Blog Home

Archive for the 'Public Health' Category




Moving Beyond Wellness ROI Toward Employment-Based Cultures Of Health: Part I


January 26th, 2015

With their recent post declaring that employment-based wellness initiatives “increase rather than decrease employer spending on health care with no net health benefit,” Al Lewis and coauthors are continuing to exert a clarifying presence in a field with a history of unsubstantiated claims and suspect methods. This conclusion is not supported by the work with which we and others have been associated and is thus not one with which we agree.

Nevertheless, Lewis et al. are to be acknowledged for fueling the need for a sharper focus on the core challenge at hand for employers: how best to improve the value of their health care investment—that is, how to manage health care costs while improving employee health and productivity—in ways that are sustainable. Incremental, inconsistent and, at times, maddeningly slow progress has been made. Employment-based wellness has been at the forefront, even as the need for quality improvement continues.

Moreover leading employers with well-developed management and measurement approaches have moved well beyond calculating the return on investment of individual wellness efforts and are demonstrating the more comprehensive value of building “cultures of health.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Additional Requirements For Charitable Hospitals: Final Rules On Community Health Needs Assessments And Financial Assistance


January 23rd, 2015

On December 29, the Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service released long-awaited final regulations implementing Affordable Care Act provisions that impose additional obligations on charitable hospital organizations covered by §501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.  Published in the Federal Register on December 31 2014, the regulations are massive, consolidating a series of prior proposals into a single final body of regulatory law.  The regulations affect more than 80 percent of U.S. hospitals, both the 60 percent that operate as private nonprofit entities and the 23 percent that operate as governmental units.

Because state and local governments typically condition their own sales, property, and corporate income tax exemptions for nonprofit entities to a hospital’s §501(c)(3) status, the final regulations carry broad and deep implications from both a policy and financial perspective.  According to the Congressional Budget Office the 2002 the national value of the federal tax exemption exceeded $12 billion, a figure that undoubtedly has risen considerably.

Read the rest of this entry »

Last Year Was A Wild One For Health Law — What’s On The Docket For 2015?


January 22nd, 2015

Everywhere we look, we see the tremendous impact of new legal developments—whether regulatory or statutory, federal or state—on health and health care. These topics range from insurance to intellectual property to religion to professionalism to civil rights. They remain among the most important questions facing Americans today.

This post is the first in a series that will stem from the Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review event to be held at Harvard Law School on Friday, January 30, 2015. The conference, which is free and open to the public, brings together leading experts to review major developments in health law over the previous year, and preview what is to come.

The event is sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the New England Journal of Medicine, and co-sponsored by Health Affairs, The Hastings Center, and the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School. Below, we will highlight a few themes that have emerged so far. The conference’s speakers will author a series of posts that follow on more specific topics.

Read the rest of this entry »

How Community Health Workers Can Reinvent Health Care Delivery In The US


January 16th, 2015

As health policy, research and practice are becoming increasingly focused on improving the health of populations and addressing social determinants of health, Community Health Workers (CHWs) may be just what the doctor ordered. As part of the public health workforce with ties to the local community, CHWs can now be reimbursed by Medicaid for providing preventive services if recommended by a physician or other licensed practitioner.

This groundbreaking CMS regulatory change, along with policy support from the Affordable Care Act, holds the promise of bridging the gap between mainstream health care and community health through expanding the CHW profession and its impact on clinical care. Much like other disruptive changes in health care, however, fulfilling this potential will require a new way of thinking among state policymakers and the health care system at large.

Read the rest of this entry »

Reconsidering Pauly And Coauthors’ ‘Economic Framework For Preventive Care Advice’


January 12th, 2015

In the November issue of Health Affairs, Mark Pauly and coauthors criticize the lack of cost-effectiveness considerations in the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which mandates that health plans include preventive care free at the point of use. The bodies critiqued, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, convene health experts to develop recommendations for immunizations and other preventive services.

