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Adverse Events In Older Adults: The Need For Better Long-Term Care Financing And Delivery Innovation


November 20th, 2014

Evidence mounts that a major disconnect exists between the services most frail older adults need and what they get. The vast majority of frail older adults (around 75 percent) who face challenges in taking care of themselves live at home. According to new research from Vicki Freedman and Brenda Stillman, published in the most recent issue of The Milbank Quarterly, almost a third of these older adults report having an adverse consequence as a result of not getting the help they need. These consequences are pretty grim – the most frequently reported event being wet clothes associated with an unmet need around toileting.

But the most shocking statistic from this research is that hiring a paid helper appears to do little to protect against these consequences. Among those who hired help, nearly 60 percent reported adverse consequences. No doubt this reflects a higher level of need: paid helpers are brought in when the risk is quite high. But, it also reflects an inadequacy in support — an analogous group living in supportive housing (i.e., residential care or assisted living facilities) reported these events at a much lower rate (36 percent).

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Medicare, Medicaid, And Pharmaceuticals: The Price Of Innovation


November 20th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series of several posts stemming from presentations given at “The Law of Medicare and Medicaid at Fifty,” a conference held at Yale Law School on November 6 and 7.

Through much of the last half century, Medicare and Medicaid (MM) have not for the most part supported research intended to lead to new drugs. For their role in drug development, we need to look to infrastructure and incentives. The record of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) illustrates the potential of both for pharmaceutical innovation. The current budget of NIH, the big elephant in the zoo of the federal biomedical enterprise, is $30 billion, but apart from a dozen small programs devoted to targeted drug development, most of these billions are not aimed directly at pharmaceutical innovation (See page 234).

Yet the NIH investment in biomedicine has indirectly fueled drug development in the private sector to a huge degree. It has paid for the training of biomedical scientists and clinicians, many of whom went on to staff the drug industry, especially its laboratories. NIH-sponsored research has also generated basic knowledge and technologies and it has encouraged universities to spin out their potentially useful findings into the industry by allowing for the patenting and licensing of the findings.

Like NIH, MM has helped fuel drug development indirectly by supporting selected experimental cancer treatments, medical education, and some clinical research and training. But investment in these activities has been small and their impact on drug development apparently very limited. In contrast to NIH, the MM stimulus to drug innovation has resided not in the production of new scientists or the patented uses of new knowledge, but principally in markets and pricing.

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The Case For Advancing Access To Health Coverage And Care For Immigrant Women And Families


November 19th, 2014

Before the end of the year, the Obama administration is expected to announce that millions of undocumented immigrants will be able to lawfully stay in the United States. The new Congress may also take action on immigration reform legislation. Regardless of how it happens, any immigration policy change presents a good opportunity to revisit what has gone wrong with insurance coverage and health care for millions of immigrants, both undocumented and lawfully present, living and working in communities across the country.

A web of policy barriers to public and private insurance options effectively keeps millions of immigrant women and their families from affordable coverage and the basic health care—including sexual and reproductive health services—that coverage makes possible. Removing these barriers would advance the health and economic well-being of immigrant women, their families, and society as a whole. Most immediately, administrative steps advancing access for even some immigrants would be an important step forward. The case for doing so is compelling.

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Dear Governor-Elect: Some Health Policy Counsel


November 18th, 2014

Congratulations on your election on November 3. It is a mandate for your vision and leadership.  Now, like the proverbial dog who has caught the meat truck — where to begin with this business of governing?

As you contemplate the work in front of you, I would like to offer some (unsolicited) advice about a possible state health policy agenda, borne from my own work and observing states across the country. The recommendations are non-ideological and substance-neutral.  You will look hard to find a reference to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) here. The challenges states face in health care are so large they defy simple solutions and require collaboration across our widening ideological divide; energy spent attacking the ACA is energy diverted from these challenges.

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Challenges For People With Disabilities Within The Health Care Safety Net


November 18th, 2014

Medicare and Medicaid were passed to serve as safety nets for the country’s most vulnerable populations, a point that has been reemphasized by the expansion of the populations they serve, especially with regards to Medicaid. Yet, even after 50 years, the disabled population continues to be one whose health care needs are not being met. This community is all too frequently left to suffer health disparities due to cultural incompetency, stigma and misunderstanding, and an inability to create policy changes that cover the population as a whole and their acute and long-term needs.

