Blog Home

Archive for the 'Spending' Category




Health Affairs December Briefing: Children’s Health


November 24th, 2014

Threats to children’s health have changed dramatically over the past few generations, but America’s health care system has been slow to transform to meet children’s evolving needs. The December 2014 thematic issue of Health Affairs examines the current state of children’s health, health care delivery, and coverage.

You are invited to join us on Monday, December 8, at a forum featuring authors from the new issue at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.  Panels will cover financing, delivery, access, and the social determinants of children’s health, and spotlight innovative programs that are making a difference.

WHEN: 
Monday, December 8, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE: 
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC, 13th Floor

REGISTER NOW!

Follow live tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_ChildHealth. 

Read the rest of this entry »

Sovaldi, Harvoni, And Why It’s Different This Time


November 21st, 2014

With the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s approval of Harvoni, the successor to Gilead Science’s Sovaldi, the alarm bells have officially rung on breakthrough hepatitis C treatments. One can’t open a newspaper or scan a Twitter feed without stumbling on at least one reference to either of the these two drugs for hepatitis C — an often debilitating viral infection impacting the liver that affects somewhere between 3 to 5 million Americans and several hundred million people worldwide. Hepatitis C infection is often asymptomatic and can have long latency periods. In up to 20 percent of people, chronic infection can lead to liver failure, liver cancer, and potentially liver transplantation.

Gilead Sciences paid $11 billion to acquire the rights to Sovaldi — a drug that offers significant improvement in viral clearance over existing therapies — and launched the drug in the U.S. market at a price ($1,000 per pill, or $84,000 per course of treatment) that is usually reserved for drugs targeting “orphan conditions” for much smaller populations. Not surprisingly, Congress has taken an interest, patient advocacy groups are organizing, the health care community is holding conferences, coalitions are channeling a growing national outrage about the price, and public and private payers are stymied by the challenge of responsibly managing utilization of the drug.

Read the rest of this entry »

Medicare, Medicaid, And Pharmaceuticals: The Price Of Innovation


November 20th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a series of several posts stemming from presentations given at “The Law of Medicare and Medicaid at Fifty,” a conference held at Yale Law School on November 6 and 7.

Through much of the last half century, Medicare and Medicaid (MM) have not for the most part supported research intended to lead to new drugs. For their role in drug development, we need to look to infrastructure and incentives. The record of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) illustrates the potential of both for pharmaceutical innovation. The current budget of NIH, the big elephant in the zoo of the federal biomedical enterprise, is $30 billion, but apart from a dozen small programs devoted to targeted drug development, most of these billions are not aimed directly at pharmaceutical innovation (See page 234).

Yet the NIH investment in biomedicine has indirectly fueled drug development in the private sector to a huge degree. It has paid for the training of biomedical scientists and clinicians, many of whom went on to staff the drug industry, especially its laboratories. NIH-sponsored research has also generated basic knowledge and technologies and it has encouraged universities to spin out their potentially useful findings into the industry by allowing for the patenting and licensing of the findings.

Like NIH, MM has helped fuel drug development indirectly by supporting selected experimental cancer treatments, medical education, and some clinical research and training. But investment in these activities has been small and their impact on drug development apparently very limited. In contrast to NIH, the MM stimulus to drug innovation has resided not in the production of new scientists or the patented uses of new knowledge, but principally in markets and pricing.

Read the rest of this entry »

Analysis Of Medicare Spending Slowdown Leads Health Affairs Blog October Most-Read List


November 17th, 2014

Loren Adler and Adam Rosenberg’s examination of the causes of slower Medicare spending growth was the most-read Health Affairs Blog post in October. Their post was followed by Jeff Goldsmith’s interview with former Kaiser Permanente CEO George Halvorson.

Next on the top-ten list was J. Stephen Morrison’s look at the US response to Ebola and the role of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Tom Frieden, followed by Tim Jost’s post on reference pricing and network adequacy.

The full list is below:

Read the rest of this entry »

Reforming Medicare: What Does The Public Want?


November 13th, 2014

Is Medicare adequately meeting the needs of seniors, or are there ways that its core attributes could be improved? Numerous elected officials, policymakers, and other thought leaders have offered perspectives on ways to change the program. Few efforts, however, have been directed at understanding how the public—given accurate information, a variety of options, and a valid structure for weighing the pros and cons—would change Medicare’s basic design.