According to the authors, the task entrusted to these bodies by the ACA, of offering sound advice on preventive care without considering its cost-effectiveness, is “impossible to do well.” They propose instead an “economic framework” under which only services with “substantial external benefits” (e.g. a vaccination for contagious disease) would be mandated for coverage. We believe this position is misguided.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Importance Of Zip Code In Determining One’s Health Tops 2014 GrantWatch Blog Most-Read List


January 9th, 2015

Happy New Year! We have compiled a list of the ten most-read posts on GrantWatch Blog during 2014, in case you missed any of them.

  1. “Zip Code Overrides DNA Code When It Comes to a Healthy Community” (January 30, 2014). This post by Anne Warhover, former president and CEO of the Colorado Health Foundation, was by far the most-read post. She mentions the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Commission to Build a Healthier America, of which she was a commissioner, and relevant activities in Colorado. We also feel sure that Warhover’s post set a record for the number of re-tweets. Read more about Warhover here.
  2. “A World of Darkness: What If Thomas Edison Had to Write Grant Proposals to Invent the Light Bulb?” (February 18, 2014). This post by Jeffrey Brenner, executive director of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers and a family physician, came in at no. 2. Brenner is also a MacArthur Fellow. This post was published in partnership with Grantmakers In Health.
  3. “Elevating the Role of the Medical Assistant” (March 3, 2014). This post by Karen Wolk Feinstein, president and CEO of the Jewish Healthcare Foundation, in Pittsburgh, was the third most-read post in 2014. Feinstein is also president and CEO of its affiliated organization, the Pittsburgh Regional Health Initiative.
  4. “Foundations Supporting Stewardship of Health Care Resources through Medical Education and Training” (January 22, 2014). Daniel Wolfson and Leslie Tucker of the ABIM Foundation wrote this post about a convening of medical educators, students, residents, and other stakeholders. The ABIM Foundation and the Josiah Macy Jr Foundation held this meeting.
  5. “The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: Creating Partnerships to Build a Culture of Health” (September 11, 2014). David Colby, who just retired from the RWJF, wrote this popular post about the foundation’s new focus in its work. As Colby notes, “Health actually is a part of everything!”
  6. “Online ACA Marketplaces: the Value of Consumer Experience Assessments” (June 17, 2014). Marian Mulkey of the California HealthCare Foundation (CHCF) and Claudia Page, a consultant to the foundation, wrote this post about people signing up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Page is a former CHCF staffer.
  7. “The Hitachi Foundation Sheds Light on the New Role Frontline Workers Play in Health Care” (April 24, 2014). Tom Strong of the Hitachi Foundation wrote this post. Like no. 3, it mentions the role of medical assistants, which seems to be a popular subject!
  8. “Toxic Stress in Children and the Importance of Listening between the Lines to What Kids Say” (April 29, 2014). I wrote this post about Nadine Burke Harris’s speech at the Grantmakers In Health 2014 annual meeting in Atlanta.
  9. “If You Partner, They Might Just Come: One Foundation’s Effort to Disseminate Data on Quality of Care” (March 13, 2014). Andy Krackov, also of the CHCF, wrote this post about CalQualityCare.org, which it manages.
  10.  “The Rippel Foundation and the RWJF Push Frontiers for Financing and Sustaining Improvements in Health” (February 13, 2014). Laura Landy, who leads the Fannie E. Rippel Foundation, wrote this post about a “project to explore the conditions needed to build a next-generation health system.”

 

Read the rest of this entry »

A (Global) Cornucopia Of Clues To Optimize Medication Use


January 6th, 2015

The most common patient care intervention, issuing a prescription, is fraught with continuing challenges for patients, their caregivers, and practitioners. Patients rely on medications across a continuum of care, with expectations for self-management; some experience unintended problems along the way. For older patients, such problems often result in emergency hospitalizations, many of which could be prevented.

