Blog Home

Archive for the 'Health Care Costs' Category




Grand-Aides And Health Policy: Reducing Readmissions Cost-Effectively


October 29th, 2014

Hospital readmissions for the same condition within 30 days likely should not occur, and most often indicate system failure. Readmitted patients are either discharged too early, should be placed into palliative care or hospice, or most often are victims of a failure in transition of care from hospital to home. Most hospitals and physicians would like to eliminate such readmissions, particularly now that payers like Medicare are penalizing hospitals for high rates of readmission. Numerous approaches have been tried to reduce readmissions, with recent published improvements between a 2 percent and 26 percent reduction.

The Grand-Aides® program features rigorous training of nurse aides or community health workers to work as nurse extenders, 5 Grand-Aides to one RN or NP supervisor, with approximately 50 patients per Grand-Aide per year. The Grand-Aides visit at home daily for the first 5 days post-discharge and then as ordered by the supervisor (e.g. 3 days the next week) for at least 30 days, extending as long as desired.

Read the rest of this entry »

Adult Conversation On High-Priced Drugs? Don’t Hold Your Breath (But Hang In There) …


October 27th, 2014

The benevolent identity of the health care enterprise tends to moderate disagreements and keep them under a big tent of shared goals. In the case of very high prices for powerful new drugs, however, the commons gets stretched painfully thin. Drug companies which see themselves as pioneers are accused of being merely greedy. Cost-conscious payers and regulators are impugned for depriving patients of life-conserving treatment breakthroughs. A divisive political undercurrent often threatens to obtrude. Altogether, a tough environment for rational policy assessment.

Credit is due, accordingly, to the Brookings Institution, for putting a wide array of views on display at its October 1 forum on “the cost and value of biomedical innovation,” which was jointly sponsored by the Schaeffer Center at the University of Southern California. With the head of Gilead Sciences at one pole of the discussion and a leading generics industry attorney at the other, the discussion didn’t lack for strongly-held views, strongly stated.

But the tone was civil, a lot of useful information was exchanged, and the audience went away carrying a meta-message about the importance of maintaining an “adult conversation” on a subject of such obvious importance and difficulty.

Read the rest of this entry »

Will Employers Favor Private Exchanges Over Coverage Sponsorship?


October 17th, 2014

Over the past couple years, health care exchanges probably have consumed more of corporate benefits managers’ time and psychic energy than any other topic. An outstanding question is whether the rank and file of American businesses will drop the hassle that employer-sponsored coverage represents, or default to private exchanges.

Private exchange offerings typically move employees from their companies’ previous self-funded health plans to fully-insured individual arrangements, purporting to offer more flexibility and choice that can adapt to the wide-ranging needs of employees and employers, while creating a more competitive health plan marketplace.

Several recent surveys have reported that employers plan to move aggressively to private exchanges. In a survey last year of more than 700 businesses, the Private Exchange Evaluation Collaborative, a group of regional business health coalitions working with the consulting group PwC, found that 45 percent of employers have implemented or are considering using a private exchange for active employees before 2018. Similarly, a February Aon Plc survey found that, while 95 percent of employers say they expect to continue offering health care for the next 3-5 years, and 5 percent of employers currently use a private exchange, 33 percent say they may consider using one in the future.

Read the rest of this entry »

Teaching Health Centers: An Attainable, Near-Term Pathway To Expand Graduate Medical Education


October 17th, 2014

Stakeholders in Graduate Medical Education (GME) and members of Congress eagerly anticipated the long delayed but recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) GME report. While perceptively characterizing the defects in our GME system, recommendations of the report generated substantial controversy among participants at a recent GME forum hosted by Health Affairs. The IOM proposed limited and gradual changes in Medicare GME financing, but the lack of support for GME expansion was not well received by some.

At present there are multiple legislative GME proposals, but none has gained broad support among the various stakeholders. Congressional committees responsible for GME funding view this lack of consensus among GME stakeholders as a major obstacle.

We describe a near-term and attainable pathway to expand GME that could gain consensus among these stakeholders. This approach would sustain and expand Teaching Health Centers (THCs), a recent initiative that directly funds community-based GME sponsoring institutions to train residents in primary care specialties, dentistry and psychiatry. We further propose selectively expanding GME to meet primary care and other demonstrable specialty needs within communities, and building in evaluations to measure effectiveness of innovative training models.

