February 7th, 2013
by Lee-Lee Prina

My GrantWatch column in the newly released February 2013 issue of Health Affairs focuses on what foundations around the country have been funding in these areas. Of course, the column includes only a sampling of foundation-funded activities. The column is free access to all. Health philanthropy has been exploring patient engagement in its grant making […]

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