Historically, integration to support safe and appropriate medicine use across the U.S. health care ecosystem has been sporadic, including within our siloed Medicare Part D benefit. Other countries, however, are well on their way to better integration.

In the following blog post, we share examples from the United Kingdom and Australia. Fortunately, U.S. practitioners who recognize optimizing medication use as an essential element of population health can look to several recent federal opportunities to support their efforts.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Value of Workplace Health Promotion (Wellness) Programs


December 22nd, 2014

The recent Health Affairs Blog post by Al Lewis, Vik Khanna, and Shana Montrose titled, “Workplace Wellness Produces No Savings” has triggered much interest and media attention. It highlights the controversy surrounding the value of workplace health promotion programs that 22 authors addressed in an article published in the September 2014 issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine titled, “Do Workplace Health Promotion (Wellness) Programs Work?”  That article also inspired several follow-up discussions and media reports, including one published by New York Times columnists Frakt and Carroll who answered the above question with: “usually not.”

There are certainly many points of contention and areas for continued discussion on this topic. It turns out that Lewis et al. and I agree on many things, and there are other areas where we see things differently.

Read the rest of this entry »

Request For Abstracts: Health Affairs Non-Communicable Disease Theme Issue


December 19th, 2014

Health Affairs is planning a theme issue on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in September 2015. The issue will present work that describes the burden of NCDs, approaches to prevention and treatment of NCDs, and analysis of policies and initiatives aimed at prevention and treatment. The issue will have a global perspective.

We invite interested authors to submit abstracts for consideration for this issue.

We are using a broad definition of NCDs to include cancer, cardiovascular disease, respiratory illness, diabetes, mental illness, and the like. The issue will not focus on injuries, per se, but will address disability as an element of the disease burden of NCDs.

We plan to publish 15-20 peer-reviewed articles including research, analyses, and commentaries from leading researchers and scholars, analysts, industry experts, and health and health care stakeholders. Some papers will provide an overview of an issue relevant to NCDs, but we are particularly interested in empirical analyses of specific policies, care models, and other approaches to addressing NCDs. All papers must focus on issues of interest to public policy makers and private leaders in health care and related sectors.

Read the rest of this entry »

Preparing US Hospitals To Safely Manage Ebola Virus-Infected Patients: At What Cost?


December 11th, 2014

Since Ebola first reached US shores this summer, hospitals nationwide have attempted to prepare. National guidance has been helpful, but no such guidance can deal with the fastidious attention to every minute and mundane aspect of caring for a patient with Ebola virus infection that could place a healthcare worker at risk if a breach occurs. Simulation training has helped to uncover defects and to assess our capacity to mitigate those defects.

Additionally, innumerable hours of countless healthcare workers, hospital administrators, infection control staff, facilities and environmental services providers, communications specialists, security personnel and others have been brought to bear focused on the task at hand. Despite this effort, in the 30 years since becoming a physician, I have never witnessed a greater, more palpable level of stress and anxiety among my peers.

Read the rest of this entry »

Should Doctors Deny Ebola Patients CPR?


December 11th, 2014

The first time I did CPR, coagulated blood spurted onto my new white coat from a wound in the patient’s chest. Another time a patient’s urine soaked through the knees of my pants as I knelt at his side.

Even in the best of conditions, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a spit-smeared, bloody business that can expose health care workers to all kinds of body fluids. Like all health care workers, I put on gloves and a game face and accept such things as part of patient care.

The 2014 Ebola outbreak changes all that. Hospitals all around the world are now training staff in personal protective equipment (PPE) use and convening rapid response teams. A key part of this process involves grappling with how dangerous it will be to perform CPR on patients with Ebola.

Fully 70 percent of those stricken with Ebola in 2014 have died. That means in countries like the United States where we attempt CPR routinely to save dying patients, health care workers will be called to resuscitate Ebola patients.

