From The Staff

Five Engagements That Will Define The Future Of Health


July 31st, 2014

I recently had the pleasure of opening and moderating the first day of the 2014 Colorado Health Symposium, which had as its theme “Transforming Health: The Power of Engagement.”  I found thinking about engagement, well, engaging, and in this post I summarize the keynote presentation I gave at the conference.

Engagement has many meanings, including some negative ones (such as “a hostile encounter between military forces”).  I focused on engagement as “emotional involvement or commitment” and described five engagements that will define the future of health. Read the rest of this entry »

Exhibit Of The Month: A Big Data Understanding Of Health Care Trends


July 30th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Month” series. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month we look at two exhibits from “Four Health Data Networks Illustrate The Potential For A Shared National Multipurpose Big-Data Network,” published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

These exhibits demonstrate how the effects of expanding health data availability and processing have the potential to dramatically alter our understanding of trends in the health care environment.

Emerging programs, such as the Food and Drug Administration’s Mini-Sentinel presented here, collect data from disparate and otherwise uncoordinated sources, which can also be made available for research purposes. Programs such as Mini-Sentinel are able to layer data, in this case from health care provider data from a single period, but collected over time: Read the rest of this entry »

Recent Health Policy Brief: Site Neutral Payments


July 28th, 2014

A new Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) describes the different proposals designed to eliminate differences in Medicare’s payment systems that depend on where care and services are delivered. Currently, services that can be provided in a variety of clinical settings may sometimes be paid for at dramatically different payment rates.

Recently, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Medicare Payment Advisory Committee (MedPAC) proposed eliminating this differential payment for certain services. This brief explains the origin of these differential payments and the debate over approaches that have been proposed for developing so called “site neutral” payments.

Topics covered in this brief include: Read the rest of this entry »

Health Policy Brief Updates


July 22nd, 2014

In the first half of 2014 Health Affairs has released seven new Health Policy Briefs and also has provided updates of five previously released briefs, in order to reflect continuously changing and evolving health policy issues and perspectives.

The following Health Policy Briefs were updated in 2014: Read the rest of this entry »

The Latest Health Wonk Review


July 21st, 2014

Over at Wing of Zock, Jennifer Salopek offers some fresh thoughts in her “Polar Vortex” Health Wonk Review. Jennifer highlights Health Affairs Blog posts on the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision by Tim Jost, John Kraemer, and Sara Rosenbaum and coauthors, as well as a slew of other great posts.  Read the rest of this entry »

Narrative Matters: A Chronic Pain Sufferer Navigates The Maze Of Opioid Use


July 17th, 2014

In the July Health Affairs Narrative Matters essay, a woman living with chronic pain tries to manage her condition while maneuvering through the maze of opioid medications. Janice Lynch Schuster’s article is freely available to all readers, or you can listen to the podcast. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: More US RNs Retire Later, Causing A Larger Workforce


July 16th, 2014

The size of the registered nurse (RN) workforce has surpassed forecasts from a decade ago, growing to 2.7 million in 2012 instead of peaking at 2.2 million as predicted. One less-noticed factor in this “nursing boom” is the decision by a growing number of RNs to delay retirement.

According to a new study being released today as a Web First by Health Affairs, among registered nurses working at the age of fifty from 1991 to 2012, 24 percent continued working as of the age of sixty-nine. This compared to 9 percent of RNs still working at the age of sixty-nine in the period from 1969 to 1990.

Authors David Auerbach, Peter Buerhaus, and Douglas Staiger also found that as RNs tend to shift out of hospital settings as they age, employers may welcome the growing numbers of experienced RNs seeking employment in other settings. Auerbach is affiliated with the RAND Corp. in Boston, Massachusetts; Buerhaus with Vanderbilt University’s Institute of Medicine and Public Health in Nashville, Tennessee; and Staiger with Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Read the rest of this entry »

ACO Results And Treating Hepatitis C Most-Read Health Affairs Blog Posts For June


July 15th, 2014

In June, Matthew Petersen and David Muhlestein’s post on the cost and quality implications of the accountable care organization (ACO) model on the health care system was the most-read Health Affairs Blog post. Not too far behind was a post on Medicare’s role in treating Hepatitis C from Tricia Neuman, Jack Hoadley, and Juliette Cubanski.

Next was Tim Jost’s examination of the employer mandate and why it should be repealed and replaced, followed by Jon Gabel’s response to a Health Affairs Web First on cancelled non-group plans.

Here’s the full list: Read the rest of this entry »

Recent Health Policy Brief: E-Cigarettes And Federal Regulation


July 11th, 2014

The latest Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) describes federal policy makers’ recent efforts to propose rules for e-cigarette regulation. E-cigarettes, virtually non-existent ten years ago, have skyrocketed in popularity, including among people who claim to use e-cigarettes as a tool to help them quit smoking altogether.

