Blog Home

Archive for the 'Insurance' Category




State-Based Marketplaces: Leveraging Year-One Lessons To Boost Year-Two Enrollment


August 27th, 2014

In three months, consumers will log onto their state’s health insurance marketplace to investigate their options and enroll in a plan. Already, states are hard at work prepping for the second year of open enrollment, which begins November 15. State marketplaces are expected to increase the number of enrollees this year and adopting lessons from 2013-2014 can help.

A User-Friendly Marketplace

First and foremost, states need a user-friendly marketplace that functions properly and allows consumers, brokers, insurers and navigators to seek and provide information that is timely and credible. States know this, but recently, interviews with 100 staff from five successful state-based marketplaces (SBMs) unearthed several less obvious lessons.

To begin, states should move from last year’s ‘shotgun’ marketing that helped build awareness to a more targeted approach to outreach this year. In addition to some mass marketing to maintain awareness, states should target advertising dollars to high-priority segments and focus on less expensive tools, like direct mailing campaigns and walk-up enrollment centers, which proved to be most effective last year.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Evolution Of A Two-Tier Health Insurance Exchange System


August 13th, 2014

Note: In addition to Rosemarie Day, this post is also coauthored by Pamela Nadash and Angelique Hrycko.

Health reform has been a catalyst for change. It has fostered the creation of public health insurance exchanges and accelerated existing trends in health insurance coverage for employees. Many employers are reevaluating their coverage offerings, some employers are no longer providing insurance coverage, and, among those who continue to offer it, high deductible plans with restricted networks are becoming the norm.

In addition, employers are increasingly outsourcing health insurance benefits management by moving employees to private health insurance exchanges – often in combination with a shift toward a defined contribution approach. Estimates vary, but surveys show that anywhere from 9 to 45 percent of employers plan to implement private exchanges in the future.

Accenture (figure 1) has predicted that by 2018, private exchange enrollment will outpace public exchange enrollment.

Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Medicare And The ACA Marketplaces (Updated)


August 12th, 2014

On August 1, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released a set of frequently asked questions on the relationship between Medicare and the marketplaces. This is not the first guidance CMS has published on this topic, and much of the information in the FAQ was already available. The FAQ is also quite repetitive, as it answers the same questions under different headings, such as “general enrollment FAQs” and “consumer messaging,” but does contain useful information. This post briefly summarizes the FAQ.

The FAQ emphasizes the fact that Medicare and marketplaces operate independently, with little overlap. The marketplaces do not enroll individuals in Medicare or in Medicare Advantage plans and do not sell Medicare supplement plans. Indeed, exchanges cannot legally sell coverage to Medicare beneficiaries.

Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Transferring Information Among The Exchanges, The IRS, And Taxpayers


August 8th, 2014

For better or worse, Congress decided to use our tax system and the Internal Revenue Service to operationalize two of the most important features of the Affordable Care Act (ACA): the premium tax credits that make coverage affordable to many lower and moderate-income Americans and the individual responsibility provision which ensures that healthy as well as unhealthy Americans obtain health coverage.

The tax credits are available to otherwise uninsured Americans with incomes between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level. For 2014, tax credits are being received by 85 percent of marketplace enrollees and are reducing their premiums in the federally-facilitated exchanges by 76 percent.

The individual mandate is enforced through a tax that will be imposed on Americans who do have minimum essential coverage—such as employment-based coverage, individual coverage, or coverage through a government program—and who do not qualify for an exemption. For 2014, these individuals will owe a tax for each month that they lack minimum essential coverage of 1/12th of $95 per adult and $47.50 per child (up to $285 for a year) or 1 percent of their income above the tax filing limit up to the average annual cost of bronze plan ($2,448 per individual up to $12,240 for families of five or more).

In a recent post on Health Affairs Blog, Jon Kingsdale and Julia Lerche offered an excellent analysis of some of the difficulties that may be encountered during the 2014 tax filing season. In another post I described briefly recently released 2014 tax forms, as well as further guidance on tax matters. This post examines how tax reporting and filing will be handled in greater detail.

Read the rest of this entry »

Having A Baby: Media Confusion Over Charges, Costs, And The Benefits Of Insurance


August 6th, 2014

Note: In addition to Marc Berk, Claudia Schur also coauthored this post. 

Recent discussion about the Affordable Care Act has intensified the media’s interest in the cost of medical care. While as health services researchers we are perhaps in the best position to provide information on complex health care topics, we may need to improve our ability to distill information into one minute sound bites.

