Blog Home

Archive for the 'Medicare' Category




New Health Policy Brief: Risk Corridors (Updated)


February 26th, 2015

The latest Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) provides an update to an earlier brief on the Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s risk corridor program, which allows the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to collect and make payments to qualified health plans. As the brief explains, a recent amendment to federal appropriations raises questions as to whether insurers will receive their full risk corridor payments for 2014.

While the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act of 2015, which funded the government for the 2015 fiscal year, did give HHS the authority to collect user fees, an amendment was included that specifically prohibited HHS from transferring money from either trust fund.

The amendment did not eliminate the risk corridor program, nor did it prevent HHS from using payments received from insurers to pay out claims under the program (that is, user fees), but it effectively made the risk corridor program budget neutral unless HHS can find another source of funding. As a result, insurers expecting payments from HHS may not receive the full amount due.

Read the rest of this entry »

An Era Of Precision Medicine And Rapid Learning


February 20th, 2015

At a recent White House event, President Obama presented his proposals for a Precision Medicine Initiative. The key elements include a national research system where 1 million or more volunteers can share their (privacy protected) electronic health records, genetics, and other data, and a national cancer initiative. The proposals will be developed in more detail based on meetings led by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Francis Collins.

If national health policy adopts these proposals, much about today’s medical care system—including biomedical science, medical education, diagnostics, treatment options, comparative effectiveness research, quality metrics, payment systems, the role of patients, the personalization of medical care and prevention, and an understanding of the roles of environment, nutrition, culture, and many other factors—may greatly change.

The Obama administration proposes a highly collaborative, non-partisan public-private process. These proposals bring the era of “big data” to the center of the heath policy arena (see the July 2014 Health Affairs theme issue, “Using Big Data To Transform Care”). Many in the health system may want to take part in developing the proposals and being part of the implementation.

Read the rest of this entry »

How Open Data Can Reveal—And Correct—The Faults In Our Health System


February 18th, 2015

In April 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) released millions of lines of Medicare Part B physician payment data, that led many researchers, analysts, journalists, and the general public to use the data to answer a number of pressing health care questions. And while the dataset does not include patient-level information, it does offer provider identifiers, which can facilitate data aggregation, highlight practice patterns, and cost trends (i.e. specialties with disproportionately higher payments and individual providers as “outliers”).

Our goal here, like many before us, is to highlight striking disparities in this dataset (despite its limitations); attempt to understand why they occur; and provide opportunities to address them.We examine three major issues: geographic variation; individual provider variation; and variation across care settings. Finally, we outline recommendations for future data releases to encourage more practical analyses.

Geographic Variation in Practice Patterns

A popular example highlighted by the CMS data was the rate of use of Lucentis — a drug prescribed for patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although a clinical study demonstrated similar outcomes for Lucentis ($2,000 per dose) versus Avastin ($50 per dose), the CMS data revealed total Lucentis spending of $1 billion.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: Recent US Hospital Productivity Growth


February 11th, 2015

Between 2002 and 2011, US hospitals increased their productivity in treating Medicare patients for several serious illnesses, refuting fears about a “cost disease” in health care and potentially mitigating concerns about provider payment under the Affordable Care Act.

The study, released today by Health Affairs as a Web First, addresses the quality of care and the severity of patient illness (considerations not fully taken into account by previous studies on this topic) found that during those years, the annual rates of productivity growth were 0.78 percent for heart attacks, 0.62 percent for heart failure, and 1.90 percent for pneumonia.

When the authors John Romley, Dana Goldman, and Neeraj Sood calculated productivity growth rates without factoring in trends in the severity of patient conditions or outcomes achieved after hospitalization, the annual productivity rates were different: -0.64 percent for heart attacks, -0.91 percent for heart failure, and -0.39 percent for pneumonia.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs’ February Issue: Biomedical Innovation


February 2nd, 2015

The February issue of Health Affairs includes a number of studies examining issues pertaining to biomedical innovation. Some of the subjects covered: how declining economic returns for new drugs may affect future investments, the changing landscape of Medicare coverage determinations for medical interventions, the slowly emerging US biosimilar market, and more.