The 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act gave the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authority to oversee the manufacture, marketing, distribution, and sale of regulated tobacco products such as cigarettes, tobacco in cigarettes, roll-your-own, and smokeless tobacco. But it left unregulated other tobacco products such as cigars, pipe and hookah tobacco, nicotine gels, and e-cigarettes. Read the rest of this entry »

Interview: IOM President Harvey Fineberg Reflects On Lessons Learned


July 10th, 2014

On June 16, 2014, I spoke with Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg, as he wrapped up his second six-year term as president of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). We discussed how requests for work come to the IOM, the attributes of IOM reports that make them effective, and how the IOM maintains a strong voice in a crowded field.

Dr. Fineberg shared lessons learned from his analysis of events surrounding the Swine Flu immunization effort of 1976, and how, today, those lessons help him guide the IOM’s thinking about program assessment. We also discussed Dr. Fineberg’s work to bring together the various arms of the National Academies of Sciences to improve health.

You can listen to the full podcast at Health Affairs. These are a few of my favorite quotations taken from our discussion: Read the rest of this entry »

Contributing Voices

Transcending Obamacare? Analyzing Avik Roy’s ACA Replacement Plan


September 2nd, 2014

Avik Roy’s proposal, “Transcending Obamacare,” is the latest and most thoroughly developed conservative alternative for reforming the American health care system in the wake of the Affordable Care Act. It is a serious proposal, and it deserves to be taken seriously.

Roy’s proposal is a curious combination of conservative nostrums (limiting recoveries for victims of malpractice), progressive goals (eliminating health status underwriting, providing subsidies for low-income Americans), and common sense proposals (enacting a uniform annual deductible for Medicare).

Most importantly, however, Roy proposes that conservatives move on from a single-minded focus on repealing the ACA toward building upon the ACA to accomplish their policy goals. He supports repealing certain features of the ACA—including the individual and employer mandate—but would retain others, such as community rating and exchanges. As polling repeatedly shows that many Americans are not happy with the ACA, but that a strong majority would rather amend than repeal it, and as it is very possible that we will have a Congress next year less supportive of the ACA than the current one, Roy’s proposal is important. Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Tax Form Instructions


August 29th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post has been updated to include several corrections of errors in the original post with respect to the instructions on the forms 1094-C and 1095-C. The author wishes to thank Linda Mendel of Vorys, Sater, Seymour, and Pease for calling them to his attention.

On August 28, 2014, the Internal Revenue Service re-released the draft forms that will be used by employer, insurers, and exchanges for reporting Affordable Care Act tax information to individuals and to the IRS for 2014 and 2015, as well as the instructions for completing those forms.  The IRS also released in the Federal Register requests for public comments on three of those forms — the 1094-Bthe 1094-C, and the 1095-C — under the Paperwork Reduction Act.  This post reports on these forms and instructions and on a guidance released by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The tax forms had been published earlier and are described in an earlier post.  The instructions for the forms, however, had not been available and had been eagerly awaited by employers, insurers, exchanges, and tax professionals. Forms 1094-C and 1095-C will be used by large employers with more than 50 full-time or full-time-equivalent employees to determine whether the employer is responsible for penalties under the employer shared responsibility requirements of the ACA.  They will also be used to determine whether employees have received an affordable and adequate offer of coverage, rendering them ineligible for premium tax credits.  Employers are required to provide each full-time employee with a form 1095-C and to file each of these together with a transmittal form 1095-B form with the IRS.

The instructions for the 1094-C and 1095-C are by far the most complex of the instructions released on August 28, filling 13 pages with dense, two column, print.  Most of the complexity derives from the options for complying with the employer mandate and the transition exceptions to that mandate that the administration has created.  These alternatives and exceptions were explored in my posts on the employer mandate final rule when it was issued in February, 2014.  These forms are also complicated by the fact that the IRS decided to allow self-insured large employers to file only the large employer 1094-C and 1095-C, rather than requiring them to also fill out the 1094-B and 1095-B forms, which are filed by other entities that provide minimum essential coverage.  Because the employer mandate has been delayed, large employers are not required to file these forms for 2014, although they may do so voluntarily. Read the rest of this entry »

Collaboration, Consistency, and Community Spirit: How Durham Advances Health


August 28th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing series written for Health Affairs Blog by local leaders from communities honored with the annual Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Prize. In 2014, six winning communities were selected by RWJF from more than 250 applicants and celebrated for placing a priority on health and creating powerful partnerships to drive change. Interested communities are encouraged to apply for the 2015 RWJF Culture of Health Prize. Applications are due September 17, 2014.

