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Four Years Into A Commercial ACO For CalPERS: Substantial Savings And Lessons Learned


April 17th, 2014
 
by Glenn Melnick and Lois Green

Editor’s note: In addition to Glenn Melnick, this post is coauthored by Lois Green.

Background: In a very short period of time, Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) have become an important and widespread part of the US health care landscape. A recent Health Affairs Blog post estimates the total number of public (Medicare) and private ACOs at more than 600 nationally, covering more than 18 million insured population. Despite their rapid and widespread adoption, relatively little is known about how ACOs actually work and how successful they have been. This is due in part to their relative “newness,” as many reported ACOs are just getting up and running. Others have been operational for short periods of time and have yet to produce meaningful or long-term sustainable results.

This Health Affairs Blog post helps fill some of this void by reporting on the operational experiences of one of the oldest (4+ years) and largest commercial ACOs in the nation. A previous Health Affairs Blog post reported on its initial planning and start-up phase, and a subsequent Health Affairs article reported on its early financial results.

In 2007, Blue Shield of California, along with provider and employer partner organizations, began exploring development of one of the first ACO-like programs in the country to serve Commercial patients. It launched in 2010 and, as reported below, has been generating savings to consumers throughout the period. Located in the competitive Sacramento market of northern California, the ACO is an example of an innovative shared savings model involving a large insurer—Blue Shield of California; a purchaser—the California Public Employees Retirement System (CalPERS); a physician group—Hill Physicians Medical Group (HPMG); and a hospital system—Dignity Health. The population served approximately 42,000 CalPERS employees and their families covered by Blue Shield.

In this Health Affairs Blog interview, senior executives from each of the partnership organizations, all of whom have operational responsibilities and oversight of this ground-breaking Commercial ACO, discuss key operational aspects of the ACO and its implementation. They discuss evolution of the culture, governance and essential “partnership” relationships an ACO requires to survive and thrive. In addition, they detail specific operational initiatives designed to coordinate and manage care, and report on how these initiatives have fared over the four-year period since the ACO’s launch. Empirical results show success in many areas, with challenges in some others. Of particular note has been overall cost of health care (COHC) savings reported at gross savings of more than $105 million, with net savings of $95 million to CalPERS members, since 2010. Finally, the partners illuminate the ACO’s future directions and offer lessons for other organizations considering development of an ACO delivery system for the Commercial market.

The interview was supported by funding from the California HealthCare Foundation.

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We’ll Need A Bigger Boat: Reimagining The Hospital-Physician Partnership


April 17th, 2014
 
by Francis J. Crosson and John Combes

Editor’s note: In addition to Francis J. Crosson, this post is coauthored by John Combes.

Change is underway in the delivery and financing of American health care, and it is manifested in the evolving relationship of hospitals and physicians across the U.S. These developments are most striking in California, but are appearing in various forms in almost all states. Physicians and hospitals are being both “pushed” and “pulled” together in new ways by a variety of market forces, including the development of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) for both Medicare and commercially insured patients, increased direct employment of physicians by hospitals, the emergence of new payment mechanisms such as global payments, and, in general, by the need for physicians, physician groups and hospitals to deliver greater “value.”

All of this presents the opportunity to redesign care to be more coordinated, efficient, patient-driven, and effective. These integration forces could lead to the kind of organizations envisioned 15 years ago in the Institute of Medicine report “Crossing the Quality Chasm”, resulting in the Triple Aim of better health, better patient care experiences and outcomes, and improved affordability — driven, in part, by new patient care models and payment methods including incentives for improving the value of health care services.

Many physicians are uncomfortable with the idea of physician-hospital integration for several reasons. The long tradition of “professional autonomy”– perhaps best described as “the need for physicians to be able to make appropriate and scientifically based patient-by-patient decisions in the best interest of those patients” — can raise fears among some physicians about becoming part of a larger practice or institution and losing that autonomy. Additionally, some physician groups have shown that they can develop a successful ACO without the need for hospital and insurance partners, preferring to manage the clinical and financial risk alone.