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New Health Policy Brief: The 340B Drug Discount Program


November 18th, 2014

A new policy brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) examines the 340B Drug Discount Program. This federal program, established in 1992, was created to allow safety-net health care organizations serving vulnerable populations to buy outpatient prescription drugs at a discount. In the past few years, government reports have highlighted deficiencies in the oversight and management of the 340B program, whose sales in 2012 were reported by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to total $6.9 billion.

The program has also received more attention as a result of two factors: the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) addition of more program-eligible institutions and new guidelines from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) allowing program participants to contract with multiple pharmacies. Some critics have raised concerns about a philosophical difference between the original intent of the program (helping safety-net institutions to stretch limited resources) from the fact that many institutions see a profit when public and private payers reimburse them at a rate higher than what they paid for the drugs.

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Continuity Of Care For Chronic Conditions: Threats, Opportunities, And Policy


November 18th, 2014

Continuity of care is a bedrock principle of the patient-doctor relationship and is believed to be a fundamental attribute of high-quality medical care. Mounting evidence suggests that continuity of care for patients with chronic conditions prevents hospitalizations, reduces health care costs, and may prolong life in some populations.

Because patients are most likely to have longitudinal relationships with their pediatricians, family physicians, and internists, taken together, these primary care doctors are integral to translating continuity into meaningful care coordination. However, within the rapidly shifting landscape of health care delivery in the United States, continuity of care is simultaneously threatened and promoted by emerging care models.

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Analysis Of Medicare Spending Slowdown Leads Health Affairs Blog October Most-Read List


November 17th, 2014

Loren Adler and Adam Rosenberg’s examination of the causes of slower Medicare spending growth was the most-read Health Affairs Blog post in October. Their post was followed by Jeff Goldsmith’s interview with former Kaiser Permanente CEO George Halvorson.

Next on the top-ten list was J. Stephen Morrison’s look at the US response to Ebola and the role of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Tom Frieden, followed by Tim Jost’s post on reference pricing and network adequacy.

The full list is below:

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How Consumers Might Game The 90-Day Grace Period And What Can Be Done About It


November 17th, 2014

Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), individuals receiving a federal subsidy are entitled to a three-month premium nonpayment grace period. As long as such an individual has paid at least the first month’s premium of the year, in any subsequent month the individual has three months to make the premium payment before coverage is terminated.

The grace period has obvious benefits for consumers, yet as a recent Health Affairs Health Policy Brief describes, this provision of the law has created significant apprehension among doctors and other health care providers who worry they will go unpaid when coverage is retroactively terminated for their patients. Unfortunately, as we explain here, this provision could have even broader adverse implications for the health care system.

The grace period law could encourage subsidized individuals to regularly pay only nine months of premiums and receive, in effect, twelve months of coverage. Should this gaming become widespread it could increase premiums (perhaps by as much as several percentage points) for everyone who purchases coverage in the individual (non-group) exchanges.

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Implementing Health Reform: Setting The Stage For 2015 Open Enrollment


November 16th, 2014

On November 15, 2014, the Affordable Care Act marketplaces reopened for 2015 enrollment, the second year of ACA coverage.  On November 14, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Office of Personnel Management released guidance and reports laying the groundwork for the second year.  This post covers these and notes briefly a couple of ACA court decisions that also came down on November 14.

Plan data release.  CMS released a number of data files containing information on plans available on the marketplaces for 2015 and their rates.  First, the release includes “landscape files” including plans available by county along with premium and cost-sharing data for selected scenarios and services for the 2015 plan year for the federally facilitated marketplace and federally facilitated SHOP.

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Medicaid At 50: From Exclusion To Expansion To Universality


November 14th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series of several posts stemming from presentations given at “The Law of Medicare and Medicaid at Fifty,” a conference held at Yale Law School on November 6 and 7.

For almost five decades, Medicaid has been a safety net with gaping holes. Medicaid has provided invaluable health care access for the “deserving poor”—the impoverished blind, disabled, children, pregnant women, and elderly—but they only comprise approximately 40 percent of the nation’s poor. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), as part of its comprehensive insurance coverage architecture, rendered all Americans earning up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) eligible for Medicaid. Through the effort to “provide everybody … some basic security when it comes to their health care,” the ACA adopted a universal approach to health care access. Universality is a fundamentally different philosophical approach in American health care, and an important progression away from the stigmatizing rhetoric of the “deserving poor.”