Durham, North Carolina is so richly endowed with health care resources that it is known as “the City of Medicine;” it is home to 95 percent of the companies that comprise the Research Triangle. Yet, while many of the county’s 288,133 residents are thriving, others are not nearly as healthy.

A 2004 community health assessment revealed that in Durham’s very diverse population — currently, 38.7 percent black, 42.1 percent white, and 13.5 percent Hispanic — there were high rates of cardiovascular disease and other chronic conditions, HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, and infant mortality.

A 2007 evaluation also showed that 29 percent of the county’s adults were obese. The rate was 42 percent among African Americans. In the same report, 49 percent of adults said their health prevented them from participating in even moderate physical activities. Among children entering kindergarten in 2009, 18 percent were overweight or obese. Read the rest of this entry »

The Winding Path To Effective Bundled Payment


August 28th, 2014

Tom Williams and Jill Yegian’s excellent blog post makes a great companion to our recent paper on the evaluation of the Integrated Healthcare Association (IHA) Bundled Payment Demonstration. Williams and Yegian offer lessons from their experience implementing a demonstration project that failed to meet its original objectives. This type of analysis is essential.

It’s not unusual for a demonstration to fall short of its original objectives. Learning from such cases is part of the innovation process. This is especially worthwhile for bundled payment, which has many potential benefits for patients, providers, and payers.

None of the barriers encountered in IHA’s demonstration signal a “death sentence” for bundled payment. However, the demonstration clearly shows that bundled payment is difficult to implement. Read the rest of this entry »

State-Based Marketplaces: Leveraging Year-One Lessons To Boost Year-Two Enrollment


August 27th, 2014

In three months, consumers will log onto their state’s health insurance marketplace to investigate their options and enroll in a plan. Already, states are hard at work prepping for the second year of open enrollment, which begins November 15. State marketplaces are expected to increase the number of enrollees this year and adopting lessons from 2013-2014 can help.

A User-Friendly Marketplace

First and foremost, states need a user-friendly marketplace that functions properly and allows consumers, brokers, insurers and navigators to seek and provide information that is timely and credible. States know this, but recently, interviews with 100 staff from five successful state-based marketplaces (SBMs) unearthed several less obvious lessons.

To begin, states should move from last year’s ‘shotgun’ marketing that helped build awareness to a more targeted approach to outreach this year. In addition to some mass marketing to maintain awareness, states should target advertising dollars to high-priority segments and focus on less expensive tools, like direct mailing campaigns and walk-up enrollment centers, which proved to be most effective last year. Read the rest of this entry »

Rescue Me: The Challenge Of Compassionate Use In The Social Media Era


August 27th, 2014

The Development of Brincidofovir And Its Possible Use To Treat Josh Hardy

Last March 4, seven-year old Josh Hardy lay critically ill in the intensive care unit at St Jude Children’s Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee with a life-threatening adenovirus infection. His weakened immune system was unable to control the infection, a complication of a bone marrow stem cell transplant he needed as a result of treatments for several different cancers since he was 9 months old.

His physicians tried to treat the adenovirus with an anti-viral agent, Vistide (IV cidofovir), but had to stop due to dialysis-dependent renal failure. They were aware of another anti-viral in Phase 3 clinical development, brincidofovir, an oral compound chemically related to Vistide. In earlier clinical testing brincidofovir had shown the potential for enhanced antiviral potency and a more favorable safety profile.

Chimerix (where one of us, Moch, was CEO), a 55 person North Carolina-based biopharmaceutical company, had previously made brincidofovir available to more than 430 critically ill patients in an expanded access program for the treatment of serious or life-threatening DNA viral infections, including adenovirus as well as herpes viruses (such as cytomegalovirus) and polyomaviruses.  This program started in 2009 as a series of individual physician-sponsored emergency INDs — investigational new drug exemptions issued in physician-certified compassionate use situations.

The program evolved via word of mouth to the extent that brincidofovir was made available under emergency INDs for more than 215 patients. During 2011, Chimerix received funding from Health and Human Service’s Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) to provide brincidofovir to an additional 215 critically ill patients for the purpose of gaining insights into the potential use of brincidofovir as a medical countermeasure against smallpox. (Department of Health and Human Services Contract No. HHSO100201100013C.  For further information on brincidofovir Study CMX001-350, see ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01143181.)

When BARDA funding ended in 2012, Chimerix stopped accepting new requests for compassionate use under its expanded access program. Although requests continued from physicians around the world, the company decided that it was in the best interests of the greatest number of patients to devote its limited human and financial resources to the clinical development pathway necessary for FDA approval of brincidofovir.

