From The Staff

Five Engagements That Will Define The Future Of Health


July 31st, 2014

I recently had the pleasure of opening and moderating the first day of the 2014 Colorado Health Symposium, which had as its theme “Transforming Health: The Power of Engagement.”  I found thinking about engagement, well, engaging, and in this post I summarize the keynote presentation I gave at the conference.

Engagement has many meanings, including some negative ones (such as “a hostile encounter between military forces”).  I focused on engagement as “emotional involvement or commitment” and described five engagements that will define the future of health. Read the rest of this entry »

Exhibit Of The Month: A Big Data Understanding Of Health Care Trends


July 30th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Month” series. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month we look at two exhibits from “Four Health Data Networks Illustrate The Potential For A Shared National Multipurpose Big-Data Network,” published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

These exhibits demonstrate how the effects of expanding health data availability and processing have the potential to dramatically alter our understanding of trends in the health care environment.

Emerging programs, such as the Food and Drug Administration’s Mini-Sentinel presented here, collect data from disparate and otherwise uncoordinated sources, which can also be made available for research purposes. Programs such as Mini-Sentinel are able to layer data, in this case from health care provider data from a single period, but collected over time: Read the rest of this entry »

Recent Health Policy Brief: Site Neutral Payments


July 28th, 2014

A new Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) describes the different proposals designed to eliminate differences in Medicare’s payment systems that depend on where care and services are delivered. Currently, services that can be provided in a variety of clinical settings may sometimes be paid for at dramatically different payment rates.

Recently, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Medicare Payment Advisory Committee (MedPAC) proposed eliminating this differential payment for certain services. This brief explains the origin of these differential payments and the debate over approaches that have been proposed for developing so called “site neutral” payments.

Topics covered in this brief include: Read the rest of this entry »

Health Policy Brief Updates


July 22nd, 2014

In the first half of 2014 Health Affairs has released seven new Health Policy Briefs and also has provided updates of five previously released briefs, in order to reflect continuously changing and evolving health policy issues and perspectives.

The following Health Policy Briefs were updated in 2014: Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


July 21st, 2014

Over at Wing of Zock, Jennifer Salopek offers some fresh thoughts in her “Polar Vortex” Health Wonk Review. Jennifer highlights Health Affairs Blog posts on the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision by Tim Jost, John Kraemer, and Sara Rosenbaum and coauthors, as well as a slew of other great posts.  Read the rest of this entry »

Narrative Matters: A Chronic Pain Sufferer Navigates The Maze Of Opioid Use


July 17th, 2014

In the July Health Affairs Narrative Matters essay, a woman living with chronic pain tries to manage her condition while maneuvering through the maze of opioid medications. Janice Lynch Schuster’s article is freely available to all readers, or you can listen to the podcast. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: More US RNs Retire Later, Causing A Larger Workforce


July 16th, 2014

The size of the registered nurse (RN) workforce has surpassed forecasts from a decade ago, growing to 2.7 million in 2012 instead of peaking at 2.2 million as predicted. One less-noticed factor in this “nursing boom” is the decision by a growing number of RNs to delay retirement.

According to a new study being released today as a Web First by Health Affairs, among registered nurses working at the age of fifty from 1991 to 2012, 24 percent continued working as of the age of sixty-nine. This compared to 9 percent of RNs still working at the age of sixty-nine in the period from 1969 to 1990.

Authors David Auerbach, Peter Buerhaus, and Douglas Staiger also found that as RNs tend to shift out of hospital settings as they age, employers may welcome the growing numbers of experienced RNs seeking employment in other settings. Auerbach is affiliated with the RAND Corp. in Boston, Massachusetts; Buerhaus with Vanderbilt University’s Institute of Medicine and Public Health in Nashville, Tennessee; and Staiger with Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Read the rest of this entry »

ACO Results And Treating Hepatitis C Most-Read Health Affairs Blog Posts For June


July 15th, 2014

In June, Matthew Petersen and David Muhlestein’s post on the cost and quality implications of the accountable care organization (ACO) model on the health care system was the most-read Health Affairs Blog post. Not too far behind was a post on Medicare’s role in treating Hepatitis C from Tricia Neuman, Jack Hoadley, and Juliette Cubanski.

