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Archive for the 'Nonmedical Determinants' Category




Five Engagements That Will Define The Future Of Health


July 31st, 2014

I recently had the pleasure of opening and moderating the first day of the 2014 Colorado Health Symposium, which had as its theme “Transforming Health: The Power of Engagement.”  I found thinking about engagement, well, engaging, and in this post I summarize the keynote presentation I gave at the conference.

Engagement has many meanings, including some negative ones (such as “a hostile encounter between military forces”).  I focused on engagement as “emotional involvement or commitment” and described five engagements that will define the future of health.

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Washington Wakes Up To Socioeconomic Status


July 11th, 2014

John Mathewson, executive vice president of Health Care Services for Children with Special Needs (HSC) – a Medicaid managed care plan in D.C. for children on Supplemental Security Income (SSI) – recently spoke at the Association for Community Affiliated Plans (ACAP) CEO Summit before the July 4 Recess.

Mathewson described what he has dubbed The Kitten Paradox: When HSC examined environmental factors for children with asthma, it found that the presence of pets in the house was a common thread, not too far behind having a smoker around. Yet, it turns out the value a cat brings by protecting from mice or spawning a litter for sale outweighs any financial costs to the family associated with an ER visit, which are often free or carry a low copayment. Thus the paradox.

An awardee at the conference, Hennepin Health, catalogued the evidence showing that reliable housing can improve health outcomes, including improving mental health and lowering emergency room and inpatient hospital utilization.

The focus of these sessions was the social determinants of health, and a lot of these safety net health plan leaders’ heads were nodding throughout. The plans, which disproportionately serve Medicaid enrollees and thus ‘dual eligible’ seniors in Medicare, know something about the importance of social determinants that the health policy community – at least in Washington – is only now slowly waking up to.

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Investing In The Social Safety Net: Health Care’s Next Frontier


July 7th, 2014

Editor’s note: In addition to Jennifer DeCubellis, Leon Evans also coauthored this post. 

The United States spends 250 percent more than any other developed country on health care services, yet we are ranked below 16 other countries in overall life expectancy. A less frequently discussed statistic, however, is the degree to which the U.S. under-invests in social services: for every dollar spent on health care, only 50 cents is invested in social services. In comparison, other developed countries spend roughly $2 on social services for every dollar spent on health care. The U.S. is 10th among developed countries in its combined investment in health care and social services.

This imbalance has ramifications for the nation’s Medicaid program, where just five percent of beneficiaries with complex health and social problems drive more than 50 percent of all program costs. Many individuals in this high-cost group have chronic complex medical, behavioral health, and/or supportive service needs, and in the absence of coordinated intervention, they tend to be frequent visitors to emergency rooms and have high rates of avoidable hospital admissions.

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Happy Birthday HCPF


July 1st, 2014

Today marks the 20th birthday of the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing.  The story of its creation provides an important reminder of how our thinking about health care has evolved over the past few decades – and how it continues to evolve today.

Back in the bad old days, Medicaid was just another social service.  Housed within a broader social services agency, Colorado Medicaid – as was the case in most states – grew up with a typical welfare mentality.  Program enrollees were beneficiaries.  If they did not enroll, we assumed it meant they did not need or want our services.  Eligibility was a cumbersome, rule-bound process with inscrutable results and unintelligible notices to applicants of what was missing from their file.

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The 2014 Culture of Health Prizes


June 25th, 2014

Today the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation awarded its 2014 Culture of Health Prize to six communities. These communities —  Brownsville, TexasBuncombe County, North CarolinaDurham County, North CarolinaSpokane County, WashingtonTaos Pueblo, New Mexico; and Williamson, West Virginia – were selected for the work they have done to place a high priority on health and bring partners together to drive local change.

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Health Affairs June Issue: Where Can We Find Savings In Health Care?


June 2nd, 2014

The June issue of Health Affairs, released today, features various approaches to cost-savings in the U.S. health care system. A variety of articles analyze the effects of potential policy solutions on the Medicare and Medicaid programs and their impact on the health of beneficiaries and tax payer wallets.

