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Health Affairs Briefing: The Cost And Quality Of Cancer Care


March 25th, 2015

Cancer is the second leading cause of death among US adults, and cancer care now costs in excess of $125 billion each year in the United States alone. Cancer has also become the second leading cause of death worldwide, making it an increasing priority in low- and middle-income countries. The April 2015 issue of Health Affairs, “The Cost and Quality of Cancer Care,” includes a collection of papers on the cost and quality of cancer care.

You are invited to join us on Tuesday, April 7, 2015, at a forum featuring authors from the new issue at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. Panels will cover valuing cancer care innovation, paying for care, and quality of cancer care.

WHEN:
Tuesday, April 7, 2015
9:00 a.m. – 11:40 a.m.

WHERE:
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC, 13th Floor

Register Now!

Follow live Tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairsand join in the conversation with #HA_CancerCare.

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What Kind Of Advance Care Planning Should CMS Pay For?


March 19th, 2015

Currently, Medicare does not offer a paid benefit for advance care planning (ACP). As a result, health care providers who want to assist Medicare enrollees with ACP do so voluntarily and neither they, nor their institutions, are compensated for their time and efforts. This is not only an unfair expectation on individual practitioners or health institutions, it is also medically and ethically unsound. Fortunately, two recent events have the potential to reshape the landscape of advance care planning in the U.S.

Cultural And Policy Evolution In Advance Care Planning

On September 17, 2014, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual Preferences Near the End of Life. The report is built on two basic premises:

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New Narrative Matters: How Health Care Fails Older Patients, And How It Can Be Done Better


March 13th, 2015

Health Affairs‘ March Narrative Matters essay features a chance meeting between an octogenarian and a geriatrician that shows how the US health system focuses on medical care at the expense of older adults’ well-being. Louise Aronson’s article is freely available to all readers, or you can listen to the podcast.

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Reconciling Prevention And Value In The Health Care System


March 11th, 2015

The term ‘value’ (commonly defined as health improvements attained per dollar spent) has become ubiquitous in discussions around improving the health care system. Increasingly, payers are adopting value-based purchasing programs (paying more for higher value care) and providing benefits that follow the principles of value-based insurance design (aligning patient cost-sharing with the value of the service). These programs typically focus on services widely regarded as relatively low-cost and clinically effective, such as beta-blockers prescribed for patients following a myocardial infarction (i.e. heart attack).

Simultaneously, there is widespread enthusiasm for the increased use of preventive services. The Patient Protection and Affordable Act (ACA) mandates the elimination of consumer cost sharing for selected preventive services in marketplace plans and many other individual health plans. A particular subset of plans, High-Deductible Health Plans with Health Savings Accounts (HSA-HDHPs) can cover certain preventive services—but not other services—before the deductible, a minimum of $1,250 for an individual and $2,500 for a family, is met.

Generally, policies supporting prevention and value are consistent. Many (not all) preventive services do provide considerable value. Yet as with value, there are nuances in the definition of prevention that can lead to suboptimal policy choices. Specifically, most policy related to prevention defines preventive services as those delivered to asymptomatic individuals.

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Effective Public Engagement To Improve Palliative Care For Serious Illness


March 10th, 2015

Editor’s note: This post is part of a periodic Health Affairs Blog series on palliative care, health policy, and health reform. The series features essays adapted from and drawing on a recent volume, Meeting the Needs of Older Adults with Serious Illness: Challenges and Opportunities in the Age of Health Care Reform, in which clinicians, researchers and policy leaders address 16 key areas where real-world policy options to improve access to quality palliative care could have a substantial role in improving value.

Public engagement is necessary to improve care for individuals suffering with serious illness. Fortunately, several drivers of potential change exist for advocacy. In the following blog post, we outline some areas for change and specify advocacy efforts we can undertake to improve the overall face of palliative care.

First, palliative care here is defined as being a type of specialized medical care for people with serious illness. Its goal is to improve quality of life for both person and family. It is provided by a team of doctors, nurses, and other specialists who work with the patient’s other providers to provide an extra layer of support. Although some people think palliative care is only for those at the end of life, it is actually appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness and can be provided together with curative or disease-modifying treatment.

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The Challenges Of Developing A Sustainable Network For The Care Of The Chronically Ill


February 11th, 2015

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series of several posts related to the 4th European Forum on Health Policy and Management: Innovation & Implementation, held in Berlin, Germany on January 29 and 30, 2015. For updates on the Forum’s results please check the Center for Healthcare Management’s website or follow on Twitter @HCMatColumbia.

