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How Menu Labeling Could Spark Change Beyond The Menu Board


February 24th, 2015

If there’s one thing we’ve learned about catalyzing changes that prevent illness in the first place, it’s that passage of a single policy can be like lighting a match — illuminating the way towards strategies with greater impact and igniting the energy of leaders. The success of a menu labeling might be the match needed to inspire further policy change to shift the trend of increased diet-related chronic disease in the United States.

In November, the Food and Drug Administration released the final rule guiding calorie labeling of menu items at chain food service establishments with 20 or more outlets nationally. The rule will apply to fast-food and sit-down restaurants, supermarkets, convenience stores and movie theaters, and will take effect on December 1, 2015.

Once implemented, calorie counts will be posted for all items (including alcoholic drinks) on menus and menu-boards, and on display tags for salad bars, bakery items, and soda dispensers. A companion rule requiring calorie labeling for vending machines will take effect one year later.

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Indirect Effects From Menu Labeling Can Improve The Public’s Health


February 24th, 2015

Just this past November, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released sweeping final rules requiring that calorie information be posted on menus, menu boards, and vending machines. The regulations expand the proposed rule to include a wide variety of food outlets with more than 20 locations: quick service and table service restaurants, grocery stores and superstores, movie theaters, amusement parks, ice cream shops, takeout and delivery, vending machines, and even alcoholic beverages.

In the press release for the final rule, FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg stated, “making calorie information available on chain restaurant menus and vending machines is an important step for public health that will help consumers make informed choices for themselves and their families.”

Although the scientific evidence linking menu labeling to consumers’ purchasing behavior is weak, indirect effects may contribute more to incremental gains in public health. We highlight a few in the following blog post.

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Putting Humpty Dumpty Together Again: Consolidating Regulatory Authority Over Food Safety


February 23rd, 2015

The fragmented nature of regulatory authority over food in the United States is well known. More than a dozen federal agencies are responsible for the safety of the nation’s food supply. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Department of Agriculture (USDA) have the lion’s share of responsibility, together overseeing over 80 percent of the nation’s food safety.

Generally, the USDA regulates meat, and the FDA regulates everything else, but overlaps, exceptions, gaps, and therefore examples of resulting absurdities abound: the FDA regulates frozen pizza, unless it has pepperoni. The FDA regulates seafood, unless it’s catfish. The USDA has jurisdiction over packaged open-face meat sandwiches, but if the sandwiches are closed, authority shifts to the FDA.

This division in regulatory authority is neither planned nor rational. It is instead a historical accident, originating in the early twentieth century. When the Pure Food and Drug Act and Meat Inspection Act were passed on the same day in 1906, both targeting the adulteration of the food supply, their oversight was assigned to different departments within the USDA. The fissure widened when the FDA was moved out of the USDA in 1940. This divided regulatory framework is not the only reason for the fragmentation of regulatory authority over food in the US, but it is a main driver.

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Vaccinating Against Iron-Deficiency Anemia: A New Technology For Maternal And Child Health


February 19th, 2015

When we think of killer diseases of global health importance, iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) is not something that immediately comes to mind. Yet the December 2014 publication of leading causes of death by the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 reveals that IDA kills an estimated 183,400 people annually. To put this number in perspective, in the year 2013, IDA killed more people worldwide than ovarian cancer. In terms of years of life lost, IDA ranked higher than cervical cancer.

The fact that we compared IDA to two other well-known threats to the health of women is no accident. Because women of child-bearing age have low underlying iron reserves, they are at great risk of becoming deficient in iron and progressing to IDA. Pregnant women are especially vulnerable to IDA because of the high iron demands of the growing fetus. Growing children represent another important group who develop IDA.

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Oregon Bridges The Gap Between Health Care And Community-Based Health


February 12th, 2015

It is now commonly accepted that to achieve health, the U.S. health system must address the social determinants of health. While the integration of health care with social services and public health is happening relatively infrequently across the country, one bright spot can be found in Oregon, where an innovative Medicaid health system model, referred to as the coordinated care model, is showing early signs of success in bridging the gap between the community and the health care system.