Federal approaches to reduce obesity and Type 2 diabetes rates by improving nutrition could work—but the how matters. Sanjay Basu of the Stanford University School of Medicine and coauthors modeled the effects of two policy approaches to reforming the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), which serves one in seven Americans. They found that ending a subsidy for sugar-sweetened beverage purchases with SNAP dollars would result in a decrease in obesity of 281,000 adults and 141,000 children, through a 15.4 percent reduction in calories by the lowering of purchases of this source. They also found that a $0.30 credit back on every dollar spent on qualifying fruits and vegetables could more than double the number of SNAP participants who meet federal guidelines for fruit and vegetable consumption.

With more than forty-six million people receiving SNAP food stamp benefits, the authors suggest that policy makers closely examine the implications of such proposals at the population level to determine which will benefit people’s health the most and prove most cost-effective.

If you’re between ages 15–39 when you are diagnosed with cancer, the implications later in life extend well beyond your health. Gery P. Guy Jr. of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and coauthors examined Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data and determined that survivors of adolescent and young adult cancers had annual per person medical expenditures of $7,417, compared to $4,247 for adults without a cancer history. They also found an annual per capita lost productivity of $4,564 per cancer survivor — because of employment disability, missed workdays, and an increased number of additional days spent in bed as a result of poor health — compared to $2,314 for adults without a cancer history.

The authors suggest that the disparities are associated with ongoing medical care needs and employment challenges connected to cancer survivorship, and that having health insurance alone is not enough to close the gap. They stress the importance of access to lifelong follow-up care and education to help lessen the economic burden of this important population of cancer survivors.

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Health Policy Research And Disparities: A Health Affairs Conversation With Lisa Simpson And Darrell Gaskin


May 22nd, 2014

Earlier this year, AcademyHealth held its 2014 National Health Policy Conference; Health Affairs was a media partner for the NHPC. In a new installment of our Health Affairs Conversations Podcast series, we talk about the conference, as well as the challenges and opportunities facing the health services and health policy research communities, with AcademyHealth president and CEO Lisa Simpson. Before taking the helm of AcademyHealth, Dr. Simpson was director of the Child Policy Research Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and professor of pediatrics in the Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati. She served as the Deputy Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality from 1996 to 2002.

We also take a close look at one of the NHPC sessions: “Community Health and Disparity: Moving Beyond Description.” (The disparities session is freely available to all readers.) Darrel Gaskin, who led the panel discussion, joins us as well. He is Deputy Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions and Vice Chair of AcademyHealth’s Board of Directors

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Beyond Access: High Quality Care For All


April 30th, 2014

In medical school, I had an epiphany about my role as a doctor during my obstetrics-gynecology rotation at the county safety-net hospital in Fresno, California. I loved the thrill and satisfaction of delivering babies, but after about 10 births, it hit me that virtually all the women for whom I had delivered babies were teenage girls, as young as 13. They and their children would face uphill battles. As a clinician, I was too often a cog in a machine, fixing immediate needs but not addressing underlying problems to prevent poor health outcomes.

The Affordable Care Act tears down a fundamental barrier preventing vulnerable populations from accessing care by reducing the number of uninsured and underinsured Americans. But expanded access to coverage will not, by itself, guarantee high quality care for all. It would be a serious mistake to assume that insurance will eliminate disparities in health outcomes. In Chicago, a person with diabetes living in an African American neighborhood is five times more likely to have his or her leg amputated than a person living in a white neighborhood. Insurance alone won’t close that gap. Indeed, many who needlessly lose limbs are already insured.

I have spent a great deal of my career caring for inner city patients and working with other professionals to research the health of the public. If we really want to end disparities in the health care system, here are some things we should be doing:

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The Subsidy Cliff: Incentives For Increasing Projected Income To Qualify For Exchange Subsidies


April 29th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is also coauthored by Jacob Wallace.

During the first round of open enrollment under the ACA, millions of Americans learned whether they qualify for subsidized health insurance coverage through the law’s exchanges. At that time, one significant feature of the law became especially apparent: the dramatic cutoff of premium assistance for individuals who do not qualify for Medicaid in their state, but also earn too little to qualify for subsidies through the exchanges.

For example, if, during enrollment, a sixty year-old Miami man projected that he would earn $11,500 in 2014, he could purchase a bronze plan using a full subsidy so there would be no cost to him in premiums.  But if the same man projected earning just $500 less, $11,000, he would no longer qualify for any subsidy at all and the same coverage would require him to pay the full $6,573 premium.