From placement of an artificial airway to the administration of chest compressions and beyond, each step in CPR can expose health care workers to body fluids containing as many as a million viral particles in each drop and well-proven to transmit Ebola. In contradistinction to the bowling alley and subway exposures that have drawn so much media attention, health care workers performing CPR on Ebola patients will truly be in the direct line of viral fire.

Read the rest of this entry »

Does Public Health Have A Future?


December 10th, 2014

Ebola’s arrival in the U.S. hit Americans with a jolt. Regardless of how you feel about the response to date, it should remind everyone of the importance of public health.

Fortunately, public health in the U.S. has built an extraordinary track record of success. Smallpox, one of the most dreaded diseases in history, was eradicated worldwide. New vaccines have sharply cut the toll of deaths and disabilities from H flu meningitis, tetanus, pneumococcal sepsis and other deadly diseases.

Adding folate to foods dramatically reduced neural tube defects in newborns. Safer cars and better roadway designs cut fatal crashes per million vehicle miles traveled by 90 percent. Because smoking is far less popular than it once was, 8 million Americans have been spared early and agonizing deaths from cancer, heart disease, emphysema, and other smoking-related diseases.

Read the rest of this entry »

Collaborating On A Culture Of Health: Buncombe County, North Carolina


December 2nd, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing series written for Health Affairs Blog by local leaders from communities honored with the annual Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Prize. In 2014, six winning communities were selected by RWJF from more than 250 applicants and celebrated for placing a priority on health and creating powerful partnerships to drive change.

Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains, at the junction of the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers, Asheville, N.C. is graced with natural beauty and an abundance of health and economic resources. But in 2012, many residents of Asheville and the surrounding Buncombe County area were struggling with poverty and chronic illness. So the community responded as advocates, public health experts, community leaders, and business leaders came together to establish a culture of health.

As County Health Director Gibbie Harris explained, “the thing that is really driving us forward is an interest in being the healthiest community in the country… We have people who are interested in social justice, and a desire to improve the lives of our friends and neighbors.”

Read the rest of this entry »

What Is The Future For Community Health Workers?


November 25th, 2014

I recently attended a symposium entitled “Community Health Workers: Getting the Job Done in Health Care Delivery.” (My concluding remarks begin at the 6:00:40 mark in the video.) Speakers examined the evolving role of Community Health Workers (CHWs) in the current era of delivery system reform. Health Affairs has published work documenting the importance of this part of the workforce, and our November issue is dedicated to the topic of “Collaborating for Community Health.”

I was asked to summarize some key points from the day-long conversation. In this post I highlight some of the themes covered.

Over the course of the day I heard the elements of two very different paths forward for community health workers. Each path was coherent and compelling, but they lead in very different directions.

Read the rest of this entry »

Recalling To Err’s Impact — And A Small But Telling IOM Mistake


November 25th, 2014

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the Institute of Medicine (IOM)’s To Err is Human report, which famously declared that from 44,000 to 98,000 Americans died each year from preventable mistakes in hospitals and another one million were injured. That blunt conclusion from a prestigious medical organization shocked the public and marked the arrival of patient safety as a durable and important public policy issue.

Alas, when it comes to providing the exact date of this medical mistakes milestone, the IOM itself is confused and, in a painful piece of irony, sometimes just plain wrong. That’s unfortunate, because the date of the report’s release is an important part of the story of its continued influence.

There’s no question among those of us who’d long been involved in patient safety that the report’s immediate and powerful impact took health policy insiders by surprise. The data the IOM relied upon, after all, came from studies that appeared years before and then vanished into the background noise of the Hundred Year War over universal health insurance. This time, however, old evidence was carefully rebottled in bright, compelling new soundbites.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Case For Advancing Access To Health Coverage And Care For Immigrant Women And Families


November 19th, 2014

Before the end of the year, the Obama administration is expected to announce that millions of undocumented immigrants will be able to lawfully stay in the United States. The new Congress may also take action on immigration reform legislation. Regardless of how it happens, any immigration policy change presents a good opportunity to revisit what has gone wrong with insurance coverage and health care for millions of immigrants, both undocumented and lawfully present, living and working in communities across the country.

