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Shifting From Depression Screening Alone To Evidence-Based Depression Treatment In ACOs


November 19th, 2014

In their October 2014 Health Affairs article, “Few ACOs Pursue Innovative Models That Integrate Care for Mental Illness And Substance Abuse With Primary Care,” Valerie Lewis et al. identified that the quality measures in an Accountable Care Organization’s (ACO) contract affect how well that ACO integrates behavioral and physical health integration.

The authors note that depression screening is a common measure among the ACO contracts that include behavioral health measures and suggest that additional measures could lead to further improvement. In this blog, we propose some additional measures and consider whether effective measures alone will be sufficient or just necessary to promote integrated care models that reduce costs and improve health for the ACO’s defined population.

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High Quality, Affordable Care: Making The Case For Smarter Networks


November 13th, 2014

Narrow networks are one means health insurance plans have used to mitigate increases in health insurance premiums. These networks have become more prevalent since the expansion of coverage brought about by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). But these narrow networks have given rise to complaints that consumers are being denied access to, and choice of, providers. These complaints are causing policymakers to consider, and in some cases adopt, new laws and regulations on network adequacy.

In the following blog post, I argue that policymakers should consider that there are different types of narrow networks and should be careful not to adopt policies that inhibit new contractual arrangements among payers, providers, and hospitals, such as Accountable Care Organizations, which hold the promise of better quality care at lower cost. At the same time, issuers must provide accurate and current information on which hospitals and providers are in the network and are accepting new patients, and must make the case that smarter networks can lead to better outcomes at lower cost.

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Yes, We Can Transcend Obamacare


November 6th, 2014

In a recent  Health Affairs Blog post, Washington and Lee University law professor Timothy Jost described a new health-reform plan designed by one of us (Roy) and fiscally modeled by the other (Parente) as a “serious proposal [that] deserves to be taken seriously.” Jost praises parts of the plan. Most notably, he writes that its suggested reform of Medicaid “makes a lot of sense and is similar to proposals made earlier by progressive commentators,” and describes its aim of enacting a uniform annual deductible for Medicare as a “common sense proposal.”

But much of Jost’s review is filled with ideological pique—there are various harrumphs about “nostrums” and “talking points” and “hobby horses.” His article contains some factual and analytical inaccuracies, but also a few good points worth discussing.

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An Emerging Consensus: Medicare Advantage Is Working And Can Deliver Meaningful Reform


November 6th, 2014

Since enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010, much of the attention in the policy community has been on modernizing Medicare’s traditional fee-for-service (FFS) program.  Through Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), larger “bundles” of payments to fee-for-service providers for episodes of care, and tests of pay-for-performance models, the hope is that the traditional Medicare model can be remade through sheer force of bureaucratic will.  The stated intent is to find a way to pay for value, not volume.

These efforts may or may not bear much fruit, but, over the longer term, it’s not likely to matter much.  That’s because a more important transformation of Medicare is already well underway and is occurring despite more resistance than assistance from the program’s bureaucracy.  According to the 2014 Medicare Trustees’ report, enrollment in Medicare Advantage – the private plan option in Medicare — has been surging for a decade.  In 2005 there were 5.8 million Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in MA plans — 13.6 percent of total enrollment in the program.  Today, there are 16.2 million beneficiaries in MA plans, or 30 percent of program enrollment. (See Table IV.C1)  In addition, the Medicare drug benefit, which constitutes about 12 percent of total program spending, is delivered entirely through private plans. (See Table II.B1)

As MA enrollment has surged, so has recognition of its improved value.  A recent, comprehensive review of the evidence conducted by Joseph Newhouse and Thomas McGuire of Harvard University makes a compelling case that MA plans are providing higher value services at less societal cost than the traditional FFS program.  Based on their findings, Newhouse and McGuire argue for policies that would provide incentives for even more beneficiaries to enroll in MA plans in the future.

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What About Lousy Hospitals?


November 5th, 2014

Excellence in American hospital care is rare. It is common knowledge that many hospitals fall alarmingly short on safety, quality, effectiveness, patient satisfaction, and cost. As Mark Chassin wrote in Health Affairs, “quality and safety problems in health care continue to routinely result in harm to patients. Desired progress will not be achieved unless substantial changes are made to the way in which quality improvement is conducted.”