Under Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber’s leadership, newly created coordinated care organizations (CCOs)—partnerships between physical, behavioral, and oral health providers—have over the past two years adopted Oregon’s coordinated care model, which was created as the foundation for Oregon’s health system reform efforts to ensure care is coordinated, performance is measured, positive outcomes are rewarded, and that there is a shared responsibility for health, sustainable rate of growth, and transparency in price and quality—all with the goal of promoting positive health outcomes.

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Request For Abstracts: Health Affairs Food And Health Theme Issue


February 4th, 2015

Health Affairs is planning a theme issue on food and health in November 2015. The issue will present work that explores the relationship between the food we consume and our wellbeing on the individual, societal, and global levels. Articles will address causes and consequences of dietary excess and insufficiency, analyze policies and programs aimed at influencing these, and explore the roles of public policy, industry, and stakeholder groups in the context of dietary behavior.

We invite all interested authors to submit abstracts for consideration for this issue.

The issue will consider the implications of global food production and distribution for the health of consumers and food workers, environmental quality, and food prices, among other things. It will also examine actions taken from the community level upward to address increasingly universal concerns about food-related illness. Several papers will provide broad overviews of key issues, but we are particularly interested in empirical analyses of specific policies, programs, and practices aimed at influencing dietary behavior and clarifying our thinking about food’s role in health.

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Exhibit Of The Month: California’s Hospital Fair Pricing Act Reduces Amount Paid By Uninsured


January 29th, 2015

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Monthseries. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month’s exhibit, published in the January issue of Health Affairs, looks at the proportion of hospital charges to and collections from uninsured patients in California from 2003 to 2012.

In the article, “California’s Hospital Fair Pricing Act Reduced The Prices Actually Paid By Uninsured Patients,” author Ge Bai of the Williams School of Commerce, Economics, and Politics at Washington and Lee University, examines how the Hospital Fair Pricing Act affects the net price paid by uninsured patients.

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Health Affairs Web First: Do Low-Income Consumers In Medicaid Opt-Out States Pay More Out Of Pocket?


January 28th, 2015

In the twenty-three states currently not expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), uninsured adults who would have been eligible for that program and have incomes at or above poverty are now generally eligible for subsidies to purchase health coverage in their state’s Marketplace exchange. How would out-of-pocket costs in the Marketplace compare with Medicaid coverage for this group of low-income Americans living in states not expanding Medicaid?

This study, being released by Health Affairs as a Web First, estimated these costs under two simulation scenarios: calculating out-of-pocket costs for families covered by a subsidized silver Marketplace plan and comparing that with coverage under Medicaid. Author Steven Hill found that Medicaid would more than halve these adults’ average annual family out-of-pocket spending ($938 versus $1,948).

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Moving Beyond Wellness ROI Toward Employment-Based Cultures Of Health: Part I


January 26th, 2015

With their recent post declaring that employment-based wellness initiatives “increase rather than decrease employer spending on health care with no net health benefit,” Al Lewis and coauthors are continuing to exert a clarifying presence in a field with a history of unsubstantiated claims and suspect methods. This conclusion is not supported by the work with which we and others have been associated and is thus not one with which we agree.

Nevertheless, Lewis et al. are to be acknowledged for fueling the need for a sharper focus on the core challenge at hand for employers: how best to improve the value of their health care investment—that is, how to manage health care costs while improving employee health and productivity—in ways that are sustainable. Incremental, inconsistent and, at times, maddeningly slow progress has been made. Employment-based wellness has been at the forefront, even as the need for quality improvement continues.

Moreover leading employers with well-developed management and measurement approaches have moved well beyond calculating the return on investment of individual wellness efforts and are demonstrating the more comprehensive value of building “cultures of health.”