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Payment and Delivery Reform Case Study: Congestive Heart Failure


April 15th, 2014
by Darshak Sanghavi

Editor’s note: In addition to Darshak Sanghavi (photo and bio above), this post is coauthored by Meaghan George, a project manager at the Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform at the Brookings Institution. The post is adapted from a full-length case study, the first in a series of case studies made possible through the Engelberg Center’s Merkin Initiative on Physician Payment Reform and Clinical Leadership, a special project to develop clinician leadership of health care delivery, payment and financing reform. The case studies will be presented using a “MEDTalk” format featuring live story-telling and knowledge-sharing from patients, providers, and policymakers. The event series will kickoff on Wednesday, April 16 from 10 a.m. – Noon EST.

Introduction

Clinicians and hospitals across the nation struggle with providing and paying for optimal care for their congestive health failure (CHF) patients. However, there are opportunities to make care better. In fact, of the more than 10,000 pages in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) implementing regulations, the least talked about are the dozens of small experiments led by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) that test new ways to pay for medical services.

We use a case study approach to investigate and tell the story of what two academic medical centers, Duke University Health System (“Duke”) and University of Colorado Hospital (“Colorado”), are doing to innovate and improve CHF care while implementing alternative payment models offered by CMMI.

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Look At Consequences Of Rejecting Medicaid Expansion Leads First Quarter Health Affairs Blog Most-Read List


April 14th, 2014
by Tracy Gnadinger

Given their recent mention in Paul Krugman’s New York Times‘ column, it’s not surprising that Sam Dickman, David Himmelstein, Danny McCormick, and Steffie Woolhandler‘s discussion of the health and financial impacts of opting out of Medicaid expansion was the most-read Health Affairs Blog post from January 1 to March 31, 2014.

Next on the list was Robert York, Kenneth Kaufman, and Mark Grube‘s discussion of a regional study on the transformation from inpatient-centered care to an outpatient model focused on community-based care. This was followed by Susan Devore‘s commentary on changing health care trends and David Muhlestein‘s evaluation of accountable care organization growth.

Tim Jost is also listed four times for contributions to his Implementing Health Reform series on Medicaid asset rules, CMS letter to issuers, contraceptive coverage, and exchange and insurance market standards.

The full list appears below.

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The Role Of Remote Care Management In Population Health


April 4th, 2014
by Alan Snell

Editor’s note: For more on this topic, see the February issue of Health Affairs, which features a series of articles on connected health. 

Remote care management (RCM) programs use telehealth technology to facilitate clinically driven, remote monitoring, care, and education of patients and are an absolute necessity for providers and payers striving to implement an effective population health management strategy. Historically, RCM programs have been viewed through a fee-for-service lens and, as a consequence, overlooked, because physicians would not be reimbursed for the time to monitor these patients outside the confines of their offices.

Yet the current shift to value-based care presents an imperative for health care providers to avoid costs by better managing the health of people with chronic conditions. This change will require more hands-on, effective support for patients that result in lasting behavior change.

Providers are working to keep the health of an individual from rapidly deteriorating once they develop a chronic condition(s). Two prominent barriers to providers’ efforts to keep their patients healthy are the providers’ intermittent contact with patients and limited access to clinical data. Remote care management addresses these barriers.

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Responding To ‘The Hidden Curriculum’: Don’t Forget About The Patient


April 3rd, 2014
by Rob Lott

Narrative Matters readers might remember Joshua Liao’s moving essay about the dangers of the Hidden Curriculum. Liao, a resident physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, wrote about the consequences of making a serious mistake as a medical student on an obstetrics rotation. He read the essay for the Narrative Matters podcast and it’s a great listen.

Liao’s essay, penned with Eric Thomas and Sigall Bell, also generated some compelling responses. It inspired Tim Lahey to write about his experience leading the curriculum redesign at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine. And when the Washington Post ran an excerpt of Liao’s essay last week, it led Franca Posner to remind readers about “one missing piece of this puzzle”: the patient’s perspective.

Posner was once in a similar situation, but it was she on the hospital bed: “I was that woman 20 years ago, only I was almost 40 and had a 5-year-old child and five miscarriages in my reproductive history,” Posner wrote in a letter to the editor published in the Post’s Health and Science section on March 31.

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Should Provider Performance Measures Be Risk-Adjusted For Sociodemographic Factors?


March 27th, 2014
by Christine Cassel

The National Quality Forum released draft recommendations on March 18 to change the way we assess the care that doctors and hospitals provide, and they are sure to cause a buzz in and beyond the health care community. That’s a good thing, because reflection and conversation are vital pieces of ‘getting it right’ when determining how measures can be used to gauge healthcare performance.