What exactly should those “substantial changes” look like? Hospitals seeking excellence are pursuing various paths, but the best documented and most comprehensive is the “Baldrige journey.” The journey requires submission of a 50 page “Application” to rigorously developed, structured “Criteria,” followed by thorough review and scoring by a team of trained judges. Almost half the score is on results for patient care quality, patient satisfaction, worker satisfaction, and finances

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The Payment Reform Landscape: Benefit And Network Design Strategies To Complement Payment Reform


November 4th, 2014

For the past ten months on Health Affairs Blog, we’ve been discussing the evidence for different models of payment reform, examining everything from pay for performance to nonpayment. But no discussion of payment reform is complete without addressing benefit and network designs and how they can help or hinder various payment reforms.  When the right payment method is paired with the right benefit and/or network design, they can work together to help reduce costs and improve care.  There are a number of payment approaches that pair well with specific benefit and network design strategies to yield higher-quality, lower-cost care. Below we discuss a few of these effective pairings.

But before we get into the specifics, why it is important to motivate providers to deliver and patients to seek higher-value care?  Health care providers may not only respond to direct financial incentives, but they are also likely to respond to knowing information about their performance is being put in front of prospective and current patients.  They also may be more willing to accept new forms of payment if acceptance means payers will encourage more patients to seek their care.

On the flip side, patients are unlikely to know how their providers are paid.  But if motivated (financially and otherwise), patients may act on meaningful distinctions in price and quality by choosing higher-value providers, saving money for themselves and whoever else is footing the bill for their care.

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Grand-Aides And Health Policy: Reducing Readmissions Cost-Effectively


October 29th, 2014

Hospital readmissions for the same condition within 30 days likely should not occur, and most often indicate system failure. Readmitted patients are either discharged too early, should be placed into palliative care or hospice, or most often are victims of a failure in transition of care from hospital to home. Most hospitals and physicians would like to eliminate such readmissions, particularly now that payers like Medicare are penalizing hospitals for high rates of readmission. Numerous approaches have been tried to reduce readmissions, with recent published improvements between a 2 percent and 26 percent reduction.

The Grand-Aides® program features rigorous training of nurse aides or community health workers to work as nurse extenders, 5 Grand-Aides to one RN or NP supervisor, with approximately 50 patients per Grand-Aide per year. The Grand-Aides visit at home daily for the first 5 days post-discharge and then as ordered by the supervisor (e.g. 3 days the next week) for at least 30 days, extending as long as desired.

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Exhibit Of The Month: Comparing The Cost And Value Of Specialty And Traditional Drugs


October 27th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Month” series. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month’s exhibits, from the article, “Despite High Costs, Specialty Drugs May Offer Value For Money Comparable To That Of Traditional Drugs,” published in the October issue of Health Affairs, compare the value and costs of specialty and traditional drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration from 1999-2011.

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Implementing Health Reform: The Qualified Health Plan Federal Exchange Participation Agreement And More


October 21st, 2014

CMS continues to put the pieces into place that are needed for the launch of the 2015 coverage year.  On October 16, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released at its REGTAP.info website the certification agreement and privacy and security agreement that qualified health plan (QHP) insurers must sign with CMS to access the federally facilitated exchange (FFE), the federally facilitated SHOP (FF-SHOP), and CMS Data Services Hub.  The agreement focuses primarily on obligations that the QHP insurer undertakes to protect personally identifiable information and to ensure secure communications with CMS, although it also addresses the effective date and termination of the agreement and a few other issues.  Most of the terms of the agreement are unremarkable, and this post will only comment on a few.

QHP insurers undertake under the agreement to protect personally identifiable information and to ensure secure communications with CMS in conformity with applicable laws, regulations, and standards.  They must also ensure that their contractors and downstream entities comply with these requirements.  QHP insurers agree to report any personally identifiable information incidents or breaches to CMS within 72 to 96 hours.  This is a far cry from the one-hour breach reporting requirement proposed by CMS last year but never finalized, but perhaps recognizes the difficult of identifying and assessing a security breach.