The MedCHAT Project

Recently, the American Enterprise Institute and the Brookings Institution co-hosted a briefing on the results of a California project that did just that. The “MedCHAT” project, sponsored by the nonprofit, nonpartisan Center for Healthcare Decisions, asked 800 residents—the lay public, as well as health care professionals and community leaders—to consider Medicare’s current benefits and decide if those should be changed. Respondents represented the full spectrum of age, race, ethnicity, education, and income level.

Using an interactive, computer-based system, participants were asked to respond as “social decisionmakers;” they were tasked with making Medicare more responsive to the needs of current and future generations without imposing a greater cost burden on the country. The computer-based CHAT (“Choosing All Together”) program uses actuarial estimates to show the relative costs of health care benefits, allowing participants to make trade-offs with an understanding of the fiscal impact each benefit has on the program.

Read the rest of this entry »

Yes, We Can Transcend Obamacare


November 6th, 2014

In a recent  Health Affairs Blog post, Washington and Lee University law professor Timothy Jost described a new health-reform plan designed by one of us (Roy) and fiscally modeled by the other (Parente) as a “serious proposal [that] deserves to be taken seriously.” Jost praises parts of the plan. Most notably, he writes that its suggested reform of Medicaid “makes a lot of sense and is similar to proposals made earlier by progressive commentators,” and describes its aim of enacting a uniform annual deductible for Medicare as a “common sense proposal.”

But much of Jost’s review is filled with ideological pique—there are various harrumphs about “nostrums” and “talking points” and “hobby horses.” His article contains some factual and analytical inaccuracies, but also a few good points worth discussing.

Read the rest of this entry »

The $500 Billion Medicare Slowdown: A Story About Part D


October 21st, 2014

A great deal of analysis has been published on the causes of the health care spending slowdown system-wide — including in the pages of Health Affairs. Much attention in particular has focused on the remarkable slowdown in Medicare spending over the past few years, and rightfully so: Spending per beneficiary actually shrank (!) by one percent this year (or grew only one percent if one removes the effects of temporary policy changes).

Yet the disproportionate role played by prescription drug spending (or Part D) has seemingly escaped notice. Despite constituting barely more than 10 percent of Medicare spending, our analysis shows that Part D has accounted for over 60 percent of the slowdown in Medicare benefits since 2011 (beyond the sequestration contained in the 2011 Budget Control Act).

Through April of this year, the last time the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released detailed estimates of Medicare spending, CBO has lowered its projections of total spending on Medicare benefits from 2012 through 2021 by $370 billion, excluding sequestration savings. The $225 billion of that decline accounted for by Part D represents an astounding 24 percent of Part D spending. (By starting in 2011, this analysis excludes the direct impact of various spending reductions in the Affordable Care Act (ACA), although it could still reflect some ACA savings to the extent that the Medicare reforms have controlled costs better than originally anticipated.) Additionally, sequestration is responsible for $75 billion of reduced spending, and increased recoveries of improper payments amount to $85 billion, bringing the total ten-year Medicare savings to $530 billion.

Read the rest of this entry »

Resources Don’t Solve Design Flaws


October 21st, 2014

The first three sessions of a conference I recently attended tackled some complex and important questions: How do we extend health insurance to people such as migrant and informal workers who don’t fit neatly into mainstream coverage programs? As we increase our investment in primary care, how do we assure that the performance of the primary care system is at the highest possible level? What types of evidence should we use as we make decisions in a dynamic health care system with limited opportunities for “gold standard” randomized controlled trials?

These are excellent questions, and they were perfect topics for a cutting-edge conference discussing the challenges facing the U.S. health care system.

But this conference was not about the U.S. health care system. These were opening “satellite” sessions at the Third Global Symposium on Health Systems Research held in Cape Town, South Africa.

Read the rest of this entry »

Slow Health Care Spending Growth Moderates GDP Growth In The Short Term And Policy Targets Should Reflect This


October 16th, 2014

Economic growth is most often measured by growth in gross domestic product (GDP), which is the value of all final goods and services produced in an economy. Recent revisions to the first quarter 2014 estimates of U.S. GDP growth have raised concerns over the extent to which the Affordable Care Act (ACA) might be impacting economic growth.