The recommendations come from a panel of 26 national experts convened by NQF at the request of the federal government. The question before them: Should the measures we use to assess providers’ performance be risk-adjusted to account for patients who are poor, homeless, illiterate, uneducated, or have other indicators of lower socioeconomic status? The panel’s recommendations are discussed below, and we encourage you to register your views by commenting on the report by April 16 and on this post.

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The Health Workforce: A Critical Component Of The Health Care Infrastructure


March 24th, 2014
by Edward Salsberg

Editor’s note: This is the first in a periodic series of Health Affairs Blog posts on health workforce issues by Edward Salsberg. Mr. Salsberg has spent over 30 years studying the health workforce, including nearly 20 years establishing and directing three centers dedicated to workforce data collection, analysis and research. The first center, at the University at Albany, was focused on state health workforce data collection and issues. The second, at the Association of American Medical Colleges, was focused on the physician workforce across the nation. The third, the National Center for Health Workforce Analysis, was authorized by the Affordable Care Act. Mr. Salsberg has now joined the faculty at George Washington University where they are establishing a new Center for Health Workforce Research and Policy.

In the post below, Mr. Salsberg provides an overview of workforce issues. Future posts will discuss more specific health workforce questions and developments.

It could be argued that the health workforce — the people who provide direct patient care, as well as the staff that support caregivers and health care institutions — is the most significant component of the infrastructure of the health care system. Yet as a nation we have invested very little in collecting and analyzing health workforce data or in supporting the necessary research to inform effective public and private decision making. The results of this lack of investment are surpluses and shortages, significant mal-distribution, and less efficient and effective care than would be possible with better intelligence on our workforce needs.

For many health care professions, it takes years to build education and training capacity to increase, supply, or to change curriculum and modify the profession’s skill set. For these professions, we need to not only assess today’s needs but to project our future needs.

What the nation needs is a system to provide data, research findings, and information to thousands of individual stakeholders. This includes individuals considering a health career; colleges, universities and training programs that will educate and prepare them; the health organizations who will employ them; policy makers who need to decide what, if any, programs and policies to support; and the private sector that needs to decide whether to invest in workforce development. The responsibility for assuring an adequate supply and a well prepared health workforce is shared between the public and private sectors at both the national and the state and local level. Regardless of who is making the decisions related to health professions education and training capacity and health professions preparation, accurate and timely data is extremely important to support informed decisions.

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Three Better Bipartisan Health Policies To Pay For Repealing Medicare’s SGR


March 21st, 2014
by Robert Moffit

After months of House and Senate negotiations on legislation to replace the Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula for updating Medicare physician payment, members of Congress are relieved to finally have an agreement. It is perfectly understandable that they, as well as professional medical organizations, want to act quickly. The danger is that even normally staid and stern budget hawks are prepared to move quickly to get this unworkable payment system permanently off the national agenda.

Of course, the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) should be repealed and replaced. Congressional leaders point out that since 2003, the routine cycle of emergency “doc fixes” have cost taxpayers $150 billion. The compromise legislation, which is barely better than the deplorable status quo, falls far short of what should be done.  In fact, the House bill (H.R. 4015), which passed the House of Representatives on March 14, and the Senate bill (S. 2000), which was reported out of the Finance Committee, would worsen the nation’s deficits.

It is not only critical for lawmakers to responsibly finance the $138 billion in new spending over the next 10 years that eliminating and replacing SGR will incur, but also do so without creating future budget deficits.

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Nine Questions About My New Medical Home


March 17th, 2014
by Matthew Anderson

Sometime in the past five years — it’s hard for me to say exactly when — I suddenly found myself living in a new home. I must admit I am still a bit disoriented by how this happened. But it did. People keep telling me that everything will be ok but I am not entirely sure.

For example, in my old home we had occasional family meetings; things are different now. We now have weekly (and monthly) meetings. The many new administrators ask us to complete personality surveys. Once we had to figure out what items we should take from a sinking yacht in the South Pacific (hint: the $100 bill will be useful). Another time we had to decide if we were a “Wow” or a “Thinker.” We are asked to figure out how we can do a better job for them. I guess, like all forms of therapy you don’t get better unless you change.