The Supreme Court nearly thwarted the possibility of universality by holding the Medicaid expansion unduly coercive and rendering expansion optional for the states. Ever since, states have been exercising that option, deciding whether to expand in a highly dynamic dialogue that has occurred both intrastate and extra-state with the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This dialogue has resulted in four waves of Medicaid expansion, each of which has exhibited greater boldness on the part of the states in their proposals to HHS, and greater flexibility on the part of HHS in accepting state ideas for expansion. On a spectrum of federalism, the waves move from cooperation to assertions of state sovereignty. But, Medicaid’s new universality provides an absolute backstop for HHS in these negotiations, a point at which federal policy should not accommodate the rent-seeking behavior of the states.

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Risk And Reform Of Long-Term Care


November 14th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series of several posts stemming from presentations given at “The Law of Medicare and Medicaid at Fifty,” a conference held at Yale Law School on November 6 and 7.

The 50th Anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid offers an opportunity to reflect on how U.S. social policy has conceived of the problem of long-term care.

Social insurance programs aim to create greater security—typically financial security—for American families (See Note 1). Programs for long-term care, however, have had mixed results. The most recent attempt at reform, which Ted Kennedy ushered through as a part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), called the CLASS Act, was actuarially unsound and later repealed. Medicare and especially Medicaid, the two primary government programs to address long-term care needs, are criticized for failing to meet the needs of people with a disability or illness, who need long-term services or supports. These critiques are valid.

Even more troublesome, however, long-term care policy, especially in its most recent evolution toward home-based care, has intensified a second type of insecurity for Americans. This insecurity arises when someone becomes responsible for the long-term care of a loved one. In a longer forthcoming article, I argue that this insecurity—which I call “next-friend risk”—poses a serious threat to Americans and needs to be addressed. (I borrow the phrase next friend from a legal term for a person who in litigation represents someone with a disability who is otherwise unable to represent him or herself. Although not a legal guardian, the next friend protects the interests of an incompetent person.)

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The Latest Health Wonk Review


November 14th, 2014

A belated hat tip to Wing of Zock, where Jennifer Salopek produced a great Health Wonk Review last week. In her “election week edition,” Jennifer gives an overview of many insightful posts, including a Health Affairs Blog post by Lawrence Gostin on the United States’ misguided self-interest on ebola.

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Reforming Medicare: What Does The Public Want?


November 13th, 2014

Is Medicare adequately meeting the needs of seniors, or are there ways that its core attributes could be improved? Numerous elected officials, policymakers, and other thought leaders have offered perspectives on ways to change the program. Few efforts, however, have been directed at understanding how the public—given accurate information, a variety of options, and a valid structure for weighing the pros and cons—would change Medicare’s basic design.

The MedCHAT Project

Recently, the American Enterprise Institute and the Brookings Institution co-hosted a briefing on the results of a California project that did just that. The “MedCHAT” project, sponsored by the nonprofit, nonpartisan Center for Healthcare Decisions, asked 800 residents—the lay public, as well as health care professionals and community leaders—to consider Medicare’s current benefits and decide if those should be changed. Respondents represented the full spectrum of age, race, ethnicity, education, and income level.

Using an interactive, computer-based system, participants were asked to respond as “social decisionmakers;” they were tasked with making Medicare more responsive to the needs of current and future generations without imposing a greater cost burden on the country. The computer-based CHAT (“Choosing All Together”) program uses actuarial estimates to show the relative costs of health care benefits, allowing participants to make trade-offs with an understanding of the fiscal impact each benefit has on the program.

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Health Affairs Web First: For Global Health Programs Aiding Developing Countries, Analyzing A New Funding Model


November 13th, 2014

Development assistance for health in low-and-middle-income countries nearly tripled from 2001 to 2010, with much of that growth directed toward the response to HIV. Donor agencies struggle to determine how much assistance a country should receive. A new study, recently released as a Health Affairs Web First, presents three allocation methodologies to align funding with priorities.

The study authors Victoria Fan, Amanda Glassman, and Rachel Silverman then select a model—one with enough flexibility to solve mismatches between disease burdens and allocations—to evaluate the progress that could be made by one organization—the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria—in fighting HIV. The authors found that under the new funding model, substantial shifts in the Global Fund’s portfolio are likely to result from concentrating resources in countries with more HIV cases and lower per capita income.

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High Quality, Affordable Care: Making The Case For Smarter Networks


November 13th, 2014

Narrow networks are one means health insurance plans have used to mitigate increases in health insurance premiums. These networks have become more prevalent since the expansion of coverage brought about by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). But these narrow networks have given rise to complaints that consumers are being denied access to, and choice of, providers. These complaints are causing policymakers to consider, and in some cases adopt, new laws and regulations on network adequacy.