Read the rest of this entry »

Slow Health Care Spending Growth Moderates GDP Growth In The Short Term And Policy Targets Should Reflect This


October 16th, 2014

Economic growth is most often measured by growth in gross domestic product (GDP), which is the value of all final goods and services produced in an economy. Recent revisions to the first quarter 2014 estimates of U.S. GDP growth have raised concerns over the extent to which the Affordable Care Act (ACA) might be impacting economic growth.

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) first estimated GDP growth for the first quarter of 2014 to be 0.1 percent on an annualized basis. Then a revised second estimate was made, which indicated a decline in GDP of 1.0 percent on an annualized basis. Finally, on June 25 a second and final revised estimate of a 2.9 percent decrease on an annualized basis was released.

While revisions to initial estimates of GDP growth are not uncommon, one aspect of this second revision was, indeed, uncommon. Nearly two-thirds of the second downward revision (1.2 of the 1.9 percent) was attributed to health care spending being substantially lower in the first quarter of 2014 than was originally forecasted by the BEA.

Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Reference Pricing And Network Adequacy


October 12th, 2014

On October 10, 2014, the Departments of Labor, Treasury, and Health and Human Services issued a frequently asked question (FAQ) regarding the use of reference-based pricing in non-grandfathered large group employer plans.  Although the issue the FAQ addresses specifically is the use of reference pricing, the FAQ is remarkable insofar as it is the first departmental guidance that I am aware of that addresses the use of networks by self-insured ERISA plans.

Network adequacy is an issue that has long been addressed in the nongroup and insured group market in many states by state insurance law.  The ACA also requires qualified health plans, and arguably any individual and small group plan subject to the essential health benefits requirements, to have adequate provider networks.  Special rules implementing ACA section 2719A of the ACA limit cost-sharing for out-of-network coverage for emergency services.

The departments also stated in an earlier FAQ that cost sharing cannot be applied by any non-grandfathered health plan for preventive services provided by out-of-network providers if the services are not available in network.   But I am unaware of the departments otherwise attempting previously to regulate group health plan network requirements, at least under the ACA.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Need For A Comprehensive, Current, And Market-Representative Health Care Cost Benchmark


October 7th, 2014

A recent post from Jonathan Skinner and colleagues on Health Affairs Blog posited an interesting solution to ever-increasing health care costs, suggesting that imposing price caps on all medical services, equal to 125 percent of the Medicare payment, would serve to eliminate wide variations in quoted prices for health care services.

While the overall idea of controlling costs through the establishment of a mutually agreed-upon and accessible benchmark is a sound one, the use of Medicare reimbursement levels as a ceiling for this purpose would present a number of challenges. For example, Medicare does not assign a value to all codes; a separate system would be needed to price services not addressed by Medicare’s fee schedule.

Also, Medicare’s reimbursement levels can be influenced by governmental imperatives and therefore may not be truly representative of market costs. And the establishment of a 125 percent of Medicare cap—a standard used by some health plans for in-network care where providers are guaranteed a high volume of patients—might not be adequate reimbursement for one-off, out-of-network services that lack a network’s compensatory volume economics.

We at FAIR Health suggest an alternative approach using measures that are acceptable to all stakeholders as reference points for out-of network charges to help achieve the proposal’s laudable goal: to provide quality health care at transparent prices that are reasonable for consumers and fair to providers.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs October Issue: Specialty Drugs — Cost, Impact, And Value


October 6th, 2014

The October issue of Health Affairs, released today, includes a number of studies looking at the high costs associated with today’s increasingly prevalent specialty drugs. Other subjects covered in the issue: an assessment of whether some hospitals may be taking advantage of the 340B drug discount program; a review of how shortened residency shifts impact patient care; a study on the increasing costs associated with Hepatitis C and advanced liver disease; and more.

The new issue will be discussed at a Washington DC briefing tomorrow. This issue of Health Affairs was supported by CVS Health.

Do specialty drugs offer value that offsets their high costs?

James Chambers of Tufts Medical Center and coauthors conducted a cost-value review of specialty versus traditional drugs by analyzing incremental health gains associated with each. This first-of-its-kind analysis is timely because the majority of drugs now approved by the Food and Drug Administration are specialty drugs produced using advanced biotechnology and requiring special administration, monitoring, and handling — all of which result in higher costs.

Read the rest of this entry »

Reminder: Health Affairs Briefing: Specialty Pharmaceuticals


October 3rd, 2014

We live in an era of specialty pharmaceuticals — drugs typically used to treat chronic, serious or life threatening conditions such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, growth hormone deficiency, and multiple sclerosis.  Their cost is often much higher than traditional drugs, and they are set to account for more than half of all drug spending by the end of this decade.