Despite all these meetings there are a series of things I still don’t understand. I am afraid to raise my hand at the meetings and give the impression I’m a bad sport so I have written my questions down. Please, please don’t think I am a Luddite who wants to go back to the old home. In fact, what I dislike most about the new home is precisely the way — even in its differences — it resembles the old home.

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Physicians’ Concerns About Electronic Health Records: Implications And Steps Towards Solutions


March 11th, 2014

Policy makers and professional organizations have become increasingly concerned about physician professional satisfaction. As in the managed care expansion of the 1990s, recent health reforms, including but not limited to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), have begun to have effects “in the exam room,” changing how patients, physicians, and allied health professionals interact. To better understand how these reforms are affecting patient care and other aspects of physicians’ professional lives, we recently conducted an in-depth study of professional satisfaction using a combination of open-ended interviews and written surveys with physicians and other professionals in 30 practices (encompassing 55 distinct practice sites) across the United States.

We found several factors that enhanced physician professional satisfaction in 2013, including:
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  • perceived ability to deliver high-quality patient care
  • reasonable control over the environment, pace, and content of work
  • sharing clinical values with organizational leadership
  • respectful professional relationships
  • incomes perceived as predictable and fair

Intense Physician Reaction To Electronic Health Records

At the time of our study, the ACA did not yet seem to have measurable effects on physician professional satisfaction, either positive or negative. Instead, regulations stemming from the ARRA—specifically, incentives and penalties to adopt electronic health records (EHRs)—have provoked widespread and intense responses from practicing physicians. Despite recognizing the value of EHRs in concept, many physicians are struggling to use their EHRs, which they describe as negatively impacting patient care in several important ways and undermining their professional satisfaction.

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The Dangers Of Quality Improvement Overload: Insights From The Field


March 7th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is also co-authored by Ksenia O Gorbenko, Catherine van de Ruit, and Charles Bosk of the University of Pennsylvania.

Quality improvement (QI) and patient safety initiatives are created with the laudable goal of saving lives and reducing “preventable harms” to patients. As the number of QI interventions continues to rise, and as hospitals become increasingly subject to financial pressures and penalties for hospital-acquired conditions (HACs), we believe it is important to consider the impact of the pressure to improve everything at once on hospitals and their staff.

We argue that a strategy that capitalizes on “small wins” is most effective. This approach allows for the creation of steady momentum by first convincing workers they can improve, and then picking some easily obtainable objectives to provide evidence of improvement.

National Quality Improvement Initiatives

Our qualitative team is participating in two large ongoing national quality improvement initiatives, funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Each initiative targets a single HAC and its reduction in participating hospitals. We have visited hospital sites across six states in order to understand why QI initiatives achieve their goals in some settings but not others. To date, we have conducted over 150 interviews with hospital workers ranging from frontline staff in operating rooms and intensive care units to hospital administrators and executive leadership. In interviews for this ethnographic research, one of our interviewees warned us about unrealistic expectations for change, “you cannot go from imperfect to perfect. It’s a slow process.”

While there is much to learn about how to achieve sustainable QI in the environment of patient care, one thing is certain from the growing wisdom of ethnographic studies of QI: buy-in from frontline providers is essential for creating meaningful change. Front-line providers often bristle at expectations from those they believe have little understanding of the demands of their daily work. Requiring health care providers to improve on all mandated measures at once—in an atmosphere of reduced reimbursements and frequent staff shortages—is a goal that risks burnout, discouragement, and apathy – all signs of initiative fatigue.

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Physicians In Congress: A Prescription For Better Health Policy?


March 5th, 2014
 
by Brian Powers and Sachin Jain

Editor’s note: This post is also authored by Sachin H. Jain of Harvard Medical School and Boston VA Medical Center.

Physicians in Congress are on the rise. From 1960 to 2004, only 25 of the 2196 members of Congress were physicians. During an era that brought such fundamental changes to health policy as the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, physicians were disproportionately less likely to hold congressional office than their counterparts in law (979) and in business (298). In recent years, the ranks of physician-representatives have swelled—twenty physicians currently hold seats in the 113th Congress.

This surge in membership comes at a crucial time, for health care has become a defining issue in American politics. The passage of the Affordable Care Act has divided the nation and brought party relations to a standstill. In the 2012 presidential election, health care ranked as the second most important issue to voters, its highest level in twenty years. And with health care spending projected to be the largest long-term contributor to national debt, the nation’s health and economic future depends on sound health policy. What role can this new cadre of physician-representatives play in shaping this process?