This post examines the implications of the ultimately successful campaign waged by Josh Hardy’s family to obtain access to brincidofovir for their son. We discuss several issues raised by the Hardy case, including the overarching question of whether it is fair for social media or influence of any form to play a role in determining which patients get access to experimental treatments; whether rescuing individual patients in need can be reconciled with an evidence-based regulatory approval process for new therapies; and whether there is a duty to “rescue” terminally ill patients by paying for access to experimental therapies.

Finally, we propose a new framework for regulating access to experimental treatments. Read the rest of this entry »

The 125 Percent Solution: Fixing Variations In Health Care Prices


August 26th, 2014

Summer vacation’s finally here. You’re strolling along the beach, not a care in the world when – ouch – you step on a piece of broken glass and need a few stitches at the local hospital. Such routine procedures are painless enough, but depending on where you’re treated and by whom, the real pain could occur when you’re handed the ER bill.

In some of the latest evidence on the crazy-quilt patterns of U.S. health care prices, Castlight Health found prices in Dallas TX ranging from $15 to $343 for the same cholesterol test.  What makes these price variations particularly egregious is that the highest prices are typically reserved for those least able to pay, such as the uninsured.

What’s the solution?  In the long run, we need to establish a more transparent system where consumers can choose easily based on reliable quality and price measures.  But our current measures of quality are, to put it politely, inadequate, and people with insurance are often insulated or can generally afford those higher prices.  Reference pricing, in which insurance pays only enough to reimburse providers with adequate quality and relatively lower costs, would help to restrain high prices, but distracted patients or those with strong attachments to specific doctors or hospitals could still get stung with a big bill.

Capping Payments At 125 percent Of Medicare Rates

We suggest a short-term solution: The federal Medicare program has in place a complete system of prices for every procedure and treatment.  It’s not perfect, but it is uniform across regions, with a cost-of-living adjustment that pays more in expensive cities and less in rural areas.  If every patient and every insurance company always had the option of paying 125 percent of the Medicare price for any service, we would effectively cap the worst of the price spikes.  No longer would the tourist checked out at the ER for heat stroke be clobbered with a sky-high bill.  Nor would the uninsured single mother be charged 10 times the best price for her child’s asthma care.  This is not just another government regulation, but instead a protection plan that shields consumers from excessive market power. Read the rest of this entry »

Arkansas Payment Improvement Initiative: The First Year


August 25th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of a periodic Health Affairs Blog series, which will run over the next year, looking at payment and delivery reforms in Arkansas and Oregon. The posts will be based on evaluations of these reforms performed with the support of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The authors of this post are part of the team evaluating the Arkansas model.

Arkansas payers and providers actively participated in the design of both the episodic payment and patient-centered medical home (PCMH) models the state has recently implemented. We’ve written about each of these components of the multi-payer Arkansas Payment Improvement Initiative (APII) in our previous Health Affairs Blog posts.

The state’s fragmented and largely rural provider environment presents an important test for a novel episodic payment model that may, if successful, have broader applicability in other states sharing a similar health care landscape. Fourteen episodes have now been launched and provider participation is mandatory. While our first posting goes into greater detail on the nuances of Arkansas’ approach to episodes, we provide the following brief summary here to add context to this discussion. Read the rest of this entry »

Partnership And Progress On The Path To Achieving Millennium Development Goal 6


August 25th, 2014

Editor’s note: For more on global health, stay tuned for the upcoming September issue of Health Affairs.

In 2000, nearly 200 world leaders came together and agreed on a set of objectives intended to tackle some of the most pressing development challenges of our time, such as poverty, AIDS, and child mortality. With a target date of December 31, 2015, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) provided a clear path for progress and a platform for immediate action. Last week, on August 18, we reached a milestone on that path – as of that date, 500 days remained to achieve these eight goals. So where do we stand, and what more must be done?

Combatting HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Other Diseases

For those of us focused acutely on MDG number 6—combatting HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases—the recent Millennium Development Goals Report had encouraging news. An estimated 3.3 million deaths from malaria were averted between 2000 and 2012 due to the expansion of malaria interventions, and efforts to fight tuberculosis have saved an estimated 22 million lives since 1995. Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: New Accommodations For Employers On Contraceptive Coverage


August 22nd, 2014

On August 22, 2014, the Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor, and Treasury released an interim final  and a proposed  rule providing for the accommodation of religious objections on the part of an employer or institution of higher learning to providing their employees or students coverage for contraceptive services.  A fact sheet on the rules was also released,   as was a notice on the revision of the form used to collect information on religious objections to contraceptive coverage.

The proposed rule, which applies to for-profit entities, is being issued in response to the Supreme Court’s decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, which ruled that closely-held for-profit corporations may refuse to cover contraceptives for religious reasons.  The interim final rule responds to the Court’s interim order in Wheaton College v. Burwell  (and to 31 lower court injunctions) that released religious non-profit organizations from accommodations earlier proposed by HHS. Read the rest of this entry »

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