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) first estimated GDP growth for the first quarter of 2014 to be 0.1 percent on an annualized basis. Then a revised second estimate was made, which indicated a decline in GDP of 1.0 percent on an annualized basis. Finally, on June 25 a second and final revised estimate of a 2.9 percent decrease on an annualized basis was released.

While revisions to initial estimates of GDP growth are not uncommon, one aspect of this second revision was, indeed, uncommon. Nearly two-thirds of the second downward revision (1.2 of the 1.9 percent) was attributed to health care spending being substantially lower in the first quarter of 2014 than was originally forecasted by the BEA.

Read the rest of this entry »

Reminder: Health Affairs Briefing: Specialty Pharmaceuticals


October 3rd, 2014

We live in an era of specialty pharmaceuticals — drugs typically used to treat chronic, serious or life threatening conditions such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, growth hormone deficiency, and multiple sclerosis.  Their cost is often much higher than traditional drugs, and they are set to account for more than half of all drug spending by the end of this decade.

The October 2014 edition of Health Affairs, “Specialty Pharmaceutical Spending and Policy,” contains a cluster of articles examining the host of issues related to specialty pharmaceuticals: from the promise they hold for curing or managing chronic diseases, to the risk they pose for exacerbating health care costs and disparities, and the challenges they present for policymakers striving to balance both.

Please join us on Tuesday, October 7, for a briefing on the October issue moderated by Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil.

WHEN: 
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

WHERE: 
Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC, Lower Level

REGISTER NOW!

Follow Live Tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_SpecialtyDrugs.

Health Affairs is grateful to CVS Health for its financial support of the issue and event.

Read the rest of this entry »

IOM Report Calls For Transformation Of Care For The Seriously Ill


September 24th, 2014

The new Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on care near the end of life in the United States was released last week. I had the privilege of serving on the Committee for the last two years, involved both in the writing of the report itself and in coming to consensus on its recommendations.

The name of the report and the charge to the Committee from the IOM was focused on “end of life.” However, the title, “Dying in America,” is something of a misnomer. The report itself focuses extensively on people with serious and chronic illness with indeterminate prognoses, why the current health care system fails so consistently to meet their needs, and what must change to improve the situation.

Hospice is the gold standard of care quality for those that are predictably dying and clearly at the end of life, and we are fortunate as a nation to have such a strong (mostly home) hospice infrastructure, but that’s not where most of the problems lie. The problems lie in the lack of options for people who are either not hospice-eligible (prognosis uncertain or continuing to want and benefit from disease treatment) or are referred to hospice much too late in their disease course to influence their experience and their families’.

The new report builds on the 1998 IOM report “Approaching Death” and goes well beyond the usual nostrums of calling for reimbursement for advance care planning and decrying all the “waste” in health care spending during the last year of life.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Briefing: Specialty Pharmaceuticals Spending And Policy


September 23rd, 2014

We live in an era of specialty pharmaceuticals — drugs typically used to treat chronic, serious or life threatening conditions such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, growth hormone deficiency, and multiple sclerosis.  Their cost is often much higher than traditional drugs, and they are set to account for more than half of all drug spending by the end of this decade.

The October 2014 edition of Health Affairs, “Specialty Pharmaceutical Spending and Policy,” contains a cluster of articles examining the host of issues related to specialty pharmaceuticals: from the promise they hold for curing or managing chronic diseases, to the risk they pose for exacerbating health care costs and disparities, and the challenges they present for policymakers striving to balance both.

WHEN: 
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

WHERE: 
Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC, Lower Level

REGISTER NOW!

Follow Live Tweets from the briefing @Health_Affairs, and join in the conversation with #HA_SpecialtyDrugs.

Health Affairs is grateful to CVS Health for its financial support of the issue and event.

Read the rest of this entry »

Relative Value Health Insurance And Pay For Performance For Insurers: Complements, Not Substitutes


September 19th, 2014

Background

The quest for value dominates contemporary health policy.  Value, properly defined, is not about cost-savings but about the balance of costs and health benefits — improving the average cost-effectiveness of health interventions.  In choosing which care is funded, insurers are a crucial but commonly neglected driver of health system value.