With declining economic returns, can manufacturers afford to continue investing?

Ernst Berndt of Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Alfred P. Sloan School of Management and coauthors compared present values of average lifetime pharmaceutical revenues to present values of average drug research and development, and lifetime operating costs. Upon examining new prescription drugs launched over four distinct time periods between 1991 and 2009, the authors found that net economic returns reached a peak in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


January 30th, 2015

On January 29, Jason Shafrin at Health Care Economist published a “Super Bowl” edition of the Health Wonk Review. Jason’s round-up contains no hot air, but it’s not at all deflating — it includes two Health Affairs Blog posts on the present and future of Medicare ACOs by Mark McClellan and coauthors and Scott Heiser and coauthors.

We also want to give a delayed shout-out to the nice “shake the winter blahs” Health Wonk Review that Vince Kuraitis published at e-CareManagement on January 15. Vince included a Health Affairs Blog post by Uwe Reinhardt reacting to Jonathan Gruber’s controversial remarks and explaining why Americans aren’t stupid but are often ignorant about policy issues.

Read the rest of this entry »

Exhibit Of The Month: California’s Hospital Fair Pricing Act Reduces Amount Paid By Uninsured


January 29th, 2015

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Monthseries. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month’s exhibit, published in the January issue of Health Affairs, looks at the proportion of hospital charges to and collections from uninsured patients in California from 2003 to 2012.

In the article, “California’s Hospital Fair Pricing Act Reduced The Prices Actually Paid By Uninsured Patients,” author Ge Bai of the Williams School of Commerce, Economics, and Politics at Washington and Lee University, examines how the Hospital Fair Pricing Act affects the net price paid by uninsured patients.

Read the rest of this entry »

New Health Policy Brief: The Two-Midnight Rule


January 23rd, 2015

A new policy brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) examines the so-called “two-midnight rule,” which takes effect on April 1 of this year for new Medicare hospital claims. The rule, announced in 2013, is an effort by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to clarify when a patient will be considered by Medicare as an inpatient for hospital billing purposes. Under this rule, only patients that a doctor expects to need two nights in the hospital would be considered inpatients for the purpose of Medicare claims.

In the past, CMS provided little guidance to hospitals on this matter. This is important because the Medicare payment structures are very different for inpatients versus outpatients: Hospitals are reimbursed with a single comprehensive payment for all care provided to an inpatient during his or her time at the hospital, but they are paid standard fees for each unique service they provide to outpatients. This brief describes the perceived need by CMS for the two-midnight rule, how it would work, the implications for Medicare payment, and the heated response to the rule by the hospital industry.

Read the rest of this entry »

Early Evidence On Medicare ACOs And Next Steps For The Medicare ACO Program (Updated)


January 22nd, 2015

Note: Pratyusha Katikaneni and Carmen Diaz also contributed to this post. They are both research assistants at the Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform, The Brookings Institution.

On December 1, CMS released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), which requests feedback for changes CMS is considering for the Medicare accountable care organization (ACO) programs in 2016 and beyond. The proposal suggests significant potential alterations to the program, many of which we recently reviewed, that would address major issues that ACOs and others have raised: uncertainty and inexperience at transitioning to increasing levels of risk, lack of timely and accurate data, changes in attributed patient populations from year-to-year, and financial benchmarks that fail to account for regional variations and continue to reward high ACO performance over time.

The proposed rule raises more issues than it settles, but it clearly indicates that CMS is open to meaningful public comments and will make important revisions in the MSSP. However, the proposal also illustrates the challenges of resolving these issues in a way that both assures substantial ACO participation and improvement, as well as Medicare savings.

Ideally, big changes in key features in a major program like the MSSP would be based on extensive empirical evidence on what determines success in the program. Unfortunately, only limited evidence, including case studies and some comparative data, is available on the determinants of success for Medicare ACOs, and thus on the MSSP. Data released by CMS in September, which we previously reviewed, showed that the MSSP has generated over $700 million in savings to date relative to the spending benchmarks in the program. This is around 1 percent of the costs of care for beneficiaries affected by Medicare ACO initiatives.