The agreement expressly recognizes that QHP insurers have developed their products based on the assumption that advance premium tax credits and cost-sharing reduction payments will be available through the marketplace and that QHP insurers could have cause to terminate the agreement if this assumption ceases to be valid.  This could be interpreted as a reference to the Halbig/King litigation which currently threatens the availability of tax credits and cost-sharing reduction payments through the FFE, but could also have been included in recognition of the likely Republican takeover of the Senate and the possibility that the Republicans may accomplish through budget reconciliation or otherwise their longstanding goal of repealing the ACA.  As the agreement is renewable from year to year, this clause may contemplate contingencies in the indefinite as well as the near future

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Resources Don’t Solve Design Flaws


October 21st, 2014

The first three sessions of a conference I recently attended tackled some complex and important questions: How do we extend health insurance to people such as migrant and informal workers who don’t fit neatly into mainstream coverage programs? As we increase our investment in primary care, how do we assure that the performance of the primary care system is at the highest possible level? What types of evidence should we use as we make decisions in a dynamic health care system with limited opportunities for “gold standard” randomized controlled trials?

These are excellent questions, and they were perfect topics for a cutting-edge conference discussing the challenges facing the U.S. health care system.

But this conference was not about the U.S. health care system. These were opening “satellite” sessions at the Third Global Symposium on Health Systems Research held in Cape Town, South Africa.

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Vets Deserve The Right To Shop For Care


October 2nd, 2014

Editor’s note: For more on this topic, see the Health Affairs Blog post from Theodore Stefos and James Burgess, and stay tuned for an upcoming blog post from Joel Kupersmith. 

As former Procter & Gamble CEO Robert McDonald steps in to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), it’s difficult not to think about the thousands of physicians across the U.S. who are chomping at the bit to contribute to the fix. Even before his recently confirmed appointment, McDonald said his focus would be on getting veterans the benefits and care they deserve. This customer-focused approach and his appointment in general have been greeted with rare bipartisan praise and unanimous passing. However, as the saying goes, the devil is in the details.

According to reports, tens of thousands of veterans have been waiting three months or longer for an initial appointment. Three months? Data from athenahealth’s national, cloud-based network of more than 55,000 health providers representing approximately 57 million patient records, recently found that the median wait time for a primary care visit for a new patient last year was about three days; non-well-visit wait times averaged around one day.

The point is that veterans have been waiting far longer for appointments than the general population at a time when the health care provider ecosystem – whether hospital or practice – outside the VA often struggles to fill beds and open slots. Seemingly, there are providers nationwide who would be eager to care for these vets and benefit from their business. For new VA Secretary Robert McDonald, a renowned consumer-goods leader, this supply and demand scenario nearly solves itself.

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An Interview With George Halvorson: The Kaiser Permanente Renaissance, And Health Reform’s Unfinished Business


September 30th, 2014

For decades, health policymakers considered Kaiser Permanente the lode star of delivery system reform.  Yet by the end of 1999, the nation’s oldest and largest group model HMO had experienced almost three years of significant operating losses, the first in the plan’s history. It was struggling to implement a functional electronic health record, and had a reputation for inconsistent customer service.  But most seriously, it faced deep divisions between management and the leadership of its powerful Permanente Federation, which represents Kaiser’s more than 17,000 physicians, over both strategic direction and operations of the plan.

Against this backdrop, Kaiser surprised the health plan community by announcing in March 2002 the selection of a non-physician, George Halvorson, as its new CEO.  Halvorson had spent most of his career in the Twin Cities, most recently as CEO of HealthPartners, a successful mixed model health plan.  Halvorson’s reputation was as a product innovator; he not only developed a prototype of the consumer-directed health plan in the mid-1990’s, but also population health improvement objectives for its membership, both firsts in the industry.

During his twelve year tenure as CEO, Halvorson not only guided the plan to solid profitability, but added a million members in California, its largest market, despite a devastating recession and a national retreat of commercial HMO membership.  He invested over $6 billion in computerized patient care systems and population health management infrastructure, healed the breach with Kaiser’s physicians, and markedly increased its consumer satisfaction scores, earning 5 STAR ratings under Medicare Advantage.  He left the organization at the end of 2013 with more than $53 billion in revenues and more than $19 billion in reserves and investments.

This interview covers Halvorson’s time at Kaiser, his views of health reform, including the unfinished reform agenda, and his public health activism.  It was conducted by Jeff Goldsmith, a veteran health industry analyst, and Associate Professor of Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia.  Jeff is a member of the editorial board of Health Affairs.

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The Payment Reform Landscape: Value-Oriented Payment Jumps, And Yet …


September 30th, 2014

Today, Catalyst for Payment Reform (CPR) unveiled some potentially exciting news: Our 2014 National Scorecard on Payment Reform tells us 40 percent of commercial sector payments to doctors and hospitals now flow through value-oriented payment methods, defined as payment methods designed to improve quality and reduce waste.  This is a dramatic increase since 2013 when the figure was just 11 percent.