The October 2014 edition of Health Affairs, “Specialty Pharmaceutical Spending and Policy,” contains a cluster of articles examining the host of issues related to specialty pharmaceuticals: from the promise they hold for curing or managing chronic diseases, to the risk they pose for exacerbating health care costs and disparities, and the challenges they present for policymakers striving to balance both.

Please join us on Tuesday, October 7, for a briefing on the October issue moderated by Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil.

WHEN: 
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

WHERE: 
Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC, Lower Level

REGISTER NOW!

Follow Live Tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_SpecialtyDrugs.

Health Affairs is grateful to CVS Health for its financial support of the issue and event.

Read the rest of this entry »

Establishing Vouchers For Veteran Health Care


October 2nd, 2014

Editor’s note: For more on this topic, stay tuned for additional Health Affairs Blog posts today from Jonathan Bush and Joel Kupersmith. 

Recent disclosures of long wait times at Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities that are presumed to lead to adverse patient outcomes have led to calls for reorganization. Possible reorganization approaches include privatization and the provision of vouchers to enrolled veterans. However, this discussion must recognize that Medicare already provides comprehensive services to the majority of VA patients.

Provider care coordination accompanied by financial incentives such as subsidized co-pays and deductibles, or purchased MEDIGAP policies, could induce veterans who use relatively little VA care to choose most, if not all, of their health care from Medicare providers. This would affect budget allocations under current VA funding and the new funding under the PL 113-146 (Veterans’ Access to Care through Choice, Accountability, and Transparency Act of 2014), potentially freeing up VA resources to deal with increasingly complex patients, without creating another bureaucracy or insurance program. Combined with VA management reforms which should include provider productivity requirements and more intense quality reviews, financial incentives to focus VA care have the potential to help VA return to performing its core mission successfully.

Read the rest of this entry »

An Interview With George Halvorson: The Kaiser Permanente Renaissance, And Health Reform’s Unfinished Business


September 30th, 2014

For decades, health policymakers considered Kaiser Permanente the lode star of delivery system reform.  Yet by the end of 1999, the nation’s oldest and largest group model HMO had experienced almost three years of significant operating losses, the first in the plan’s history. It was struggling to implement a functional electronic health record, and had a reputation for inconsistent customer service.  But most seriously, it faced deep divisions between management and the leadership of its powerful Permanente Federation, which represents Kaiser’s more than 17,000 physicians, over both strategic direction and operations of the plan.

Against this backdrop, Kaiser surprised the health plan community by announcing in March 2002 the selection of a non-physician, George Halvorson, as its new CEO.  Halvorson had spent most of his career in the Twin Cities, most recently as CEO of HealthPartners, a successful mixed model health plan.  Halvorson’s reputation was as a product innovator; he not only developed a prototype of the consumer-directed health plan in the mid-1990’s, but also population health improvement objectives for its membership, both firsts in the industry.

During his twelve year tenure as CEO, Halvorson not only guided the plan to solid profitability, but added a million members in California, its largest market, despite a devastating recession and a national retreat of commercial HMO membership.  He invested over $6 billion in computerized patient care systems and population health management infrastructure, healed the breach with Kaiser’s physicians, and markedly increased its consumer satisfaction scores, earning 5 STAR ratings under Medicare Advantage.  He left the organization at the end of 2013 with more than $53 billion in revenues and more than $19 billion in reserves and investments.

This interview covers Halvorson’s time at Kaiser, his views of health reform, including the unfinished reform agenda, and his public health activism.  It was conducted by Jeff Goldsmith, a veteran health industry analyst, and Associate Professor of Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia.  Jeff is a member of the editorial board of Health Affairs.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Payment Reform Landscape: Value-Oriented Payment Jumps, And Yet …


September 30th, 2014

Today, Catalyst for Payment Reform (CPR) unveiled some potentially exciting news: Our 2014 National Scorecard on Payment Reform tells us 40 percent of commercial sector payments to doctors and hospitals now flow through value-oriented payment methods, defined as payment methods designed to improve quality and reduce waste.  This is a dramatic increase since 2013 when the figure was just 11 percent.

Traditional fee-for-service, where we pay for every test and procedure regardless of its value, may rapidly be becoming a relic.  While the Scorecard findings are not wholly representative of health plans across the United States, they are directionally sound and allow us to measure progress toward value-oriented payment in the commercial sector.  (Scorecard findings are based on data representing almost 65 percent of commercial health plans across the country.)