Health care systems the world over are searching for new organizational models to deliver better clinical outcomes, improved customer satisfaction, and lower costs. In any such systems, quality will no longer be the sole province of clinicians and the responsibility for cost containment will no longer fall solely on payors. Increasingly, clinical care and social service providers, patients, and payors alike have a role to play in achieving the best clinical outcomes for patients and the best economic outcomes for the system as a whole, signifying a value based health delivery system.

As primary and acute care networks embark on this move from volume to value, the special needs of chronic populations, those that comprise 45 percent of domestic health care spending — or $1.2 trillion annually, can easily be lost and, with them, the ability to address a very significant gap between quality outcomes and cost controls.

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How Hepatitis C Is Shining A Light On Critical Gaps In Payment Reform


February 3rd, 2015

Since December 2013, regulatory approval of new treatments for hepatitis C have brought long simmering debates on drug pricing and value to full boil. The drugs—Gilead’s Sovaldi and successor combination treatment Harvoni, AbbVie’s Viekira Pak—represent significant steps forward for treatment in hepatitis C, demonstrating cure rates well above 90 percent in the clinical trial setting as well as greater tolerability for patients.

This unprecedented effectiveness, however, has come at a high cost, with treatment ranging from $63,000 for an eight-week course of Harvoni on the low end to above $150,000 for Sovaldi in combination with other products on the high end. This is likely to be representative of a wave of similar products coming through the drug development pipeline: highly targeted, highly effective, and highly priced.

Also indicative of things to come are the steps some groups are taking to blunt the impact of increased spending on hepatitis C treatments, such as formulary adjustments or prioritized coverage for particular subsets of the hepatitis C patient community. Days after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved AbbVie’s Viekira Pak in December 2014, for example, the largest pharmacy benefit management company in the United States, Express Scripts, announced that the drug regimen would be the only hepatitis C treatment on its preferred list of covered drugs.

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Is Bias A Source Of Unmet Needs For Medically Complex Kids?


February 2nd, 2015

A study on the “Inequities In Health Care Needs For Children With Medical Complexity,” published in the December 2014 issue of Health Affairs on children’s health, supports a suspicion I have had for some time. Children with medical complexity face the possibility of unmet health care needs simply because of who they are.

Dennis Kuo and colleagues found that children with medical complexity had higher unmet needs than children without medical complexity. The authors describe medical complexity as “children who require medical services beyond what is typically required by children with special health care needs.”

This inequity holds regardless of race, ethnicity, insurance coverage, and household income in relation to poverty level. In other words, unmet needs remain high even among those who have favorable social determinants of health care. The authors conclude that medical complexity itself may be an independent determinant of health care inequity for children.

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Resilience, Speaking Up, Reframing: Reflections On Recovery


January 27th, 2015

In October 2014—nearly three years after an auto-pedestrian accident that left me unable to walk—I embarked on a six-day bicycle trip through the Sicilian countryside. An account of the earlier accident and my uneven care experience appeared in the June 2014 issue of Health Affairs (‘Nothing is Broken’: For an Injured Doctor, Quality-Focused Care Misses the Mark), and excerpted in The Washington Post.

Despite major improvements in my gait at the two-year mark of physical therapy, I am still cane-dependent, and my orthopedist noted to me that I would never be able to bike again.

Surely, this was on my mind when I arrived at the hotel in Sicily and was sized up and down by 22 other members of the biking group, many looking like veteran cyclists. They all watched closely as I ambled toward the hotel…with my cane. Their warm welcome belied a willing suspension of disbelief.

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How Policy Makers In Emerging Health Systems Can Advance Innovative Care For The Chronically Ill


January 15th, 2015

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series of several posts related to the 4th European Forum on Health Policy and Management: Innovation & Implementation, to be held in Berlin, Germany on January 29 and 30, 2015. For more information or to request your personal invitation contact info@centerforhealthcaremanagement.org or follow @HCMatColumbia.

Discussions of innovation in health care often focus on new technologies, big data, and refined population health strategies within the context of mature Western health care systems. But innovation is just as important, with perhaps greater impact, in evolving systems where more foundational opportunities exist to deliver affordable, quality care to the most expensive and challenging patients: those with chronic illnesses. In that context, public policy and regulation can spur innovation.

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Health Affairs Web First: New Medicare Per Capita Spending Shows A Rise With Age, Then A Decline After 96


January 14th, 2015

New analysis of Medicare spending from 2000–11 found that in 2011 per capita spending increased with age, from $7,566 for beneficiaries age seventy to $16,145 at age ninety-six, and then declining for even older beneficiaries. The study authors Patricia Neuman, Juliette Cubanski, and Anthony Damico also found that since 2000, the age that Medicare per capita spending peaks has increased each year: In 2000, the highest spending was found to be among those age ninety-two.