Here is how the coverage gap works: Under the ACA, people earning below the key threshold of 100 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) do not qualify for any premium subsidies through the exchanges; the law was written to provide them with Medicaid coverage instead. In reality, however, Florida and 23 other states chose not to expand Medicaid under the ACA, creating a gap into which roughly five million people with annual incomes less than 100 percent FPL ($11,490 for an individual or $23,550 for a family of four) will likely fall.

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(Only) Evidence-Based After-Hospital Care: Where Should the Savings Go?


April 24th, 2014

Medicare 2014 has achieved the main goal of Medicare 1965: Access to medical treatment for older Americans. That, and advances in medicine, public health, and technology, have led to long lives and better health. Nevertheless, the system designed for the priorities of 1965 does not match the needs of 2014, and beyond.

What very old and frail people need — whether to ease the fears of a 90 year old woman living alone in a second-floor walk-up apartment or the burdens on the family of an 85- year old slowly drifting into the haze of dementia — goes without Medicare coverage. Addressing those needs and correcting course to change habits of overtreatment and cost inflation for older people living with multiple chronic conditions is a historic opportunity — to build Medicare 2030.

With what we know today, we could actually right-size the medical services, generate the savings, and re-design the delivery system to ensure reliability and supportive services. And more: we could pay for all or most of that vastly improved system with the savings we achieve from optimizing medical care.

But will the nation pursue that reinvestment? Will policymakers insist upon it? Will the public demand it? To do so would mean major changes in how we operate health care.

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Connected Health Opportunities For Medicaid’s Most Vulnerable Patients


April 22nd, 2014

The February issue of Health Affairs features a series of articles on connected health and highlights the potential for telehealth and telemedicine to reshape how health care is delivered, consumed, tracked, and even paid for.

With funding support from Kaiser Permanente Community Benefit, the Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS) recently conducted a series of focus groups that showed how one key Medicaid population — medically and socially complex, low-income individuals — stands to gain from these advances.

The four focus groups were designed to better understand the issues driving these individuals’ health care utilization, their current level of comfort with technology, and how technology might be able to help them better manage their challenges. Participants were actively receiving services from of one of four case management/care coordination programs in New York City, Long Island, the Hudson Valley, and Philadelphia, and all were Medicaid beneficiaries with multiple medical and/or behavioral health conditions.

According to a recent Health Affairs article by John Billings and Maria Raven, these individuals frequent emergency departments and have a high incidence of chronic disease. They typically have chaotic, unstable, and socially isolated lives, and many lack permanent housing, live on the street, or in homeless shelters.

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Origins In Oregon: The Alternative Payment Methodology Project


April 14th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a periodic Health Affairs Blog series, which will run over the next year, looking at payment and delivery reforms in Arkansas and Oregon. The posts will be based on evaluations of these reforms performed with the support of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The authors of this post are part of the team evaluating the Oregon model.

How the country pays for health care is currently at odds with its vision of how health care should be delivered. Traditional fee-for-service health care payments are linked to the volume of visits, rather than the quality of patient-centered care.

To unlink payment from the volume of services provided and begin aligning it with value, Oregon recently launched the Alternative Payment Methodology (APM) demonstration project, where participating community health centers (CHCs)—aka federally qualified health centers—no longer earn revenue based on the number of individual patient seen. Instead, community health centers will receive a monthly payment based on the size and composition of their patient population, shifting the paradigm from the number of doctor visits to the provision of high-quality, team-based, patient-centered care.

APM is being piloted at three Oregon Community Health Centers: Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center, Mosaic Medical, and OHSU Family Medicine at Richmond. The clinics are receiving technical assistance from the Oregon Primary Care Association (OPCA) and other community, regional and national partners.

With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a team of researchers from Oregon Health and Science University and OCHIN, one of the nation’s largest health information networks, is investigating the impact of APM on the delivery of primary care in safety-net populations. In addition to regular posts like this one, the research team will also share lessons learned and perspectives from key stakeholders on Frontiers of Health Care.