Traditional fee-for-service, where we pay for every test and procedure regardless of its value, may rapidly be becoming a relic.  While the Scorecard findings are not wholly representative of health plans across the United States, they are directionally sound and allow us to measure progress toward value-oriented payment in the commercial sector.  (Scorecard findings are based on data representing almost 65 percent of commercial health plans across the country.)

On the face of it, this is thrilling news for CPR, especially since our organizational goal is that at least 20 percent of payments to doctors and hospitals will flow through methods proven to improve value by the year 2020.  But we are not closing up shop just yet.  The proliferation of value-based payment arrangements only matters if they succeed at reducing costs and improving the quality of care. And for many value-oriented payment models, we still don’t have the evidence.

We also remain a bit circumspect because only about half of the value-oriented payments (out of that 40 percent figure) put providers at some financial risk if they fail to improve care or spend over budget.  To employers and others helping to foot the bill for health care, many new payment methods often feel like “cost plus arrangements.”  Instead, purchasers would like to see risk sharing across payers and providers.

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How Engaging Patients Can Improve Care And Health Outcomes


September 26th, 2014

Patients and caregivers are gaining momentum as powerful new resources in efforts to improve the health care system. They are increasingly becoming active partners in their own care, as well as seeking to make the health care delivery system more responsive to their needs and easier to navigate. And they are increasingly engaging as collaborators in planning and conducting research, and disseminating its results, with the goal of producing evidence that can help patients and those who care for them make better-informed decisions about the clinical choices they face.

It is this last trend that led the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to support Health Affairs in developing a series of videos illustrating some of the ways that patients are bringing their unique experiences and community connections to efforts to improve care for themselves and others. This includes stories of how patients are becoming partners in research designed to address the outcomes important to them, taking account of their own concerns and circumstances.

Seen through this lens, being a research partner goes well beyond being the subject of a trial. Rather, it means helping to guide researchers in formulating the questions to be studied, making the right clinical comparisons, looking at appropriate populations, and focusing on the outcomes important to patients. This should greatly increase the chance that the research findings will produce relevant results that can have a real-world impact — something we plan to evaluate carefully over time.

Meaningful patient engagement is at the heart of PCORI’s approach to research, and several of the patients featured in the videos have in fact partnered with researchers in just this way in patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) studies we fund. They recognize that PCOR, a form of comparative clinical effectiveness research that focuses on issues of concern to patients, is a vital building block for developing truly patient-centered care and health policy, more effective treatments, and better outcomes.

In the following sections, we highlight the projects mentioned in the videos to give you an idea of how patients and community members are partnering in research projects.

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Engaging Patients: Interviews With Patients, Providers, And Communities Across The Country


September 25th, 2014

As the Affordable Care Act (ACA) reaches deeper into the daily lives of Americans, one impact is sure to hit home. The ACA encourages patients and providers to become more active partners in making the crucial strategic decisions over improving individual health. Three new videos, produced in partnership with Health Affairs and the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), show how people all over the United States are learning that involving patients – teaching them, soliciting their input, and communicating with family-members and other caregivers right from the start – can result in better, more efficient health care outcomes.

There is growing evidence that patients, once engaged, take better care of themselves. They’re more likely to monitor their own health, take their medicines, and communicate more thoroughly with their care providers. They have a better understanding of the treatment strategy. And they are more likely to participate in clinical studies or other research to find better, more efficient treatments.

I was privileged to report on and host these videos on the new era of patient engagement. I interviewed nearly two dozen people across the country – patients, doctors, researchers, care-providers, academics and community activists – all of whom have inspiring stories to tell about the benefits of focusing on patient centered outcomes. Time constraints meant that many of their important points landed on the cutting-room floor during the video editing process. It’s another privilege to be able to offer some of those additional insights in this blog.

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Bundled Payments: Do They Put Innovation At Risk?


September 22nd, 2014

While the United States health care system is quickly shifting focus from volume to value, bundled payments have emerged as a promising lever for containing costs and improving quality of care. This model, designed to offset some of the downfalls of traditional fee-for-service payments, reimburses providers based on a predetermined cost of an episode, or group of related services.