A particularly interesting example of the disconnect between media reporting and a more nuanced analysis occurred earlier this year, on March 4, when NBC ran a story about the cost of having a baby. The story confused the very different concepts of what health care providers charge, what they are actually paid, and what consumers owe, and in so doing obscured one of the key benefits for consumers of being insured.

We were startled to hear that, according to NBC, the cost of having a baby has increased more than 300 percent in the past 10 years. According to the report, the cost of a vaginal delivery went from $7,700 to $32,000, while the cost of a cesarean birth went from $11,000 to $51,000. A small heading in the table presented by NBC cited Truven Analytics as the source of these data.

Read the rest of this entry »

Decoding 2015 Health Insurance Rate Increase Requests


August 4th, 2014

Note: In addition to Christopher Koller, Sabrina Corlette coauthored this post.

The rates are coming, the rates are coming.

While there seem to be fewer “latest verdicts on the ACA,” breathlessly reported in the popular press, as we move through the second half of 2014, the filing of 2015 rate requests for individual and small group products on the health insurance exchanges offer one more piece of catnip for pundits.

Who is up? Who is down? How much? Is this the dreaded death spiral for the ACA? Or its vindication?

As discussions and analysis of these increases are disseminated, it is important to remember the following points

Read the rest of this entry »

An Ounce Of Prevention For The ACA’s Second Open Enrollment


August 4th, 2014

Note: In addition to Jon Kingsdale, this post is coauthored by Julia Lerche.

Since recovering from its flawed rollout, the ACA has enjoyed a string of successes. By April, some eight million Americans managed to enroll; for 2015, some reluctant insurers, including the nation’s second largest (United), are jumping into the new ACA Marketplaces; and the New England Journal of Medicine recently published an analysis confirming the ACA’s significant reduction of the uninsured.

Approximately 87 percent of Marketplace enrollees claimed premium tax credits, of which an estimated 85 percent, or six million, actually paid premiums. (We assume a disenrollment rate of 3 percent per month since April 2014, which is conservative compared with the Massachusetts Health Connector’s experience and in line with the assumptions of several State-based Marketplaces.) Many of the original six million, plus more recent enrollees, will experience their second enrollment between November 15, 2014 and February 15, 2015. They will also file with the IRS for a premium tax credit as early as January 2015.

The two events in combination represent a huge risk. We hope the responsible agencies will act soon to mitigate the risks.

Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: King Plaintiffs Ask For Supreme Court Review


August 1st, 2014

On July 31, 2014, Michael Carvin, attorney for the plaintiffs in King v. Burwell, one of two parallel cases challenging an IRS rule allowing premium tax credits to be issued by federally facilitated exchange, filed a petition for a writ of certioriari in the United States Supreme Court. The petition asks the Court to review the Fourth Circuit decision affirming Judge James Spencer’s ruling rejecting their claim.

As was described here in detail last week, ACA opponents lost in the Fourth Circuit in a unanimous decision in King v. Burwell but won a split decision in the District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals in Halbig v. Burwell. Carvin is thus seeking Supreme Court review based on a split of authority between the circuits that must be resolved by the Supreme Court.

It is not the intent of this post to review the arguments in Carvin’s brief. Carvin argues that judges Griffith and Randolph made the right decision in Halbig, and that judges Gregory, Thacker and Davis in the Fourth Circuit and Edwards in the D.C. Circuit are wrong. There is really only one new argument in the petition that was not made below, namely that Congress’ intent to deny premium tax credits in states that failed to establish exchanges has now been conclusively established by statements made by Jon Gruber two years after the statute was adopted. This disregards the fact that Gruber neither drafted nor voted on the ACA and had earlier stated that premium tax credits were available in federally facilitated exchange states.

Rather than rehashing the merits, this post will discuss the timing of the petition, the basis on which it can be accepted, and the consequences if it succeeds. Nothing will happen immediately with this petition. The government has 30 days to respond, and can request additional time. The appellants then have 14 days to reply. This puts us into mid-September. It is unlikely, therefore, that the Supreme Court will decide whether or not to accept the petition until it reconvenes in October

Read the rest of this entry »

Taking Stock Of The ACA: The Latest Data From The Health Reform Monitoring Survey


July 29th, 2014

Editor’s note: In addition to Sharon Long, this post is coauthored by Genevieve Kenney, Stephen Zuckerman, and Katherine Hempstead. 