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Health Reform And Criminal Justice: Advancing New Opportunities


April 1st, 2014

Community Oriented Correctional Health Services (COCHS) and Health Affairs invite you to join thought leaders from public safety, health care, philanthropy, and all levels of government to further explore the intersection of health reform and criminal justice. As implementation of the Affordable Care Act continues, it is time to take stock of how far we have come in addressing the needs of the jail population through policy and planning, and to set our direction for the future.

This national event will take place on Thursday, April 3, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., at the Columbus Club in Union Station, Washington, D.C. It is being organized with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Jacob & Valeria Langeloth Foundation, and Public Welfare Foundation. Registration for in-person attendance is closed, but a live webcast is available.

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Mental Illness In America’s Jails And Prisons: Toward A Public Safety/Public Health Model


April 1st, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is published in conjunction with the March issue of Health Affairs, which features a cluster of articles on jails and health. 

Mental Illness in America’s Jails and Prisons

The United States continues to have one of the highest incarceration rates in the world, with 5 percent of the world population, but nearly 25 percent of the world’s prisoners.  Inmates are spending more time behind bars as states adopt “truth in sentencing laws,” which requires inmates to serve 85 percent of their sentence behind bars.

In 2012, about 1 in every 35 adults in the United States, or 2.9 percent of adult residents, was on probation or parole or incarcerated in prison or jail, the same rate observed in 1997.  If recent incarceration rates remain unchanged, an estimated 1 out of every 20 persons will spend time behind bars during their lifetime; and many of those caught in the net that is cast to catch the criminal offender will be suffering with mental illness.

Nearly a decade ago, I wrote an article with Patrick Brown titled “Crisis in Corrections: The Mentally Ill in America’s Prisons.”  It was about the alarming growth in the number of mentally ill individuals behind bars.  Since then, it has been shown that about 20 percent of prison inmates have a serious mental illness, 30 to 60 percent have substance abuse problems and, when including broad-based mental illnesses, the percentages increase significantly. For example, 50 percent of males and 75 percent of female inmates in state prisons, and 75 percent of females and 63 percent of male inmates in jails, will experience a mental health problem requiring mental health services in any given year.

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Embarking On A New Journey With Health Affairs


March 31st, 2014

I am delighted to be taking on the role of editor-in-chief of Health Affairs. This is a dynamic time in all aspects of health and health care: insurance coverage expansions, delivery system changes, and growing attention to population health.  Building upon thirty-three years of peer-reviewed scholarship, Health Affairs will continue to serve as the nation’s primary resource for the health policy community.

My goals for Health Affairs coalesce around a single theme: broadening the reach of the journal.

Health Affairs is strong in the core health policy community, but our scholarship is relevant to myriad actors in the one-sixth of the United States economy represented by health care.  My goal is to broaden our engagement with the worlds of law, finance, design, and many others.

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A March Madness Health Wonk Review


March 27th, 2014

Welcome to the “March Madness” edition of the Health Wonk Review. The NCAA college basketball tournament seemed like a natural theme for a health care policy blog post: huge amounts of money floating around in ways that only sometimes correlate with performance, and head-to-head match-ups that can yield results no one expected (though in the tournament those unexpected results produce quicker and more certain changes than is often the case in health care).

We considered illustrating each blog post with pictures of a college basketball team from the author’s home state celebrating a championship, but we thought better of that after seeing this cautionary tale. So let’s get to the great collection of posts from our Wonkers.

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HA Web First: New Medicaid Recipients Healthier Than Pre-ACA Enrollees


March 26th, 2014

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) gives states the option of expanding Medicaid coverage to individuals and families with incomes of up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. A new study, being released today as a Web First by Health Affairs, used simulation methods to compare nondisabled adults enrolled in Medicaid before the ACA with newly eligible adults and those previously eligible but not enrolled in the program.

According to the study’s analysis, both the newly eligible and those not previously enrolled were healthier than the pre-ACA Medicaid enrollees. Authors Steven Hill, Salam Abdus, Julie Hudson, and Thomas Selden found that the pattern of results was similar for physical and mental health. They also determined that in states not expanding Medicaid under the ACA, adults in the income range for the law’s Medicaid expansion were healthier than pre-ACA enrollees.

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Health Information Exchange In NYC Jails: Early Policy Challenges


March 20th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is published in conjunction with the March issue of Health Affairs, which features a cluster of articles on jails and health. For more on jails and health information technology in particular, see here, here, and here.