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Additional Requirements For Charitable Hospitals: Final Rules On Community Health Needs Assessments And Financial Assistance


January 23rd, 2015

On December 29, the Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service released long-awaited final regulations implementing Affordable Care Act provisions that impose additional obligations on charitable hospital organizations covered by §501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.  Published in the Federal Register on December 31 2014, the regulations are massive, consolidating a series of prior proposals into a single final body of regulatory law.  The regulations affect more than 80 percent of U.S. hospitals, both the 60 percent that operate as private nonprofit entities and the 23 percent that operate as governmental units.

Because state and local governments typically condition their own sales, property, and corporate income tax exemptions for nonprofit entities to a hospital’s §501(c)(3) status, the final regulations carry broad and deep implications from both a policy and financial perspective.  According to the Congressional Budget Office the 2002 the national value of the federal tax exemption exceeded $12 billion, a figure that undoubtedly has risen considerably.

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CMS Spending Report Leads Health Affairs 2014 Top-Ten List


January 13th, 2015

A report on 2012 health spending by analysts at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Office of the Actuary was the most-read Health Affairs article in 2014. To celebrate the New Year, Health Affairs is making this piece and all the articles on the journal’s 2014 top-ten list freely available to all readers for two weeks.

Health Affairs publishes annual retrospective analyses of National Health Expenditures by the CMS analysts, as well as their health spending projections for the coming decade. In the latest installment in this series — which also made our 2014 top ten — the analysts reported on 2013 health spending and discussed their findings at a Washington DC briefing. The two reports documented continued slow growth in health spending; the 2013 report featured the slowest rate of health spending growth since CMS began tracking NHE in 1960.

Next on the 2014 Health Affairs most-read list was an article on PepsiCo’s workplace wellnesss program. John Caloyeras and coauthors at RAND and PepsiCo found that the diseases management component of the program saved money, but the lifestyle management component did not. This was followed by two Narrative Matters essays by Charlotte Yeh and Diane Meier; another Narrative Matters piece, by Janice Lynn Schuster, rounded out the list at number ten.

The full top-ten list is below. And check out the 2014 most-read Health Affairs Blog posts and GrantWatch Blog posts.

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The Importance Of Zip Code In Determining One’s Health Tops 2014 GrantWatch Blog Most-Read List


January 9th, 2015

Happy New Year! We have compiled a list of the ten most-read posts on GrantWatch Blog during 2014, in case you missed any of them.

  1. “Zip Code Overrides DNA Code When It Comes to a Healthy Community” (January 30, 2014). This post by Anne Warhover, former president and CEO of the Colorado Health Foundation, was by far the most-read post. She mentions the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Commission to Build a Healthier America, of which she was a commissioner, and relevant activities in Colorado. We also feel sure that Warhover’s post set a record for the number of re-tweets. Read more about Warhover here.
  2. “A World of Darkness: What If Thomas Edison Had to Write Grant Proposals to Invent the Light Bulb?” (February 18, 2014). This post by Jeffrey Brenner, executive director of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers and a family physician, came in at no. 2. Brenner is also a MacArthur Fellow. This post was published in partnership with Grantmakers In Health.
  3. “Elevating the Role of the Medical Assistant” (March 3, 2014). This post by Karen Wolk Feinstein, president and CEO of the Jewish Healthcare Foundation, in Pittsburgh, was the third most-read post in 2014. Feinstein is also president and CEO of its affiliated organization, the Pittsburgh Regional Health Initiative.
  4. “Foundations Supporting Stewardship of Health Care Resources through Medical Education and Training” (January 22, 2014). Daniel Wolfson and Leslie Tucker of the ABIM Foundation wrote this post about a convening of medical educators, students, residents, and other stakeholders. The ABIM Foundation and the Josiah Macy Jr Foundation held this meeting.
  5. “The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: Creating Partnerships to Build a Culture of Health” (September 11, 2014). David Colby, who just retired from the RWJF, wrote this popular post about the foundation’s new focus in its work. As Colby notes, “Health actually is a part of everything!”
  6. “Online ACA Marketplaces: the Value of Consumer Experience Assessments” (June 17, 2014). Marian Mulkey of the California HealthCare Foundation (CHCF) and Claudia Page, a consultant to the foundation, wrote this post about people signing up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Page is a former CHCF staffer.
  7. “The Hitachi Foundation Sheds Light on the New Role Frontline Workers Play in Health Care” (April 24, 2014). Tom Strong of the Hitachi Foundation wrote this post. Like no. 3, it mentions the role of medical assistants, which seems to be a popular subject!
  8. “Toxic Stress in Children and the Importance of Listening between the Lines to What Kids Say” (April 29, 2014). I wrote this post about Nadine Burke Harris’s speech at the Grantmakers In Health 2014 annual meeting in Atlanta.
  9. “If You Partner, They Might Just Come: One Foundation’s Effort to Disseminate Data on Quality of Care” (March 13, 2014). Andy Krackov, also of the CHCF, wrote this post about CalQualityCare.org, which it manages.
  10.  “The Rippel Foundation and the RWJF Push Frontiers for Financing and Sustaining Improvements in Health” (February 13, 2014). Laura Landy, who leads the Fannie E. Rippel Foundation, wrote this post about a “project to explore the conditions needed to build a next-generation health system.”