Read the rest of this entry »

Unpacking The Medicare Shared Savings Proposed Rule: Geography And Policy


January 22nd, 2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently announced a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). The rulemaking contains several proposals that if enacted, would fundamentally change the underlying incentives for providers to participate in the program. These proposed reforms address issues such as data sharing, renewals of participation agreements, beneficiary attribution, incentives to move to two-sided risk, and lastly, reforms to the benchmark calculations against which ACOs compete to earn savings.

The NPRM comes on the heels of a September 16, 2014 release of performance results for MSSP ACOs that began their performance years by 2013. Under the current program rules, ACOs that successfully reported quality performance data and whose savings exceeded their “minimum savings rate” were eligible to share in savings with Medicare. The MSSP program allows ACOs to choose either one-sided risk (Track 1, only upside potential to earn savings) or two-sided risk (Track 2, both upside and downside potential to earn savings/incur losses) with the final sharing amount based on achieving quality targets (up to 50 percent for Track 1 and 60 percent for Track 2). A vast majority of ACOs enrolled in Track 1, the one-sided risk option. Of the 220 ACOs in the program that participated in the first performance year, 53 earned shared savings, 52 saved money but not enough to meet the required “minimum savings rates,” and the other 115 did not accrue savings (spending on patients assigned to the ACO was greater than projected).

In February 2014, the CMS asked stakeholders for input as to how to improve its ACO programs, feedback which they used to generate the NPRM. Many ACOs and other stakeholders argued that failures to achieve savings over and above minimum savings rates were a partial result of residing in low spending areas. In this post, we examine the merits of this contention and consider the policy implications of our results and their bearing on some of the modifications of the MSSP program that CMS has proposed. We also discuss other strategies for improving the program CMS did not mention in the NPRM.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: New Medicare Per Capita Spending Shows A Rise With Age, Then A Decline After 96


January 14th, 2015

New analysis of Medicare spending from 2000–11 found that in 2011 per capita spending increased with age, from $7,566 for beneficiaries age seventy to $16,145 at age ninety-six, and then declining for even older beneficiaries. The study authors Patricia Neuman, Juliette Cubanski, and Anthony Damico also found that since 2000, the age that Medicare per capita spending peaks has increased each year: In 2000, the highest spending was found to be among those age ninety-two.

They also found that Medicare beneficiaries ages eighty and older, who comprised 24 percent of the beneficiaries, accounted for a disproportionate share (33 percent) of traditional Medicare spending in 2011. This study, being released by Health Affairs as a Web First, is part of its re-established DataWatch series, which features timely health-related data and surveys.

Read the rest of this entry »

Graduate Medical Education: The Need For New Leadership In Governance And Financing


January 14th, 2015

With the creation of the Medicare program in 1965, a funding stream was established to support the training of medical residents who provided care for Medicare beneficiaries. In subsequent years, Medicare has maintained these payments to teaching hospitals and remains the largest payer for Graduate Medical Education (GME), with expenditures totaling about $10 billion annually. This represents two-thirds of Federal GME support, with another $4 billion per year provided to hospitals through State Medicaid GME support.

This expenditure was a major motivation for the Senate Finance Committee to request the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to issue a report entitled “Graduate Medical Education That Meets the Nation’s Health Needs.”  The Report proposed major reforms to create a GME system with greater transparency, accountability and strategic direction, in order to increase its contribution to achieving the nation’s health goals. Prior to publication of this long awaited report on July 29, 2014, GME financing policies received substantial attention in the last two sessions of Congress, with a particular focus on increasing the number of federally funded GME positions. The House and Senate committees with GME jurisdiction produced multiple legislative initiatives.