New York City has the second largest jail system in the United States, with an average daily census of approximately 12,000 and 80,000 annual admissions. It is well documented that the population that cycles in and out of US jails each year is statistically sicker than the general population and therefore would benefit from greater care coordination between correctional and community settings. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Bureau of Correctional Health Services (CHS) is responsible for the care delivered in all 12 NYC jail facilities. The mission of CHS is to provide a community standard of care based on three core frameworks; patient safety, population health and human rights.

As part of this mission, CHS implemented a full electronic health record (EHR) system starting in 2008, completing the implementation of the final facility in 2011. One of the most promising features of EHRs is the ability to share information electronically to facilitate care coordination, referred to as Health Information Exchange (HIE).  Preliminary research of the use of HIE in community based settings is encouraging, with the use of HIE in the Emergency Department resulting in 30 percent fewer admissions and use in ambulatory settings resulting in 56 percent fewer readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge. (Results pending review; presented 11/14/13 at NYeC Digital Health Conference by Center for Healthcare Informatics and Policy (CHiP).) In the hopes of realizing the full benefits of its EHR system, CHS recently launched an HIE pilot in its women’s facility.

The goals of integrating HIE into jail-based health care are to inform the care patients receive while incarcerated and to coordinate care upon release.  Currently, CHS has access to two external sources of information: BHIX, a Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO) that recently merged with Healthix and now includes patient data from some major hospital systems and community providers in parts of Brooklyn, Queens and Long Island; and PSYCKES, a Medicaid claims-based data warehouse that includes claims information (both medical and mental health) on patients who have had a substance abuse or mental health diagnosis and/or substance abuse or mental health treatment within the last five years.

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The New Nutrition Facts Panel: Public Health Improvement Or Distraction?


March 19th, 2014

Last month, the United States Food and Drug Administration announced long awaited proposed changes to the Nutrition Facts Panel (NFP), the nutrition information found on the back of packaged foods and beverages. The NFP is required to be on all packaged foods, with significant regulations on what is presented and how the information can be presented. Initially mandated in the first Bush Administration, the NFP offers a clear and consistent manner of presenting nutrition information—at least for those with the time and nutrition knowledge to benefit from the information.

The key questions behind the proposed changes are: will they be successful in altering consumer behavior, how might they be improved, and what overall role might they play in obesity prevention?

The NFP is clearly a source from which those already motivated and knowledgeable can easily access information and a base on which to build future approaches to addressing obesity. Put differently, this information will only work if people actively, directly choose to turn the package over, engage in information, and push past the many impulses pulling them towards the less healthy foods. The compelling nature of unhealthy foods means that individuals have to be particularly motivated, or the nutrition information has to be particularly compelling.

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Neighborhood Grocery Stores Combat Obesity, Improve Food Perceptions


March 12th, 2014

The Cummins et al article “New Neighborhood Grocery Store Increased Awareness of Food Access but Did Not Alter Dietary Habits or Obesity,” published in the February issue of Health Affairs, generated considerable media attention, with headlines claiming that grocery stores do not contribute to healthy diets or reductions in obesity.  However, the study offered no conclusive proof showing that access to grocery stores is not a part of the solution to preventing obesity.  In fact, the study showed clear signs of promise that the intervention was working in key aspects during the short time the researchers collected data.  Within just a few months after the new supermarket opened, for example, researchers documented significant improvement in residents’ perceptions about the choice and quality of fresh fruits and vegetables, along with improvements in their perception of healthy food accessibility.

The subject of the study, the Fresh Grocer in North Philadelphia, is a beautiful store with a bountiful fresh produce section. The supermarket, which is now thriving in one of the poorest neighborhoods in the country, was built from the ground up after a 15-year hiatus in which the surrounding community had no grocery store. Its opening has revitalized a historic African-American owned shopping plaza and reinvigorated the local neighborhood’s retail economy.

Has the store reduced the rate of obesity among local residents? This is a crucial question, but one that cannot be adequately deduced from the present study. All we know from this study’s findings is that obesity rates did not change significantly during the first six to nine months after the store’s opening – not surprising, given the many decades of gradual changes in eating habits that have led to the obesity epidemic.

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