Next was Tim Jost’s examination of the employer mandate and why it should be repealed and replaced, followed by Jon Gabel’s response to a Health Affairs Web First on cancelled non-group plans.

Here’s the full list: Read the rest of this entry »

Recent Health Policy Brief: E-Cigarettes And Federal Regulation


July 11th, 2014

The latest Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) describes federal policy makers’ recent efforts to propose rules for e-cigarette regulation. E-cigarettes, virtually non-existent ten years ago, have skyrocketed in popularity, including among people who claim to use e-cigarettes as a tool to help them quit smoking altogether.

The 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act gave the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authority to oversee the manufacture, marketing, distribution, and sale of regulated tobacco products such as cigarettes, tobacco in cigarettes, roll-your-own, and smokeless tobacco. But it left unregulated other tobacco products such as cigars, pipe and hookah tobacco, nicotine gels, and e-cigarettes. Read the rest of this entry »

Interview: IOM President Harvey Fineberg Reflects On Lessons Learned


July 10th, 2014

On June 16, 2014, I spoke with Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg, as he wrapped up his second six-year term as president of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). We discussed how requests for work come to the IOM, the attributes of IOM reports that make them effective, and how the IOM maintains a strong voice in a crowded field.

Dr. Fineberg shared lessons learned from his analysis of events surrounding the Swine Flu immunization effort of 1976, and how, today, those lessons help him guide the IOM’s thinking about program assessment. We also discussed Dr. Fineberg’s work to bring together the various arms of the National Academies of Sciences to improve health.

You can listen to the full podcast at Health Affairs. These are a few of my favorite quotations taken from our discussion: Read the rest of this entry »

Contributing Voices

The Role Of Black Box Warnings In Safe Prescribing Practices


August 20th, 2014

In the Health Affairs article, “Era of Faster Drug Approval Has Also Seen Increased Black-Box Warnings and Market Withdrawals,” published in the August issue, Cassie Frank and coauthors compare the number of approved prescription drugs that received black-box warnings or were withdrawn from the market for safety-related reasons prior to the 1992 Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) with black-box warnings and safety-related withdrawals in the post-PDUFA era.

PDUFA for the first time authorized FDA to collect user fees from brand-name manufacturers that submitted New Drug Applications, with the funds being earmarked for more review staff (not until 2007 were funds also permitted to be used to expand post-approval safety surveillance capacity).

As a quid pro quo, the FDA was required to act on all new drugs within a fixed deadline: drugs given priority review designations because they were particularly promising therapies offering substantial improvements in treating serious conditions were to be reviewed within 6 months and standard review drugs were to be reviewed within 12 months (later shortened to 10 months in 2002). By all accounts, PDUFA substantially expedited the review process. The review times for new molecular entities decreased from an average of 33.6 months between 1978 and 1986 to about 10 months for drugs approved between 2001-2010. Read the rest of this entry »

Whither CHIP?


August 19th, 2014

In a day all but lost to Affordable Care Act prehistory, on November 7, 2009, the House of Representatives passed the Affordable Health Care for America Act. Among the bill’s many differences with its Senate counterpart, it would have allowed the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to expire at the end of 2013, with children covered under that program enrolled in either Medicaid or commercial Exchange plans.

On December 24, the Senate passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Their bill extended CHIP through fiscal year 2015 while, curiously, enhancing the Federal match rate for the program beyond that date and instituting a maintenance of effort (MOE) requirement for states to keep CHIP kids covered through 2019.

At the time, drafters of the respective chamber’s versions of health reform anticipated heading to conference to negotiate and resolve their differences, with the disposition of CHIP one of the top considerations. Read the rest of this entry »

It’s Hard To Be Neutral About Network Neutrality For Health


August 18th, 2014

Network Neutrality (NN) has been in the news because the FCC is considering two options related to a neutral Internet: either regulation forcing NN, or an approach that creates a “fast lane” on the Internet for those content providers that are willing to pay extra for it.