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The Payment Reform Landscape: Pay-For-Performance


March 4th, 2014
by Suzanne Delbanco

Editor’s note: This is the second post in a Health Affairs Blog series by Catalyst for Payment Reform Executive Director Suzanne Delbanco. Over the coming months, Delbanco will examine how different methods of payment reform are being employed and how well they’re working. The first post in the series provided an overview of payment reform; this post examines pay-for-performance.

One of our core beliefs at Catalyst for Payment Reform (CPR) is that we need to move away from fee-for-service, toward new models that pay for care based on value, not volume. And while our National Scorecard on Payment Reform shows these new payment models are spreading, we still don’t know if they are really delivering the value we hope for — higher-quality care at more affordable prices. So we decided to make 2014 a year “all about the evidence,” taking an in-depth look at different payment reform models and assessing whether they are proving to enhance value. We’re delighted Health Affairs Blog is our partner in this journey. This month we examine pay-for-performance.

What is pay-for-performance? Is it widespread?

A pay-for-performance (P4P) model provides what are typically financial incentives to providers to improve the quality of the care they deliver and/or reduce costs. In CPR’s terminology, pay-for-performance is an “upside only” method of payment reform. The model gives health care providers the chance for a financial upside – such as a bonus — but no added financial risk, or downside. Our 2013 National Scorecard on Payment Reform demonstrated that almost 11 percent of commercial payments are value-oriented; approximately 1.6 percent of commercial payments are fee-for-service with pay-for-performance.

Despite the small portion of dollars flowing through pay-for-performance programs, we know it is a relatively popular model of payment reform. According to a 2010 report issued by the National Conference on State Legislatures (NCSL), an estimated 85 percent of state Medicaid programs were expected to operate some type of pay-for-performance program by 2011. Provisions in the Affordable Care Act expand the amount of pay-for-performance in Medicare as well.

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The Latest Health Wonk Review


February 28th, 2014
by Chris Fleming

David Harlow at HealthBlawg offers this week’s edition of the Health Wonk Review. All of the posts in David’s “In Like A Lion” Review reward reading, including the Health Affairs Blog post by Mark McClellan and coauthors at Brookings on how to pay for Medicare physician payment reform.

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Patients’ Views On Reforming The Physician Fee-For-Service Payment System


February 28th, 2014
by David Schleifer

Virtually all serious proposals for health care cost containment include reforming the fee-for-service payment system.  Last fall’s bipartisan proposal to fix Medicare’s sustainable growth rate included provisions to reward physicians for providing high-value rather than high-volume care.  Ostensibly, realigning physicians’ financial incentives would lead to higher quality, better coordinated, and more appropriate care.

But would patients necessarily be aware that their physicians are being paid differently? And would they even care? A new research report from Public Agenda and the Kettering Foundation suggests that consumers could play a role in advancing payment reform.  But in order to work through the trade-offs of changing the system, employers and payers must help members of the public understand that most reimbursement is currently fee-for-service.

Public Agenda asked a total of 44 insured and uninsured Americans, 40 to 64 years old, to deliberate together in focus groups over the pros and cons of several approaches to cost containment. Participants had some recent contact with the health care system as patients but none were seriously ill. They considered payment reform, price transparency, increased consumer cost-sharing, government price-setting, and expanded access to Medicare, among other approaches.  We held the deliberative focus groups in February and March 2013 in Secaucus, New Jersey; Montgomery, Alabama; and Cincinnati, Ohio, as well as a pilot in Stamford, Connecticut. After the groups, we followed up with participants for in-depth interviews. These focus groups do not provide information about how other types of consumers, particularly young people, view different approaches to addressing health care costs.

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Exhibit Of The Month: Virtual Visits On The Rise


February 27th, 2014
by Rob Lott

At Health Affairs Blog, we’re excited to introduce a new regular feature. Each month, Health Affairs editors will review all the tables, charts, graphs and maps that have run in the latest print edition of the journal. After deliberating in a dark, but smoke-free, backroom, we’ll emerge to crown the most compelling, creative or surprising exhibit as our Exhibit of the Month!  Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This exhibit shows how, within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California system, the number of virtual physician visits grew from 4.1 million in 2008 to 10.5 million in 2013.