 

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The Value of Workplace Health Promotion (Wellness) Programs


December 22nd, 2014

The recent Health Affairs Blog post by Al Lewis, Vik Khanna, and Shana Montrose titled, “Workplace Wellness Produces No Savings” has triggered much interest and media attention. It highlights the controversy surrounding the value of workplace health promotion programs that 22 authors addressed in an article published in the September 2014 issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine titled, “Do Workplace Health Promotion (Wellness) Programs Work?”  That article also inspired several follow-up discussions and media reports, including one published by New York Times columnists Frakt and Carroll who answered the above question with: “usually not.”

There are certainly many points of contention and areas for continued discussion on this topic. It turns out that Lewis et al. and I agree on many things, and there are other areas where we see things differently.

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How To Succeed At Payment Reform (By Really Trying)


December 18th, 2014

Editor’s note: This is part 2 of a blog post adapted by the author from his recent keynote address at the New York State Health Foundation Conference, “Payment Reform: Expanding the Playing Field.” You can watch his half-hour speech, beginning around the eight-minute mark.

In my previous post, I explained “Why I Oppose Payment Reform.” Despite the reservations I laid out in that post, I do not actually oppose payment reform.

To summarize the case for payment reform, fee-for-service payment has supported a fragmented delivery system with little accountability for cost or quality.  As there is growing consensus that we want to move from our current system toward one that maximizes the health outcomes we achieve relative to the resources we expend, alternative payment models may provide us with a path. We should remember, however, that payment reform is a tool, not an end in itself; and we should be clear about our goals and then deploy the tool where it can help us achieve those goals.

Achieving payment reform is a process.  Here are five elements that are necessary for a successful process.

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Children’s Health: Health Affairs’ December Issue


December 8th, 2014

The December issue of Health Affairs includes a number of studies examining current threats to the health and health care of America’s children, and what can be done to meet their needs within an ever-evolving health care system. Some of the subjects covered: the role of Medicaid in reducing early-term elective deliveries; how pediatric services are covered in the state insurance Marketplaces; Medicaid spending on children with complex medical conditions; and the effect of abuse and neglect on children’s health and school engagement.

This issue of Health Affairs is supported by The W.K. Kellogg Foundation as well as by the Children’s Hospital Association, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Nemours, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, and The Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative.

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Health Affairs Event Reminder: Children’s Health


December 4th, 2014

Threats to children’s health have changed dramatically over the past few generations, but America’s health care system has been slow to transform to meet children’s evolving needs. The December 2014 thematic issue of Health Affairs examines the current state of children’s health, health care delivery, and coverage.

You are invited to join us on Monday, December 8, at a forum featuring authors from the new issue at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.  Panels will cover financing, delivery, access, and the social determinants of children’s health, and spotlight innovative programs that are making a difference.

WHEN: 
Monday, December 8, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE: 
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC, 13th Floor

REGISTER NOW!

Follow live tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_ChildHealth. 