Insurers can increase health system value by covering fewer cost-ineffective interventions or covering more cost-effective interventions.  Perhaps the earliest attempt to reform insurance, managed care, attempted to pursue both goals, but by the time it was implemented it widely focused (or was perceived to focus) on cost-containment.

A recent insurance reform proposal, known as Relative Value Health Insurance (RVHI), received considerable attention, for instance, in The Upshot, The Incidental Economist, and Forbes.  RVHI enables insurers to reduce their contractual obligation to cover “usual and customary” care.  This and similar earlier proposals rely on the insurers’ natural incentive to cut costs.  Less well-covered, however, are proposals to alter the very incentives of insurers to improve health, which we will call “pay-for-performance-for-insurers” (P4P4I).

Read the rest of this entry »

Reading Piketty In DC: Does Income Inequality Squeeze Health Spending?


September 16th, 2014

In the past year, an element of mystery and suspense has crept quietly into the long-running saga of health care spending growth, in most times a dreary tale of predictability and frustration.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO)’s August forecast of significant reductions in Medicare spending growth in the next decade will help stoke a running debate about whether the spending slowdown that has outlasted the 2008-2010 recession is merely a delayed effect of the slump or a symptom of structural changes with a life of their own.

The mystery and suspense come from month-to-month uncertainties and inscrutable data about which way the trend lines are bending, and why.

Health Spending and Employment

A useful slant on the puzzle is offered in an August Health Affairs analysis by Dave Dranove and colleagues that examines small area variations in spending growth and correlates them with employment data. Dranove et al. found that relatively higher health spending occurred where employment levels were relatively high, and high unemployment translated into less spending on health. So whether it’s copays, deductibles, insurance contributions, or some other cost associated with obtaining care, personal income is a factor in spending levels, just as health costs are a factor in personal income.

Read the rest of this entry »

Examining The Present And Future Of The Health Spending Growth Slowdown


September 3rd, 2014

Each year, Health Affairs publishes national health spending projections for the coming decade by authors at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Office of the Actuary (OACT). The articles provide important documentation of past trends and insight about future spending, using transparent, vetted assumptions.

In this year’s study, Andrea Sisko and coauthors reveal that the recent slowdown in health care spending growth has continued. Specifically, the authors report that national health care spending in 2013 is predicted to have increased by only 3.6 percent — the fifth consecutive year of spending growth below 4 percent. [Editor's note: Health Affairs also publishes annual retrospective health spending reports from OACT -- the journal expects to publish OACT's final numbers for 2013 spending in December.]

When interpreting the data, it is important to distinguish between the spending growth driven by increased spending per beneficiary and growth driven by increases in the number of beneficiaries. This is particularly relevant for Medicare (which is experiencing an influx in baby boomers) and Medicaid (which is experiencing Affordable Care Act (ACA) driven enrollment growth). Certainly, aggregate spending is an important statistic. The budgetary implications of rapid Medicare spending growth due to growth in the number of beneficiaries are similar to the implication of spending growth driven by growth in spending per beneficiary.

Yet the normative interpretation of spending growth will depend dramatically on the cause. We should celebrate aging baby boomers, increases in longevity and wellbeing. Similarly, higher Medicaid enrollment was the intended outcome of the ACA and, at least in many circles, is considered a good thing (relative to growth in the number of uninsured). Of course, such an increase in enrollment creates pressure on public budgets.

Read the rest of this entry »

Projected Slow Growth In 2013 Health Spending Ahead Of Future Increases


September 3rd, 2014

Insurance Coverage, Population Aging, and Economic Growth Are Main Drivers of Projected Future Health Spending Increases

New estimates released today from the Office of the Actuary at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services project a slow 3.6 percent rate of health spending growth for 2013 but also project a 5.6 percent increase in health spending for 2014 and an average 6.0 percent increase for 2015–23. The average rate of projected growth for 2013–23 is 5.7 percent, exceeding the expected average growth in gross domestic product (GDP) by 1.1 percentage points.

Increased insurance coverage via the Affordable Care Act (ACA), projected economic growth, and population aging will be the main contributors of this growth, ultimately leading to an expected 19.3 percent health share of nominal GDP in 2023, up from 17.2 percent in 2012.  This compares to the Office of the Actuary’s 2013  report, published in Health Affairs, predicting an average growth rate of 5.8 percent for 2012–22.