They also found that Medicare beneficiaries ages eighty and older, who comprised 24 percent of the beneficiaries, accounted for a disproportionate share (33 percent) of traditional Medicare spending in 2011. This study, being released by Health Affairs as a Web First, is part of its re-established DataWatch series, which features timely health-related data and surveys.

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Health Affairs’ January Issue: Aging And Health


January 5th, 2015

The January issue of Health Affairs includes a number of studies examining issues pertaining to aging and health or health care. Other subjects covered include: the effect of Medicare’s Hospital Compare quality reports on hospital prices; how the Affordable Care Act’s provisions impact Americans shouldering high medical cost burdens; and whether California’s Hospital Fair Pricing Act has benefited uninsured patients.

Content on aging and health was supported by the John A. Hartford Foundation.

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Adverse Events In Older Adults: The Need For Better Long-Term Care Financing And Delivery Innovation


November 20th, 2014

Evidence mounts that a major disconnect exists between the services most frail older adults need and what they get. The vast majority of frail older adults (around 75 percent) who face challenges in taking care of themselves live at home. According to new research from Vicki Freedman and Brenda Stillman, published in the most recent issue of The Milbank Quarterly, almost a third of these older adults report having an adverse consequence as a result of not getting the help they need. These consequences are pretty grim – the most frequently reported event being wet clothes associated with an unmet need around toileting.

But the most shocking statistic from this research is that hiring a paid helper appears to do little to protect against these consequences. Among those who hired help, nearly 60 percent reported adverse consequences. No doubt this reflects a higher level of need: paid helpers are brought in when the risk is quite high. But, it also reflects an inadequacy in support — an analogous group living in supportive housing (i.e., residential care or assisted living facilities) reported these events at a much lower rate (36 percent).

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Health Affairs Web First: In 11-Country Survey Of Older Adults, Americans Are Sickest But Have Quickest Access To Specialists


November 20th, 2014

A new survey of the health and care experiences of older adults in eleven different countries, released recently as a Web First by Health Affairs, found that Americans were sicker than their counterparts abroad, with 68 percent of respondents living with two or more chronic conditions and 53 percent taking four or more medications. Also, Americans were most likely to report cost-related expenses for care (19 percent of respondents) than residents in any of the other countries surveyed.

On the other hand, the United States compared favorably in some aspects: For example, 83 percent of US respondents had a treatment plan they could carry out in their daily life, one of the highest rates across the surveyed countries.

A few other key findings:

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Challenges For People With Disabilities Within The Health Care Safety Net


November 18th, 2014

Medicare and Medicaid were passed to serve as safety nets for the country’s most vulnerable populations, a point that has been reemphasized by the expansion of the populations they serve, especially with regards to Medicaid. Yet, even after 50 years, the disabled population continues to be one whose health care needs are not being met. This community is all too frequently left to suffer health disparities due to cultural incompetency, stigma and misunderstanding, and an inability to create policy changes that cover the population as a whole and their acute and long-term needs.

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Risk And Reform Of Long-Term Care


November 14th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series of several posts stemming from presentations given at “The Law of Medicare and Medicaid at Fifty,” a conference held at Yale Law School on November 6 and 7.

The 50th Anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid offers an opportunity to reflect on how U.S. social policy has conceived of the problem of long-term care.

Social insurance programs aim to create greater security—typically financial security—for American families (See Note 1). Programs for long-term care, however, have had mixed results. The most recent attempt at reform, which Ted Kennedy ushered through as a part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), called the CLASS Act, was actuarially unsound and later repealed. Medicare and especially Medicaid, the two primary government programs to address long-term care needs, are criticized for failing to meet the needs of people with a disability or illness, who need long-term services or supports. These critiques are valid.

Even more troublesome, however, long-term care policy, especially in its most recent evolution toward home-based care, has intensified a second type of insecurity for Americans. This insecurity arises when someone becomes responsible for the long-term care of a loved one. In a longer forthcoming article, I argue that this insecurity—which I call “next-friend risk”—poses a serious threat to Americans and needs to be addressed. (I borrow the phrase next friend from a legal term for a person who in litigation represents someone with a disability who is otherwise unable to represent him or herself. Although not a legal guardian, the next friend protects the interests of an incompetent person.)

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Reforming Medicare: What Does The Public Want?