In the following blog post, I argue that policymakers should consider that there are different types of narrow networks and should be careful not to adopt policies that inhibit new contractual arrangements among payers, providers, and hospitals, such as Accountable Care Organizations, which hold the promise of better quality care at lower cost. At the same time, issuers must provide accurate and current information on which hospitals and providers are in the network and are accepting new patients, and must make the case that smarter networks can lead to better outcomes at lower cost.

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Health Care Accelerators: An Innovative Response To Federal Policy Mandates


November 12th, 2014

Health-focused startup “accelerators” are a new approach to developing solutions to problems in health care. An accelerator serves as a short-term incubator for startups to build innovative new businesses through funding, mentorship, network access and coaching.

Accelerators have been a critical part of the technology economy and innovation ecosystem since the 2006 launch of YCombinator. Health care-focused accelerators emerged in 2011, largely as a result of changes in national health care policy–including the HITECH Act and the Affordable Care Act–and the perceived new opportunities these changes created. Since that time, there has been tremendous growth in accelerators across the nation supported by a diverse set of stakeholders, part of a larger innovation economy that has formed in response to federal policy making.

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The Short-Term And Long-Term Outlook Of Drug Coupons


November 12th, 2014

In the October 2014 Health Affairs article, “Specialty Drug Coupons Lower Out-Of-Pocket Costs And May Improve Adherence At The Risk Of Increasing Premiums,” Catherine Starner and coauthors explore the relationship between drug coupons and specialty drugs. Specialty drugs, primarily injectables and biologics, are costly drugs used to treat complicated, chronic conditions that typically require special handling, administration, and monitoring. Starner et al. report that specialty drugs have an average monthly cost to patients and payers of about $3,500.

In their innovative study, Starner et al. find that nearly half of the patients in their sample who were prescribed specialty drugs used personal drug coupons to reduce their personal financial responsibilities. Coupons come in the form of maximum copay and monthly savings cards, and can be accessed from the brand-name manufacturer’s website, printed out, and cashed in at the pharmacy.

Manufacturers promote drug coupons as supplementary patient assistance programs that can fill gaps in insurance coverage by reducing individual patients’ responsibilities for out-of-pocket health care costs related to high-cost specialty drugs or other pharmaceutical products. For example, patients taking etanercept (Enbrel), an expensive biologic specialty drug indicated for rheumatoid arthritis, can receive savings via the Enbrel Support plan, which reduces the monthly co-pay to $0 for the first six months and $10 per month thereafter.

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Implementing Health Reform: New HHS 2015 Marketplace Enrollment Estimates


November 11th, 2014

On November 10, 2014, the HHS Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) released an estimate of “How Many Individuals Might Have Marketplace Coverage After the 2015 Open Enrollment Period.”  ASPE estimates that 9.1 to 9.9 million will be enrolled, substantially lower than the 13 million enrollee estimate the Congressional Budget Office issued in the Spring of 2014.

Both the ASPE and CBO estimates see the marketplaces as eventually covering 24 to 25 million people.  But while CBO projected that the marketplaces would reach this number in 3 years, ASPE believes that a 4 to 5 year ramp-up period is more realistic based on the launch experience of other programs, like Medicaid and CHIP.

Examining the numbers.  The marketplaces enrolled 8.1 million individuals during the 2014 open enrollment period.  The ASPE brief states that 7.1 million were still enrolled as of October of 2014.  It is not clear whether or not this number includes 112,000 individuals that HHS recently announced have been dropped from the marketplaces because they failed adequately to document their immigration or citizenship status.  HHS has also announced that another 105,000 individuals will have their financial eligibility determined on data available to HHS (in most instances 2012 tax returns), because they failed to document the income levels they claimed on their applications.  These individuals will not lose coverage, but may receive smaller tax credits.

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New Health Policy Brief: The Family Glitch


November 10th, 2014

A new health policy brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) looks at the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) so-called family glitch. Low-to-moderate-income families are eligible for a subsidy to purchase health insurance on the Marketplace if the cost of health coverage through their employers is more than 9.5 percent of their household income.

However, this formula is based on individual-only coverage and does not account for the higher cost of a family insurance plan. If the family glitch is not fixed, the path to affordable insurance for many spouses and children could be blocked—and children could be even further impacted if Congress fails to extend funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) after the current appropriation ends in September 2015, which the brief also explains.

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