Since early last year, the Urban Institute’s Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) has been collecting relevant, timely data that is providing insights on the implementation of the ACA and changes in health insurance coverage and related outcomes. (An article describing the survey was published in Health Affairs last December.)

Beginning in late 2013, the HRMS set the stage by exploring adults’ understanding of key ACA provisions, their level of health insurance literacy, and expectations about coverage changes in 2014 based on information collected just before the beginning of the first open enrollment period. More recently, the HRMS has shed light on the characteristics of the newly insured, identified who’s not shopping for insurance, and explained how some states’ decisions to expand Medicaid has reduced uninsurance rates.

The HRMS and other surveys have confirmed that the number of uninsured adults has declined significantly since the first open enrollment under the ACA started. On Tuesday July 29th 2014, Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil moderated a panel discussion on what the HRMS shows about the ACA’s performance thus far and what it implies for next year’s open enrollment period. (A recording is available for those who couldn’t join live.) At the event, we released three new policy briefs that, respectively, provide the latest detailed coverage estimates, describe the remaining uninsured, and explore how consumers are navigating the ACA’s Marketplaces.

Here’s a sample of what we’ve learned from this latest release of HRMS data and what was covered at today’s event:

Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: What Makes A State Exchange? (Updated)


July 28th, 2014

One question that has arisen in the wake of the Halbig/King decisions is what exactly is a state exchange? The D.C. Circuit in Halbig and the Fourth Circuit in King seemed unclear as to the answer to this question. The D.C. Circuit counted 14 state exchanges, the Fourth Circuit 16.

A great deal, however, may turn on the answer. Two of the eight federal judges that have ruled on the question so far have held that only state exchanges and not federally facilitated exchanges can issue premium tax credits. Were this conclusion to be adopted in the end by the Supreme Court, which exchanges would count? In other words, how exactly does a state establish an exchange?

A careful reading of the law suggests that a state “establishes” an exchange when, exercising the legal powers of the executive or legislative branch, the state government takes certain actions, discussed below. Establishing the exchange – that is, using the power of state government to enable the exchange to operate and fulfill its responsibilities – is different from the carrying out the day-to-day operations, of the exchange, which might be carried out by public officials, private contractors, or even the federal government.

Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: IRS Releases Premium Tax Credit Rules And Draft Forms


July 25th, 2014

Although the focus of activity the week of July 21 was in the courts, the agencies were not totally silent. On July 24, 2014 the Internal Revenue Service released final and temporary and proposed regulations addressing issues that are presented by the premium tax credit program. The IRS also released drafts of the forms that individuals, insurers, and employers will use for reporting information to the IRS necessary for reconciliation of premium tax credits and for the enforcement of the individual and employer mandate programs. Finally, the IRS set the maximum individual mandate penalty for individuals whose income is high enough that they pay the penalty as a percentage of income rather than a flat dollar amount. This amount is established by the statute as the average cost of a bronze level plan for the applicable family size for 2014 and was set by the IRS at $2,448 per individual annually, up to $12,240 for families of five or more.

The draft forms operationalize the reporting requirements established by rules published earlier. Insurers and self-insured health plans will provide a Form 1095-B to each of their enrollees and members, and file these forms, together with a transmittal form 1094-B with the IRS. Large employers must provide a form 1095-C to each employee, and transmit these, together with a transmittal form 1095-B to the IRS. Exchanges will provide their enrollees a form 1095-A. Individuals who receive premium tax credits will file a form 8962 with the IRS, while individuals claiming an exemption from the individual mandate will file a form 8965. Though the forms are not accompanied by instructions, they are quite straightforward and track closely the earlier released rules.

The final and temporary rules address several situations that will arise under the premium tax credit program that have not yet been addressed by the premium tax credit rules. The temporary rules are identical to the proposed rules and will cease to apply once the proposed rules are finalized.

Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Senator Rebuffed In Challenge To Congressional Participation In ACA Exchanges


July 23rd, 2014

The Halbig and King cases released on July 22, 2014 dramatically overshadowed another court decision released the previous day. That case, Johnson v. U.S. Office of Personnel Management, was important in its own right, however, and is covered here.