November 13th, 2014

Is Medicare adequately meeting the needs of seniors, or are there ways that its core attributes could be improved? Numerous elected officials, policymakers, and other thought leaders have offered perspectives on ways to change the program. Few efforts, however, have been directed at understanding how the public—given accurate information, a variety of options, and a valid structure for weighing the pros and cons—would change Medicare’s basic design.

The MedCHAT Project

Recently, the American Enterprise Institute and the Brookings Institution co-hosted a briefing on the results of a California project that did just that. The “MedCHAT” project, sponsored by the nonprofit, nonpartisan Center for Healthcare Decisions, asked 800 residents—the lay public, as well as health care professionals and community leaders—to consider Medicare’s current benefits and decide if those should be changed. Respondents represented the full spectrum of age, race, ethnicity, education, and income level.

Using an interactive, computer-based system, participants were asked to respond as “social decisionmakers;” they were tasked with making Medicare more responsive to the needs of current and future generations without imposing a greater cost burden on the country. The computer-based CHAT (“Choosing All Together”) program uses actuarial estimates to show the relative costs of health care benefits, allowing participants to make trade-offs with an understanding of the fiscal impact each benefit has on the program.

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Social Insurance Is Missing A Piece: Medicare, Medicaid, And Long-term Care


November 6th, 2014

Editor’s note: This is the first of several periodic posts stemming from presentations to be given at “The Law of Medicare and Medicaid at Fifty,” a conference that will be held at Yale Law School on November 6 and 7. The issues covered in this post and in Professor Feder’s presentation at the conference will be more fully treated in Feder J. “The Missing Piece:  Medicare, Medicaid and Long-Term Care,” in Cohen AB, Colby DC, Wailoo KA, Zelizer JE, eds. Medicare and Medicaid at 50: America’s Entitlement Programs in the Age of Affordable Care. New York: Oxford, 2015.

Medicare and Medicaid are partners in providing health insurance protection to older people and people with disabilities. But when it comes to helping the very same people with long-term care—assistance with the basic tasks of daily life (like bathing, eating and toileting)—no such partnership exists.  Instead, there’s a gaping hole in protection that leaves people who need care, along with their families, at risk of catastrophe.

That hole is not an accident.  From Medicare’s inception, long-term care was explicitly excluded from its social insurance benefits, despite the close tie of many long-term care needs to medical conditions.  With some short-lived lapses, Medicare rules have restricted the program’s benefits to avoid financing long-term care, even as it has overpaid long-term care providers for medically-related “post-acute” services. Ironically, Medicare has fueled growth in expenditures on long-term care providers without actually covering long-term care.

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Examining State Prison Health Care Spending: Cost Drivers And Policy Approaches


November 4th, 2014

Health care and corrections have emerged as fiscal pressure points for states in recent years as rapid spending growth in each area has competed for finite revenue. Not surprisingly, health care spending for prison inmates—the intersection of these two spheres—also has risen swiftly.

Yet this trend of rising health care costs for prisoners may have been reversed in many states, according to a new report by the State Health Care Spending Project, a collaboration between The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Total correctional health care expenditures and per-inmate spending increased in nearly all states from fiscal years 2007 to 2011, but in most states it began declining after peaking in 2009 and 2010. Nationwide, prison health care spending totaled $7.7 billion in 2011, down from a high of $8.2 billion in 2009, after adjusting for inflation. The downturn in spending stemmed in part from a reduction in state prison populations.

As states work to manage prison health care expenditures, a decrease in spending was a positive development as long as it did not come at the expense of access to good quality care. Yet states continue to face a variety of challenges that threaten to drive costs back up. Chief among these is a steadily aging prison population.

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Turning Family Caregivers Into A Political Force


October 1st, 2014

Suzanne Mintz’s memorable Narrative Matters essay in the September issue of Health Affairs calls for attention to and support for family caregivers, and puts many important policy and practice improvements on the policy table. But the piece stops just a step short of giving voice to the fury that is needed to mobilize change. Why are family caregivers so polite? We ask for the bare essentials and say “please.” We beg for mere recognition and some honesty about the situation. Why are we so polite?

Are we waiting for hospitals, specialty physicians, health systems, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and others who are deeply invested in current patterns of care, thinking they might wake up one morning and start advocating against short-term self-interest? Or set out to learn about supportive services and family caregivers?

Of course, everyone loves family caregivers. Virtually anyone over the age of 50 can share tear-inducing stories of someone’s devotion to a frail elderly parent or a long-term disabled friend or relative. But we, the public, respond to the despair and frustration of family caregivers with the same shrug we give to young mothers whose lives are suddenly governed by feedings and changings. Our response to family caregivers has to change. The challenges are so great, and the level of support so deficient, for so many family caregivers.

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