Every year, the Office of the Actuary releases an analysis of how Americans are likely to spend their health care dollars in the coming decade. The new findings appear as a Health Affairs Web First article and will also appear in the journal’s October issue.

Read the rest of this entry »

Transcending Obamacare? Analyzing Avik Roy’s ACA Replacement Plan


September 2nd, 2014

Avik Roy’s proposal, “Transcending Obamacare,” is the latest and most thoroughly developed conservative alternative for reforming the American health care system in the wake of the Affordable Care Act. It is a serious proposal, and it deserves to be taken seriously.

Roy’s proposal is a curious combination of conservative nostrums (limiting recoveries for victims of malpractice), progressive goals (eliminating health status underwriting, providing subsidies for low-income Americans), and common sense proposals (enacting a uniform annual deductible for Medicare).

Most importantly, however, Roy proposes that conservatives move on from a single-minded focus on repealing the ACA toward building upon the ACA to accomplish their policy goals. He supports repealing certain features of the ACA—including the individual and employer mandate—but would retain others, such as community rating and exchanges. As polling repeatedly shows that many Americans are not happy with the ACA, but that a strong majority would rather amend than repeal it, and as it is very possible that we will have a Congress next year less supportive of the ACA than the current one, Roy’s proposal is important.

Read the rest of this entry »

Key Takeaways From The Medicare Trustees’ Report


August 14th, 2014

Depending on which article you read, either the Medicare Trustees think the program is coming to an end, or the news is great and we don’t need to do anything.

The reality is that the recent Trustees’ report contains both positive and sobering news: while costs have been flat for the last two years and growth is expected to moderate for some years to come, Medicare’s financing is still not in good shape over the long run. Current law benefits exceed financing to pay for them, and the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund will be unable to pay full benefits in 2030.

We cannot assume the problem will resolve itself, and action is needed to ensure the program’s stability.  Moreover, health care remains a substantial portion of the national budget – a whopping 25 percent — and addressing federal fiscal imbalances must include health programs.

Below we provide our key takeaways from this year’s Trustees’ report.

Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs August Issue: Variations In Health Care


August 4th, 2014

Health AffairsAugust variety issue includes a number of studies demonstrating variations in health and health care, such as differing obstetrical complication rates and disparities in care for diabetes. Other subjects in the issue include the impact of ACA coverage on young adults’ out-of-pocket costs; and how price transparency may help lower health care costs.

For mothers-to-be, huge differences in delivery complication rates among hospitals.

Four million women give birth each year in the United States. While the reported incidence of maternal pregnancy-related mortality is low (14.5 per 100,000 live births), the rate of obstetric complications is nearly 13 percent.

Laurent Glance of the University of Rochester and coauthors analyzed data for 750,000 obstetrical deliveries in 2010 from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization’s Nationwide Inpatient Sample. They found that women delivering vaginally at low-performing hospitals had twice the rate of any major complications (22.55 percent) compared to vaginal deliveries at high-performing hospitals (10.42 percent

Read the rest of this entry »

The Medicaid Boom And State Budgets: How Federal Waivers Are Advancing State Flexibility


July 18th, 2014

Note: The authors would like to thank Erica Socker, Senior Research Associate, and Michelle Shaljian, Associate Director of Communications, for their review and editorial assistance.

According to data released by the Department of Health and Human Services, one in five Americans now receive their health insurance through a state Medicaid program. Despite this increase in enrollment, it is estimated that 6 million Americans will likely remain uninsured because 20 states have decided not to expand Medicaid as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) envisioned. There are at least four states that are considering expanding Medicaid but have yet to do so.

Medicaid expansion continues to be one of the most politically charged directives of the health care law, mainly because the Supreme Court decision left the choice to states. This decision has generated an ongoing debate about whether and how states should expand their Medicaid programs. For example, an intense debate has been underway in Virginia, over the decision to include Medicaid expansion in the state budget; putting Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe at odds with the Republican State Legislature. Similar debates are occurring in states across the country, and are further complicated by states’ option to pursue alternative expansion approaches under a Medicaid waiver. For states that have not yet expanded the program, the success of these alternative expansion models may influence whether they can find a politically feasible path forward.

Read the rest of this entry »

Click here to email us a new post.