However, there was considerable opposition from primary care stakeholders to some of the proposed changes because of inadequate emphasis on ambulatory training. Possible redistribution of Medicare GME funding was also of concern to many. This seemed to dissuade Congress from passing reform of GME policies. Nevertheless, 1,500 new GME positions were authorized in the recent Veterans Health Administration legislation.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Challenge Of Financing Sustainable Community-Based Palliative Care Programs


December 29th, 2014

Since its publication in September 2014, there has been widespread praise for the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual Preferences Near the End of Life. It is a masterful piece of scholarship that summarizes the spectrum of issues facing palliative care.

We hope the report will influence key decision-makers in medicine and various legislatures to promote the many changes outlined in the document, enabling palliative care to further improve the quality of life for those with advanced illness.

Yet, despite the encyclopedic scope of Dying in America, the report did not make suggestions about how to achieve sustainable funding for community-based palliative care. Freestanding programs provide special value to some of the sickest members of the population who struggle with their serious illness while living in the community, outside any facility or hospice program.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Medicare Shared Savings Program: CMS Turns To Stakeholders On Incentivizing ACO Risk


December 19th, 2014

On December 1, 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) released its long awaited Proposed Rule to update regulation and operation of the Medicare Shared Savings Program (“MSSP”). In response to concerns raised by participating accountable care organizations, CMS proposes to revise the MSSP program in several ways to provide greater flexibility for ACOs.

However, in important areas CMS may not have gone far enough. This post describes the framework CMS has set forth and then suggests several ways in which the proposal could, in our view, be improved to achieve the CMS objective of encouraging ACOs to bear more risk. In particular, CMS should consider using its waiver authority more robustly; allowing Medicare beneficiaries to designate their primary care providers, and by extension their ACO; and revising the MSSP risk-adjustment methodology to better reflect the changing risk profiles of ACOs.

CMS is actively seeking stakeholder input, which may indicate agency recognition that further changes beyond those in the propose rule are needed. By all indications, stakeholder input will be seriously considered; more than any time in recent memory, stakeholder comments will make a difference in the shape of the Final Rule. This presents a unique opportunity for stakeholders and we urge concerned parties to share their perspectives through comments – the deadline for submitting comments is February 6, 2015.

Read the rest of this entry »

ACO Quality Results: Good But Not Great


December 18th, 2014

On September 23, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released Year 1 Quality Performance results for Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) that began participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) in 2012 or 2013. Another report, released shortly before, outlined financial performance of the ACOs and showed that only 49 ACOs, or 22 percent of those ACOs, qualified for shared savings payments by successfully reducing total spending.

Opportunity for continued quality improvement aside, a troublesome snag for the program could be a very low correlation between improved quality and earned savings: our analysis shows that, in performance year one, improved quality and earned savings only correlate at 8.6 percent, so low that it is statistically insignificant (Figure 1).

In practice, this means that better quality is not associated with better financial results. Twenty-one of the 49 ACOs that did earn shared savings actually scored below the average quality of the group. For the first year, quality outcomes did not affect the size of shared savings payments, but in future years ACOs that perform poorly on quality measures will lose a portion of any shared savings.

Read the rest of this entry »

New Health Policy Brief: Physician Compare


December 16th, 2014

A new policy brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) looks at the evolution and current development plans for Physician Compare, a website mandated by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). A simple version of the site first launched in 2010.

Since then the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has slowly been adding limited sets of data listing the various physician groups participating in a number of Medicare quality improvement initiatives. In 2015 the site will expand to include more recent and extensive information about physician performance and quality of care, in a format that’s similar to the other ACA-generated websites — Hospital Compare, Nursing Home Compare, Home Health Compare, and Dialysis Facility Compare.

These sites, which encompass tens of thousands of facilities nationwide, are credited with advancing accountability and motivating improvements in care and quality. They are also faulted as poorly organized and inadequately audited when the data are submitted by facilities.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Accidental Administrative Law Of Policymaking In The Medicare Program


December 11th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series of several posts stemming from presentations given at “The Law of Medicare and Medicaid at Fifty,” a conference held at Yale Law School on November 6 and 7.