On July 21, 2014, Judge William C. Griesbach of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin dismissed a case brought by Wisconsin Republican Senator Ron Johnson and one of his staff members. The plaintiffs claimed that the rule promulgated by the Office of Personnel Management that allows members of Congress and their official staff to purchase health insurance through the exchanges with federal subsidies violates the Affordable Care Act and is unconstitutional. Judge Griesbach held that the plaintiffs had not been injured by the rule and thus had no standing to challenge it. This decision not only disposes of one more ACA challenge, it also calls further into question Congressman John Boehner’s proposed lawsuit challenging other ACA implementation decisions.

The ACA provides that “the only health plans that the Federal Government may make available to Members of Congress and congressional staff” are qualified health plans and plans sold through the exchange. This provision was adopted as an amendment offered by Senator Charles Grassley (R-IA), apparently to challenge the Democrats’ willingness to participate in the same program they were creating for other Americans. This challenge was embraced by the Democrats, however, resulting in the current law.

Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Appellate Decisions Split On Tax Credits In ACA Federal Exchange


July 23rd, 2014

July 22, 2014 was arguably the most important day in the history of the implementation of the Affordable Care Act since the Supreme Court issued its ruling in the National Federation of Independent Business case in June of 2012. As no doubt most readers of this blog know by now, shortly after 10 a.m. the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit handed down its decision in Halbig v. Burwell. Two judges ruled over a strong dissent that an Internal Revenue Service rule allowing federally facilitated exchanges to issue premium tax credits to low and moderate income Americans is invalid.

Approximately two hours later the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, unanimously upheld the IRS rule in King v. Burwell. Combined, the cases contain five judicial opinions, three in the Halbig case and two in King. Four of the six judges voted to uphold the rule, two to strike it down.

The Controversy

The issue in the cases is this: The ACA authorizes the IRS to provide premium tax credits to individuals with household incomes between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level who are not eligible for other minimum essential coverage (such as affordable and adequate employer coverage, Medicaid, or Medicare). Premium tax credits are, however, only available to individuals who purchase coverage through the exchanges.

The ACA requests that the states establish exchanges, and sixteen states and the District of Columbia have done so. The ACA also, however, authorizes the federal government to establish exchanges in states that fail to set up their own exchanges. The federal government has done so in 34 states and is operating the individual exchange for two more. The IRS regulation allows premium tax credits to be awarded to eligible individuals in both states with state-operated exchanges and states with federal exchanges.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Policy Brief Updates


July 22nd, 2014

In the first half of 2014 Health Affairs has released seven new Health Policy Briefs and also has provided updates of five previously released briefs, in order to reflect continuously changing and evolving health policy issues and perspectives.

The following Health Policy Briefs were updated in 2014:

Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Hobby Lobby Response, The ACA In The Territories, And More


July 18th, 2014

July 17, 2014 was a remarkably active day in an otherwise quiet week for Affordable Care Act implementation. First, the Departments of Labor, Treasury, and Health and Human Services issued their first response to the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision —a Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) guidance requiring ERISA plans to provide notice to their participants and beneficiaries if they do not intend to cover contraceptives. Second, the Department of Health and Human Services sent letters to the territories (the Virgin Islands, Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and Puerto Rico) informing them that insurers that market individual insurance policies in the territories are no longer required to comply with the ACA’s insurance market reforms.

Third, HHS released an enrollment bulletin at its REGTAP website describing how insurers in the federally facilitated exchange should handle enrollment for 2015 for individuals whose coverage was terminated in 2014 for non-payment. This post describes these issuances, as well as the May Medicaid enrollment report released on July 11, 2014 by HHS

Read the rest of this entry »

The Medicaid Boom And State Budgets: How Federal Waivers Are Advancing State Flexibility


July 18th, 2014

Note: The authors would like to thank Erica Socker, Senior Research Associate, and Michelle Shaljian, Associate Director of Communications, for their review and editorial assistance.

According to data released by the Department of Health and Human Services, one in five Americans now receive their health insurance through a state Medicaid program. Despite this increase in enrollment, it is estimated that 6 million Americans will likely remain uninsured because 20 states have decided not to expand Medicaid as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) envisioned. There are at least four states that are considering expanding Medicaid but have yet to do so.

Medicaid expansion continues to be one of the most politically charged directives of the health care law, mainly because the Supreme Court decision left the choice to states. This decision has generated an ongoing debate about whether and how states should expand their Medicaid programs. For example, an intense debate has been underway in Virginia, over the decision to include Medicaid expansion in the state budget; putting Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe at odds with the Republican State Legislature. Similar debates are occurring in states across the country, and are further complicated by states’ option to pursue alternative expansion approaches under a Medicaid waiver. For states that have not yet expanded the program, the success of these alternative expansion models may influence whether they can find a politically feasible path forward.