The model calls for providers to take on some financial risk while meeting quality standards, especially in areas of well-defined procedures like hip and knee replacements. Now, many are beginning to experiment in other high-cost medical areas, such as behavioral health and oncology.

But what is the impact of bundled payments on medical advancement and innovation? Bundled payments are here to stay, but there remains serious apprehension among innovators adjusting to this evolving landscape. NEHI (Network for Excellence in Health Innovation) brought stakeholders together this July to create a conversation in which experts discussed how bundled payments already have, and will, impact patients’ access to innovation.

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Relative Value Health Insurance And Pay For Performance For Insurers: Complements, Not Substitutes


September 19th, 2014

Background

The quest for value dominates contemporary health policy.  Value, properly defined, is not about cost-savings but about the balance of costs and health benefits — improving the average cost-effectiveness of health interventions.  In choosing which care is funded, insurers are a crucial but commonly neglected driver of health system value.

Insurers can increase health system value by covering fewer cost-ineffective interventions or covering more cost-effective interventions.  Perhaps the earliest attempt to reform insurance, managed care, attempted to pursue both goals, but by the time it was implemented it widely focused (or was perceived to focus) on cost-containment.

A recent insurance reform proposal, known as Relative Value Health Insurance (RVHI), received considerable attention, for instance, in The Upshot, The Incidental Economist, and Forbes.  RVHI enables insurers to reduce their contractual obligation to cover “usual and customary” care.  This and similar earlier proposals rely on the insurers’ natural incentive to cut costs.  Less well-covered, however, are proposals to alter the very incentives of insurers to improve health, which we will call “pay-for-performance-for-insurers” (P4P4I).

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Pediatric Asthma: An Opportunity In Payment Reform And Public Health


September 18th, 2014

Editor’s note: The post is informed by a case study, the third in a series made possible through the Merkin Initiative on Physician Payment Reform and Clinical Leadership, a special project to develop clinician leadership in health care delivery and financing reform. The case study will be presented on Wednesday, September 24 using a “MEDTalk” format featuring live story-telling and knowledge-sharing from patients, providers, and policymakers. 

The Clinical Challenge: A Chronic, but Manageable Illness

Asthma affects 7 million children – more than 10 percent of kids in the U.S. – and is the most common chronic childhood disease. Yet even with high levels of insurance coverage, 46 percent of pediatric patients have uncontrolled asthma. There are substantial gaps in appropriate prescribing and adherence to effective medications. In addition, a multitude of non-medical issues influence a child’s ability to control their asthma: low parental health literacy, poor quality housing, and environmental triggers such as pests, mold, and cleaning chemicals. As a result 800,000 kids visit the emergency department (ED) for asthma each year.

In 2007 (the latest year which data are available) the U.S. spent over $56 billion on asthma care, of which nearly $27 billion was spent on pediatric asthma. Medicaid is the primary payer for pediatric asthma related hospitalizations with 55 percent of the market. Better control may also mean lower medical costs, due to reductions in ED visits, admissions, and other health care utilization – patients with poorly controlled severe asthma cost nearly $5,000 more per patient per year compared to average pediatric asthmatic costs.

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ACOs, Bundled Payment Lead Health Affairs Blog August Most-Read List


September 12th, 2014

Posts on payment and delivery reform head the Health Affairs Blog top-fifteen list for August. Suzanne Delbanco and David Lansky’s post on accountable care organizations was the most-read post, followed by Tom Williams and Jill Yegian’s post on bundled payment, written in response to an article published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

Next is Health Affairs’ Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil’s post on the five engagements that will define the future of health, drawn from his keynote presentation at the 2014 Colorado Health Symposium. This is followed by Rosemarie Day and coauthors’ post on the private health insurance exchange system.

The full list is below.

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The Payment Reform Landscape: Non-Payments


September 4th, 2014

Throughout 2014 here on Health Affairs Blog, I have shared Catalyst for Payment Reform (CPR)’s insights on different types of payment reform, which run along a spectrum of financial risk. We began the year by examining payment models that have “upside only” risk, such as pay-for-performance, which give health care providers the opportunity for financial gain from improving care with no added financial risk.

Then we examined payment models that contain “two-sided risk,” like shared-risk arrangements for ACOs, bundled payment, and capitation with quality, where providers can reap financial gain as well as experience financial losses depending on care outcomes and expenditures.

This month, we examine a model that presents “downside only” risk — non-payment to providers. This payment strategy puts providers at financial risk for care that could or should have been avoided.

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