A web of policy barriers to public and private insurance options effectively keeps millions of immigrant women and their families from affordable coverage and the basic health care—including sexual and reproductive health services—that coverage makes possible. Removing these barriers would advance the health and economic well-being of immigrant women, their families, and society as a whole. Most immediately, administrative steps advancing access for even some immigrants would be an important step forward. The case for doing so is compelling.

Read the rest of this entry »

Using Mobile Technology To Overcome Jurisdictional Challenges To A Coordinated Immunization Policy


November 14th, 2014

On March 20, 2014, the Government of Canada and the federal Minister of Health announced the release of ImmunizeCanada (ImmunizeCA), a smart phone application (app) designed to both provide accurate information on immunization for Canadians and allow them to track their and their family members’ immunizations. Based on a prototype developed for parents in Ontario and in partnership with the Canadian Public Health Association, our development team received funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada to build a national immunization app. Our task was to build an Apple- and Android-compatible app, containing all 13 provincial/territorial schedules and vaccine information from each jurisdiction in both Canadian official languages (French and English).

The application uses demographic information entered by the user and the most recent recommended provincial vaccination schedule to create a custom profile for multiple family members. It allows parents to track and carry their children’s immunizations records on their mobile device. The application also permits the creation of adult-specific schedules and includes information on travel vaccines. It is also possible to sync the app with your smartphone calendar, generate appointment reminders, print or share an immunization record by email, and access answers to common questions.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


November 14th, 2014

A belated hat tip to Wing of Zock, where Jennifer Salopek produced a great Health Wonk Review last week. In her “election week edition,” Jennifer gives an overview of many insightful posts, including a Health Affairs Blog post by Lawrence Gostin on the United States’ misguided self-interest on ebola.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: For Global Health Programs Aiding Developing Countries, Analyzing A New Funding Model


November 13th, 2014

Development assistance for health in low-and-middle-income countries nearly tripled from 2001 to 2010, with much of that growth directed toward the response to HIV. Donor agencies struggle to determine how much assistance a country should receive. A new study, recently released as a Health Affairs Web First, presents three allocation methodologies to align funding with priorities.

The study authors Victoria Fan, Amanda Glassman, and Rachel Silverman then select a model—one with enough flexibility to solve mismatches between disease burdens and allocations—to evaluate the progress that could be made by one organization—the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria—in fighting HIV. The authors found that under the new funding model, substantial shifts in the Global Fund’s portfolio are likely to result from concentrating resources in countries with more HIV cases and lower per capita income.

Read the rest of this entry »

Addressing The Threat Of Antibiotic Resistance: Policy Solutions To Fix A Broken Pipeline


November 6th, 2014

Recently, the White House released a major new national strategy to combat antibiotic resistance. As efforts begin to translate that unprecedented announcement into action, it is critical that any strategy to address resistance contain a plan to ensure an adequate antibiotic development pipeline. The overall number of antibiotics reaching the market has declined over time, with 29 and 23 new antibiotics approved in the U.S. in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively, but only nine between 2000 and 2010.

Meanwhile, the evolution of drug-resistance has outpaced the development of new antibiotics. Doctors routinely encounter patients with infections that do not respond to currently available treatments. Some life-threatening infections, such as those caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, are resistant to nearly all available therapies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that in the United States at least two million people are sickened by resistant bacteria each year and 23,000 die as a result.

Current State of Antibiotic Development

In order to better understand the pipeline and evaluate policies to spur antibiotic development, the Pew Charitable Trusts has identified antibacterial drugs in clinical development (Phases 1-3) for the U.S. market. Published on our website and updated quarterly, this resource provides policymakers, the medical community, and industry stakeholders with an up-to-date picture of drugs in development.

Read the rest of this entry »

Click here to email us a new post.