Read the rest of this entry »

ACO Results And Treating Hepatitis C Most-Read Health Affairs Blog Posts For June


July 15th, 2014

In June, Matthew Petersen and David Muhlestein’s post on the cost and quality implications of the accountable care organization (ACO) model on the health care system was the most-read Health Affairs Blog post. Not too far behind was a post on Medicare’s role in treating Hepatitis C from Tricia Neuman, Jack Hoadley, and Juliette Cubanski.

Next was Tim Jost’s examination of the employer mandate and why it should be repealed and replaced, followed by Jon Gabel’s response to a Health Affairs Web First on cancelled non-group plans.

Here’s the full list:

Read the rest of this entry »

Income Verification On The Exchanges: The Broader Policy Picture


July 14th, 2014

The Affordable Care Act scandal de jour (or at least one of them) is the difficulty the exchanges have faced in verifying the eligibility of many premium tax credit applicants. Two Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General Reports in early July documented the existence of these problems. One reported that as of the first quarter of 2014, the federal exchange alone had been unable to resolve 2.6 or 2.9 million data inconsistencies. Another reported that internal controls at the federal and two state exchanges were not fully effective in ensuring that individuals enrolled in exchanges were in fact eligible.

House Republicans claim that in fact there are 4 million data inconsistencies affecting half of all enrollments. In House Energy and Commerce hearings on June 10, 2014, Republican Representative Charles Bustany Jr. claimed that $44 billion in improper payments would be made over the next 10 years. Douglas Holtz-Eakin, a former Bush Administration official, who testified at the hearings claims that improper payments may equal $152 billion. The House Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee is holding further hearings on data inconsistencies on July 16.

The seriousness of verification issues should not be overestimated. The administration has been put in place procedures to verify carefully premium tax credit applications. Many of the discrepancies CMS is attempting to resolve do not relate to income eligibility, and those that do may result ultimately in a finding of eligibility for increased, rather than decreased, premium tax credits. A discrepancy that could result in the need for additional documentation may be as trivial as a hyphen left out of a name or a digit transposed on a Social Security number.

Unfortunately, programs proposed by Republicans and other ACA opponents that in fact make a serious attempt to cover the uninsured will require income reporting and face similar difficulties. Current reform proposals that avoid coverage eligibility determinations will not in fact cover the uninsured. While the administration could have perhaps done a better job in making eligibility determinations, any means-tested program faces a similar challenge. It is possible to design a system that does not rely on means testing and could cover low-income and high-cost uninsured Americans, as I describe below. But it would be a very different system than the ACA or alternatives currently being proposed.

Read the rest of this entry »

ACAView: New Findings On The Effect Of Coverage Expansion Since January 2014


July 9th, 2014

Editor’s note: In addition to Josh Gray, Iyue Sung also coauthored this post. 

Together, athenahealth and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) have undertaken a new joint venture called ACAView, as part of the foundation’s Reform by the Numbers project, a source for timely and unique data on the impact of health reform.

The goal of ACAView is to provide current, non-partisan measurement and analysis on how coverage expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is affecting the day-to-day practice of medicine. athenahealth provides a single-instance, cloud-based software platform to a national provider base.

Any information that our clients enter using our software is immediately aggregated into centrally hosted databases, providing us with timely visibility into patient characteristics, clinical activities, and practice economics at medical groups around the country.

Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Exchange Eligibility Redeterminations; Small Employer Tax Credit


June 27th, 2014

While it seems like the 2014 open enrollment period just ended, the 2015 open enrollment period, which begins on November 15, is in fact only four and a half months away. On June 26, 2014, the Department of Health and Human Services released a proposed rule addressing eligibility redeterminations for 2015. Together with the proposed rule, HHS issued a guidance describing how the federally facilitated exchange intends to redetermine eligibility, as well as draft standard notices for health plans to use when discontinuing or renewing plans in the individual and small group market and instructions for completing those notices.

On the same date, the Internal Revenue Service released final rules governing the small employer tax credit program. This post will discuss these rules and guidances, as well as another court decision rejecting a challenge to the individual mandate and another spate of FAQs on the SHOP exchange program.

Read the rest of this entry »

Click here to email us a new post.




This blog is protected by dr Dave\\\'s Spam Karma 2: 1309844 Spams eaten and counting...