When Congress establishes a new regulatory program, it lodges the program in a regulatory agency or executive department. A regulatory agency generally has presidentially appointed commissioners with staggered terms and expert staff. This design provides insulation from politics and facilitates applying technical expertise to regulatory problems. Also, administrative agencies make rules and policy and have the powers of investigation, adjudication, and sanction to enforce compliance. Administrative law, an essential instrument of democracy, regulates the operation and procedures of government agencies.

The Social Security Amendments of 1965 established Medicare in the Social Security Administration (SSA). Medicare initially contained two parts, hospital insurance for hospital and related services and supplementary medical insurance for physician and other outpatient services. Pursuant to contract, Medicare contractors handle claims and pay providers as well as adjudicate appeals and make program policy.

This post chronicles the development administrative law, policymaking, and regulation in the Medicare program. It describes how the program evolved a revolutionary collaborative model of regulation that could provide a useful guide for other programs.

Read the rest of this entry »

Two Theologies Have Blocked Medicare-For-All


December 11th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series of several posts stemming from presentations given at “The Law of Medicare and Medicaid at Fifty,” a conference held at Yale Law School on November 6 and 7.

In the 50 years since Medicare was enacted, Congress has never seriously considered extending Medicare to all Americans, nor even lowering Medicare’s eligibility age below 65. This pattern persisted even during those periods when national health insurance was at the top of the national agenda. This is not what the original advocates of Medicare anticipated when Medicare was enacted in 1965. They saw Medicare as the cornerstone of a national system of health insurance that would eventually cover all Americans.

Two Myths that Undercut Medicare-for-All: Managed Care and Competition

In the paper we presented at the Yale conference, we reviewed short- and long-term factors affecting the debate about Medicare over its lifetime, and then turned to a discussion of two long-term factors: the rise of what came to be called the managed care movement, and the resurgence of a longstanding campaign promoting the idea that competition can right the wrongs of American medicine.

Read the rest of this entry »

CMS Proposes Coverage For Lung Cancer Screening With Low Dose CT


December 9th, 2014

On November 11, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released its Proposed Decision Memo for Screening Lung Cancer with Low Dose Computed Tomography (LDCT), which is expected to be finalized in mid-December. Despite a negative assessment by its own advisory committee, CMS has proposed coverage with evidence development (CED) for an annual “lung cancer screening counseling and shared-decision-making visit” and, for appropriate beneficiaries, additional screening with LDCT.

Under CED, Medicare provides conditional coverage for a new treatment or technology while additional data is collected to confirm its effectiveness and make a final determination. Through this proposed decision, CMS has followed the lead of numerous other expert and advisory groups, which have concluded that the overall benefits of such screening for at-risk individuals outweigh concerns regarding gaps in evidence, generalizability and potential harms.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Council On Graduate Medical Education (COGME)—Not Yet Ready For End-Of-Life Care


December 4th, 2014

In November, 1985, twenty-nine years ago, members of the first session of the 99th Congress addressed growing concern and controversy regarding Graduate Medical Education (GME). Although Medicare had financed GME for the previous twenty years, Congress began to recognize that our rapidly evolving health care system could require significant changes in the composition of our physician workforce, and that these changes could impact the appropriate governance and funding of GME.

In this setting, the Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME) was conceived and underwent rapid gestation, with its birth achieved via enactment of authorizing legislation in 1986. Its charter charged the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), under Title VII of the Public Health Service Act, with responsibility for taking national leadership in the development of policies related to GME, and in the research, development, and analysis of such policies that impact on the health workforce needs of the nation. COGME was instructed to provide advice and make policy recommendations to the Secretary and committees of the House and Senate within their jurisdiction.

Contrary to a sunset provision in the legislation, COGME still survives. While continuing to function on very limited support, it recently issued a noteworthy report entitled “Improving Value in Graduate Medical Education” in 2013. COGME presently is preparing its 22nd Report, which addresses the need for change in GME due to changes in the U.S. health care system and focuses on opportunities to improve training through more effective targeting of public resources.

Read the rest of this entry »

Click here to email us a new post.