Network Neutrality reflects a vision of a network in which users are able to exchange and consume data, as they choose, without the interference of the organization providing the network basic data transport services. The second option, preferential service, entertains the possibility that the Internet could become what the National Journal describes as “a dystopia run by the world’s biggest, richest companies.”

However, the problem of network neutrality is more complex. Full network neutrality could also lead to a tragedy of the commons in which application developers compete for the use of “free” bandwidth for services to win customers while clogging networks and lowering performance for all. Key stakeholders providing basic transport Internet service such as Comcast, Verizon, or AT&T, and large Internet savvy content providers like Google have a clear understanding of the debate and what they stand to gain or lose from network neutrality. Read the rest of this entry »

Spokane County: A Community Comes Together To Improve Health And Education For Every Child


August 18th, 2014

Editor’s Note: This post is part of an ongoing series written for Health Affairs Blog by local leaders from communities honored with the annual Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Prize. In 2014, six winning communities were selected by RWJF from more than 250 applicants and celebrated for placing a priority on health and creating powerful partnerships to drive change. Interested communities are encouraged to apply for the 2015 RWJF Culture of Health Prize. Applications are due September 17, 2014.

Spokane County is a metro area of more than 470,000 people, yet it’s still driven by the spirit of a small town. That sense of community is an essential part of the county’s ongoing work to improve the health of all residents by focusing on education.

In 2006, Spokane Public Schools’ high school graduation rate was less than 60 percent overall, while Spokane County’s rate was 72.9 percent. Spokane County educators were increasingly concerned about the future health and well-being of the county’s children, especially the 18 percent living in poverty. Read the rest of this entry »

Remembering Jessie Gruman


August 15th, 2014

Jessie Gruman, founding president of the Center for Advancing Health, died on July 14 after a fifth bout with cancer. Jessie was a hero to patients, families, and health care providers for her selfless work to help people better understand their role and responsibilities in supporting their own health.

Jessie was an extraordinary soul and a pioneering activist in the person-centered care movement. She used her personal experience with illness to inspire a life’s work aimed at developing practical resources that support peoples’ engagement with their health care. She improved care and improved lives.

Jessie was first diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty. She was thrown into a world that spoke in a foreign tongue: “medicalese.” She was expected to self-administer a complex medication regime, which she openly admits she sometimes skipped. Jessie described the hard-working health care professionals who fought to make her better all relying on her, a scared twenty-year-old, to understand what they said and implement their plan. She realized the enormous power of people who are engaged in their own health, while also recognizing the challenges to such engagement. Read the rest of this entry »

Hospital Readmission Reduction Program Reignites Debate Over Risk Adjusting Quality Measures


August 14th, 2014

Do safety net hospitals categorically under perform the national average in terms of managing readmissions? Or is something else triggering higher rates of readmissions in these facilities?  These questions are essential for policymakers to answer as pay-for-performance (P4P) penalties are having a disparate impact on hospitals that serve low-income areas.

Medicare’s Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP), for example,  links risk-adjusted hospital readmission rates to financial penalties. Hospitals with risk-adjusted readmission rates that fall below the national average are penalized by having their annual Medicare payments reduced by up to 2 percent. In 2015, hospital payments are scheduled to be reduced by up to 3 percent.

But the program’s current system for measuring readmission rates may be flawed. Numerous analyses have found that safety net hospitals, which care for low-income patients, are more than twice as likely to be penalized than hospitals caring for higher-income patients. Read the rest of this entry »

Key Takeaways From The Medicare Trustees’ Report


August 14th, 2014

Depending on which article you read, either the Medicare Trustees think the program is coming to an end, or the news is great and we don’t need to do anything.