See the full agenda. Among the confirmed speakers are:

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Collaborating On A Culture Of Health: Buncombe County, North Carolina


December 2nd, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing series written for Health Affairs Blog by local leaders from communities honored with the annual Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Prize. In 2014, six winning communities were selected by RWJF from more than 250 applicants and celebrated for placing a priority on health and creating powerful partnerships to drive change.

Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains, at the junction of the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers, Asheville, N.C. is graced with natural beauty and an abundance of health and economic resources. But in 2012, many residents of Asheville and the surrounding Buncombe County area were struggling with poverty and chronic illness. So the community responded as advocates, public health experts, community leaders, and business leaders came together to establish a culture of health.

As County Health Director Gibbie Harris explained, “the thing that is really driving us forward is an interest in being the healthiest community in the country… We have people who are interested in social justice, and a desire to improve the lives of our friends and neighbors.”

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Exhibit Of The Month: Maps Tell Powerful Stories About Children, Neighborhoods, And Possible Policy Solutions


November 25th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Month” series. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

Maps and health have been powerfully intertwined since nineteenth-century British physician John Snow produced a hand-drawn map that famously showed a correlation between the locations where cholera was killing hundreds of Londoners during an 1854 epidemic and the Broad Street pump where locals unknowingly drew water contaminated with the deadly bacterium.

Fast-forward to the twenty-first century, and maps that tell compelling stories about health, policy, and place are ubiquitous. If Snow were alive today, no doubt his stethoscope would be spinning.

The power and art of mapping, geospatial analysis, and health policy research are regularly featured in Health Affairs, but never before to the extent in the journal’s November issue. Four research papers give readers five maps that depict meaningful findings about children, low-income neighborhoods, and other local characteristics that affect health and offer valuable insights for policy makers.

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Workplace Wellness Produces No Savings


November 25th, 2014

During the last decade, workplace wellness programs have become commonplace in corporate America. The majority of US employers with 50 or more employees now offer the programs. A 2010 meta-analysis that was favorable to workplace wellness programs, published in Health Affairs, provided support for their uptake. This meta-analysis, plus a well-publicized “success” story from Safeway, coalesced into the so-called Safeway Amendment in the Affordable Care Act (ACA). That provision allows employers to tie a substantial and increasing share of employee insurance premiums to health status/behaviors, and subsidizes such program implementation by smaller employers. The assumption was that improved employee health would reduce the employer burden of health care costs.

Subsequently, however, Safeway’s story has been discredited. And the lead author of the 2010 meta-analysis, Harvard School of Public Health Professor Katherine Baicker, has cautioned on several occasions that more research is needed to draw any definitive conclusions. Now, more than four years into the ACA, we conclude that these programs increase, rather than decrease employer spending on health care with no net health benefit. The programs also cause overutilization of screening and check-ups in generally healthy working age adult populations, put undue stress on employees, and incentivize unhealthy forms of weight-loss.

Through a review of the research literature and primary sources, we have found that wellness programs produce a return-on-investment (ROI) of less than 1-to-1 savings to cost. This blog post will consider the results of two compelling study designs — population-based wellness-sensitive medical event analysis, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Then it will look at the popular, although weaker, participant vs. non-participant study design. (It is beyond the scope of this posting to question non-peer-reviewed vendor savings claims that do not use any recognized study design, though those claims are commonplace.)

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What Is The Future For Community Health Workers?


November 25th, 2014

I recently attended a symposium entitled “Community Health Workers: Getting the Job Done in Health Care Delivery.” (My concluding remarks begin at the 6:00:40 mark in the video.) Speakers examined the evolving role of Community Health Workers (CHWs) in the current era of delivery system reform. Health Affairs has published work documenting the importance of this part of the workforce, and our November issue is dedicated to the topic of “Collaborating for Community Health.”

I was asked to summarize some key points from the day-long conversation. In this post I highlight some of the themes covered.

Over the course of the day I heard the elements of two very different paths forward for community health workers. Each path was coherent and compelling, but they lead in very different directions.

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