On the face of it, this is thrilling news for CPR, especially since our organizational goal is that at least 20 percent of payments to doctors and hospitals will flow through methods proven to improve value by the year 2020.  But we are not closing up shop just yet.  The proliferation of value-based payment arrangements only matters if they succeed at reducing costs and improving the quality of care. And for many value-oriented payment models, we still don’t have the evidence.

We also remain a bit circumspect because only about half of the value-oriented payments (out of that 40 percent figure) put providers at some financial risk if they fail to improve care or spend over budget.  To employers and others helping to foot the bill for health care, many new payment methods often feel like “cost plus arrangements.”  Instead, purchasers would like to see risk sharing across payers and providers.

Read the rest of this entry »

IOM Report Calls For Transformation Of Care For The Seriously Ill


September 24th, 2014

The new Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on care near the end of life in the United States was released last week. I had the privilege of serving on the Committee for the last two years, involved both in the writing of the report itself and in coming to consensus on its recommendations.

The name of the report and the charge to the Committee from the IOM was focused on “end of life.” However, the title, “Dying in America,” is something of a misnomer. The report itself focuses extensively on people with serious and chronic illness with indeterminate prognoses, why the current health care system fails so consistently to meet their needs, and what must change to improve the situation.

Hospice is the gold standard of care quality for those that are predictably dying and clearly at the end of life, and we are fortunate as a nation to have such a strong (mostly home) hospice infrastructure, but that’s not where most of the problems lie. The problems lie in the lack of options for people who are either not hospice-eligible (prognosis uncertain or continuing to want and benefit from disease treatment) or are referred to hospice much too late in their disease course to influence their experience and their families’.

The new report builds on the 1998 IOM report “Approaching Death” and goes well beyond the usual nostrums of calling for reimbursement for advance care planning and decrying all the “waste” in health care spending during the last year of life.

Read the rest of this entry »

Reconceptualizing Health and Health Care: Why Our Cancer Care Delivery System Is In Crisis


September 23rd, 2014

Cancer Care System in Crisis

Americans fear cancer. In a poll for MetLife, when participants were asked which major disease they feared most, 41 percent said cancer, 31 percent said Alzheimer’s disease, and small percentages of other respondents said other diseases. Not surprisingly, The National Institutes of Health has a budget allocation of $4.9 billion for 2014 to The National Cancer Institute, far more than any other Institute and over 25 percent of the NIH’s total funding to study organ-based diseases ($19.2 billion).

Despite this longstanding commitment to cancer research, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) reported in September 2013 that America’s cancer care delivery system is “in crisis.” The IOM determined that physicians ask for patients’ preferences in medical decisions only 50 percent of the time and that 25 percent of patients report that their clinicians fail to share important information, such as test results or medical history, with other care providers.

Of bankruptcies in the U.S., 33 percent are related to medical concerns, and many people are referring to the astounding cost of cancer therapies as another “toxicity” of the disease. Patients are too often prescribed cancer treatments that can cost double the conventional treatment options but have no evidence-based incremental benefits.

Read the rest of this entry »

Bundled Payments: Do They Put Innovation At Risk?


September 22nd, 2014

While the United States health care system is quickly shifting focus from volume to value, bundled payments have emerged as a promising lever for containing costs and improving quality of care. This model, designed to offset some of the downfalls of traditional fee-for-service payments, reimburses providers based on a predetermined cost of an episode, or group of related services.

The model calls for providers to take on some financial risk while meeting quality standards, especially in areas of well-defined procedures like hip and knee replacements. Now, many are beginning to experiment in other high-cost medical areas, such as behavioral health and oncology.

But what is the impact of bundled payments on medical advancement and innovation? Bundled payments are here to stay, but there remains serious apprehension among innovators adjusting to this evolving landscape. NEHI (Network for Excellence in Health Innovation) brought stakeholders together this July to create a conversation in which experts discussed how bundled payments already have, and will, impact patients’ access to innovation.

Read the rest of this entry »

Relative Value Health Insurance And Pay For Performance For Insurers: Complements, Not Substitutes


September 19th, 2014

Background

The quest for value dominates contemporary health policy.  Value, properly defined, is not about cost-savings but about the balance of costs and health benefits — improving the average cost-effectiveness of health interventions.  In choosing which care is funded, insurers are a crucial but commonly neglected driver of health system value.

Insurers can increase health system value by covering fewer cost-ineffective interventions or covering more cost-effective interventions.  Perhaps the earliest attempt to reform insurance, managed care, attempted to pursue both goals, but by the time it was implemented it widely focused (or was perceived to focus) on cost-containment.