The reality is that the recent Trustees’ report contains both positive and sobering news: while costs have been flat for the last two years and growth is expected to moderate for some years to come, Medicare’s financing is still not in good shape over the long run. Current law benefits exceed financing to pay for them, and the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund will be unable to pay full benefits in 2030.

We cannot assume the problem will resolve itself, and action is needed to ensure the program’s stability.  Moreover, health care remains a substantial portion of the national budget – a whopping 25 percent — and addressing federal fiscal imbalances must include health programs.

Below we provide our key takeaways from this year’s Trustees’ report. Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: ACA-Related Litigation, Special Enrollment Periods, And Navigator Certification And Training (Updated)


August 13th, 2014

Update, August 17, 2014: Navigator, non-navigator assister, and certified application trainer certification and training. Navigator grants for 2013-2014 expired on August 14, 2014.  Grant awards for 2014 will not be announced until September 8, 2014.  In the interim, consumers continue to need assistance with signing up for special enrollment periods and for sorting out ongoing issues with the marketplaces.  Navigators and certified application counselors (CACs) must also be trained and certified for 2015. On August 15, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued a bulletin outlining certification and training requirements for navigators, non-navigator assisters, and CACs for 2015, as well as provisions for interim navigator certification of the fall of 2014.

CMS regulations require all navigators in the federally facilitated marketplace to obtain continuing education and to be recertified on at least an annual basis.  Navigators are certified by CMS.  Navigators who completed training during the 2013-2014 grant period were certified through August 14, 2014.  Some navigator programs received a no-cost extension of their 2013 grant.  (A no-cost extension is “a noncompetitive extension of time to the final budget period of a competitive segment, without additional Federal funds, to complete the work under a grant or avoid a hiatus while a competing continuation application is under consideration.”) CMS will issue provisional certificates lasting from August 14 to November 15, 2014, to eligible staff of no-cost-extension navigator programs who wish to continue to carry out navigator functions.  Provisionally certified staff must complete 2015 training by November 15 to remain certified, but are encouraged to complete it sooner.

Navigators with new navigator programs must complete the 2015 navigator training program before they can begin assisting consumers.  Individual navigators with 2013 programs that did not receive a no-cost extensions must cease providing services as of August 14, 2014.  They may not begin providing services until they complete navigator training and are certified for 2015, and then only if their program receives a 2014-2015 program grant. Read the rest of this entry »

The Evolution Of A Two-Tier Health Insurance Exchange System


August 13th, 2014

Health reform has been a catalyst for change. It has fostered the creation of public health insurance exchanges and accelerated existing trends in health insurance coverage for employees. Many employers are reevaluating their coverage offerings, some employers are no longer providing insurance coverage, and, among those who continue to offer it, high deductible plans with restricted networks are becoming the norm.

In addition, employers are increasingly outsourcing health insurance benefits management by moving employees to private health insurance exchanges – often in combination with a shift toward a defined contribution approach. Estimates vary, but surveys show that anywhere from 9 to 45 percent of employers plan to implement private exchanges in the future.

Accenture (see Figure 1) has predicted that by 2018, private exchange enrollment will outpace public exchange enrollment. Read the rest of this entry »

Better Measurement Of Maternity Care Quality


August 12th, 2014

A thought-provoking paper published this month in Health Affairs shows stunning variation in rates of obstetrical complications across U.S. hospitals. This type of research is important and necessary because focusing on averages masks potentially large differences in how patient care is provided and how clinical decisions are made.

From a policy perspective, it’s crucial to identify and learn from hospitals that are “positive deviants,” that is – hospitals with better-than-expected quality of care. From a pregnant woman’s perspective, having information on hospital rates of hemorrhage, infection, or laceration during childbirth is a high priority.

Authors Laurent Glance and colleagues add to a growing literature on variation in hospital-based maternity care. Having useful quality measurement and reporting strategies to guide policy and patient decisions is an essential next step. Indeed, Glance and colleagues conclude by urging clinicians and policymakers to “develop comprehensive quality metrics for obstetrical care and focus on improving obstetrical outcomes.” Read the rest of this entry »

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