According to Pearl, “In 2008 KPNC implemented an impatient  and ambulatory care electronic health record system for its 3.4 million members and developed a suite of patient-friendly Internet, mobile, and video tools.”  Among these tools is a system that allows patients to send secure e-mail messages to their primary care physician.  KPNC physicians are now expected to respond within 24 hours of receiving the message.  This system builds on the 10-15 minute physician telephone visits that KPNC has offered patients for more than a decade.

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Open Payments: A Matter Of Maintaining Trust


February 27th, 2014
by Anita Griner

For decades, it’s been no secret that some physicians have financial relationships with health care manufacturing companies. For example, a pharmaceutical firm might fund a cardiologist at an academic medical center to research an experimental medication for lowering cholesterol. Or, an orthopedic surgeon might receive a consulting fee from a medical device manufacturer for counsel about an artificial hip.

These widespread collaborations can involve gifts, meals, speaking fees, travel support, or payment for research activities. The good news is that these joint efforts have led to the discovery, design, and development of landmark drugs and life-saving devices, as well as numerous other major therapeutic inventions and innovations.

However, these commonplace transactions between physicians and the makers of drugs, devices, biological and medical supplies, or group purchasing organizations (GPOs) also cause considerable controversy. That’s because such payments from manufacturers to providers sometimes introduce conflicts of interest. Improper influence over research, education, and clinical decision-making can be exerted. Clinical integrity and patient care can be compromised. More explicitly, a physician may tout one drug over another during a continuing education session, primarily because he happens to be receiving a grant from its manufacturer.

Among consumers’ most serious concerns is that such financial relationships have always occurred privately, known only to the parties directly involved while the public remained in the dark.

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HA Web First: Improved Prescribing And Reimbursement Practices In China


February 26th, 2014
by Tracy Gnadinger

Pay-for-performance—reimbursing health care providers based on the results they achieved with their patients as a way to improve quality and efficiency—has become a major component of health reforms in the United States, the United Kingdom, and other affluent countries. Although the approach has also become popular in the developing world, there has been little evaluation of its impact. A new study, released today as a Web First by Health Affairs, examines the effects of pay-for-performance, combined with capitation, in China’s largely rural Ningxia Province.

Between 2009 and 2012, authors Winnie Yip, Timothy Powell-Jackson, Wen Chen, Min Hu, Eduardo Fe, Mu Hu, Weiyan Jian, Ming Lu, Wei Han, and William C. Hsiao, in collaboration with the provincial government, conducted a matched-pair, cluster-randomized experiment to review that province’s primary care providers’ antibiotic prescribing practices, health spending, and several other factors. They found a near-15 percent reduction in antibiotic prescriptions and a small decline in total spending per visit to community clinics.

The authors note that the success of this experiment has motivated the government of Ningxia Province to expand this intervention to the entire province. “From a policy perspective, our study offers several additional valuable lessons,” they conclude. “Provider patterns of overprescribing and inappropriate prescribing cannot be changed overnight; nor can patient demand, for which antibiotics are synonymous with quality care. Provider payment reform probably needs to be accompanied by training for providers and health education for patients.”

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Empathy: The First Step To Improving Health Outcomes


February 25th, 2014
by Aubrey Hill

Health care providers across the country are diagnosing, prescribing, and bandaging, but for many patients, that may not be enough to improve health.

Health care providers have a unique opportunity to improve patient health outcomes by practicing empathy for their patients and complex life circumstances. Empathy is defined as, “the ability to understand and share the feelings of another,” and studies have shown that empathy is an important skill for health care providers and is significantly associated with improved clinical outcomes.

Social Determinants of Health

Social and environmental factors (also known as social determinants of health) have a larger impact on health than medical intervention. Social determinants of health such as income, education, food and housing access, and racial and ethnic inequality affect the health of a person from birth to death, and can be difficult to understand and control for within a health care visit. Due to a lack of social resources, patients are unable to fully comply with treatment plans, follow provider instructions, return for a follow-up visit, and ultimately, experience good health outcomes. A few specific examples include: problems accessing care without insurance, finding funds to cover needed services or prescriptions, securing transportation to get to and from appointments on time, or speaking the same language as a health care provider.

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