A recent insurance reform proposal, known as Relative Value Health Insurance (RVHI), received considerable attention, for instance, in The Upshot, The Incidental Economist, and Forbes.  RVHI enables insurers to reduce their contractual obligation to cover “usual and customary” care.  This and similar earlier proposals rely on the insurers’ natural incentive to cut costs.  Less well-covered, however, are proposals to alter the very incentives of insurers to improve health, which we will call “pay-for-performance-for-insurers” (P4P4I).

Read the rest of this entry »

Pediatric Asthma: An Opportunity In Payment Reform And Public Health


September 18th, 2014

Editor’s note: The post is informed by a case study, the third in a series made possible through the Merkin Initiative on Physician Payment Reform and Clinical Leadership, a special project to develop clinician leadership in health care delivery and financing reform. The case study will be presented on Wednesday, September 24 using a “MEDTalk” format featuring live story-telling and knowledge-sharing from patients, providers, and policymakers. 

The Clinical Challenge: A Chronic, but Manageable Illness

Asthma affects 7 million children – more than 10 percent of kids in the U.S. – and is the most common chronic childhood disease. Yet even with high levels of insurance coverage, 46 percent of pediatric patients have uncontrolled asthma. There are substantial gaps in appropriate prescribing and adherence to effective medications. In addition, a multitude of non-medical issues influence a child’s ability to control their asthma: low parental health literacy, poor quality housing, and environmental triggers such as pests, mold, and cleaning chemicals. As a result 800,000 kids visit the emergency department (ED) for asthma each year.

In 2007 (the latest year which data are available) the U.S. spent over $56 billion on asthma care, of which nearly $27 billion was spent on pediatric asthma. Medicaid is the primary payer for pediatric asthma related hospitalizations with 55 percent of the market. Better control may also mean lower medical costs, due to reductions in ED visits, admissions, and other health care utilization – patients with poorly controlled severe asthma cost nearly $5,000 more per patient per year compared to average pediatric asthmatic costs.

Read the rest of this entry »

Reference Pricing And Network Adequacy Standards: Conflict Or Concord?


September 18th, 2014

With benefit designs and enrollee cost-sharing increasingly standardized across health plans under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), one of the remaining levers plans have to differentiate themselves—and to control premiums—is the size of their provider networks. Regulators have been caught in a crossfire between advocates of narrow networks who say they promote quality and keep prices down, and those who feel narrow networks could constrain access to necessary services.

Unfortunately, recent federal guidance – addressing, among other related items, the issue of “reference pricing” — blurs the distinction between in-network and out-of-network providers and may make it more difficult for regulators and consumers to understand the effective “size” of a particular network.

This confusion could undermine the goal of improving transparency in consumers’ health care choices and make it difficult for consumers to use prices in choosing providers. More troubling, expanded use of “reference pricing” under the guidance could leave patients paying unexpectedly large out-of-pocket amounts for services provided by ostensibly in-network providers.

Below, we characterize reference pricing as a “sub-network” contracting strategy, and we describe some of the implications of reference pricing and the guidance for consumers, regulators, plans, and providers.

Read the rest of this entry »

Reading Piketty In DC: Does Income Inequality Squeeze Health Spending?


September 16th, 2014

In the past year, an element of mystery and suspense has crept quietly into the long-running saga of health care spending growth, in most times a dreary tale of predictability and frustration.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO)’s August forecast of significant reductions in Medicare spending growth in the next decade will help stoke a running debate about whether the spending slowdown that has outlasted the 2008-2010 recession is merely a delayed effect of the slump or a symptom of structural changes with a life of their own.

The mystery and suspense come from month-to-month uncertainties and inscrutable data about which way the trend lines are bending, and why.

Health Spending and Employment

A useful slant on the puzzle is offered in an August Health Affairs analysis by Dave Dranove and colleagues that examines small area variations in spending growth and correlates them with employment data. Dranove et al. found that relatively higher health spending occurred where employment levels were relatively high, and high unemployment translated into less spending on health. So whether it’s copays, deductibles, insurance contributions, or some other cost associated with obtaining care, personal income is a factor in spending levels, just as health costs are a factor in personal income.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


September 12th, 2014

At Health Business Blog, David Williams is not ashamed to be a wonk in his September 11 edition of the Health Wonk Review. David highlights many great posts, including “The 125 Percent Solution,” suggested by Jonathan Skinner, Elliott Fisher, and James Weinstein on Health Affairs Blog, which would give consumers and insurers the option of paying 125 percent of the Medicare price for any health care service.

Read the rest of this entry »

Click here to email us a new post.