From The Staff

Interview: IOM President Harvey Fineberg Reflects On Lessons Learned


July 10th, 2014

On June 16, 2014, I spoke with Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg, as he wrapped up his second six-year term as president of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). We discussed how requests for work come to the IOM, the attributes of IOM reports that make them effective, and how the IOM maintains a strong voice in a crowded field.

Dr. Fineberg shared lessons learned from his analysis of events surrounding the Swine Flu immunization effort of 1976, and how, today, those lessons help him guide the IOM’s thinking about program assessment. We also discussed Dr. Fineberg’s work to bring together the various arms of the National Academies of Sciences to improve health.

You can listen to the full podcast at Health Affairs. These are a few of my favorite quotations taken from our discussion: Read the rest of this entry »

New Health Affairs July Issue: The Impact Of Big Data On Health Care


July 8th, 2014

Health Affairs explores the promise of big data in improving health care effectiveness and efficiency in its July issue. Many articles examine the potential of approaches such as predictive analytics and address the unavoidable privacy implications of collecting, storing, and interpreting massive amounts of health information.

Big data can yield big savings, if the data are used in the right ways.

David Bates of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and coauthors analyze six use cases with strong opportunities for cost savings: high-cost patients; readmissions; triage; decompensation (when a patient’s condition worsens); adverse events; and treatment optimization when a disease affects multiple organ systems. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Event Reminder: Using Big Data To Transform Care


July 7th, 2014

The application of big data to transform health care delivery, health research, and health policy is underway, and its potential is limitless.  The July 2014 issue of Health Affairs, “Using Big Data To Transform Care,” examines this new era for research and patient care from every angle.

You are invited to join Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil on Wednesday, July 9, for an event at the National Press Club, when the issue will be unveiled and authors will present their work.

WHEN:
Wednesday, July 9, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE:
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC, 13th Floor

REGISTER NOW

Twitter: Follow Live Tweets from the briefing @HA_Events, and join the conversation with #HA_BigData.

The full agenda is below.

Read the rest of this entry »

Happy Birthday HCPF


July 1st, 2014

Today marks the 20th birthday of the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing.  The story of its creation provides an important reminder of how our thinking about health care has evolved over the past few decades – and how it continues to evolve today.

Back in the bad old days, Medicaid was just another social service.  Housed within a broader social services agency, Colorado Medicaid – as was the case in most states – grew up with a typical welfare mentality.  Program enrollees were beneficiaries.  If they did not enroll, we assumed it meant they did not need or want our services.  Eligibility was a cumbersome, rule-bound process with inscrutable results and unintelligible notices to applicants of what was missing from their file. Read the rest of this entry »

Exhibit Of The Month: The Medicare Reimbursement Margin


June 30th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing “Exhibit of the Month” series. Readers who’d like to highlight other noteworthy exhibits from the same issue are encouraged to make their pitch in the comments section below.

This month we look at three exhibits from the June issue’s care span article, “Medicare Home Health Payment Reform May Jeopardize Access for Clinically Complex and Socially Vulnerable Patients,” published in the June issue of Health Affairs. Read the rest of this entry »

Call For Papers: Care Of Older Adults


June 27th, 2014

Health Affairs encourages submissions from authors on topics surrounding the care of older adults, including new models of care and the management of multiple chronic conditions among this population. We are interested in work that spans the full range of care settings, including primary care and specialty practices, hospitals, nursing homes and other long-term care settings.

In addition to exploring topics that are directly related to the provision of care, we also welcome papers on a broad array of related dimensions that affect care, access, and affordability, such as financing models, coverage, and size and composition of the workforce. We are grateful to The John A. Hartford Foundation for providing support for our ongoing coverage of these topics. Read the rest of this entry »

New Health Policy Brief: Risk Corridors


June 26th, 2014

The latest Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) describes the Affordable Care Act’s premium stabilization programs that encourage insurers to participate in the exchanges by eliminating some unpredictability around newly insured enrollees.

The ACA created health insurance Marketplaces and premium subsidies to make insurance more affordable, and the ACA completely changed the way insurance is priced and sold in the individual market. As of 2014, insurers (both those participating in the exchanges and those selling on the individual market outside the exchange) face a number of new restrictions. Read the rest of this entry »

The 2014 Culture of Health Prizes


June 25th, 2014

Today the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation awarded its 2014 Culture of Health Prize to six communities. These communities —  Brownsville, TexasBuncombe County, North CarolinaDurham County, North CarolinaSpokane County, WashingtonTaos Pueblo, New Mexico; and Williamson, West Virginia – were selected for the work they have done to place a high priority on health and bring partners together to drive local change. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Web First: Shifting Open Enrollment Could Increase Participation


June 25th, 2014

On November 15, state and federal health Marketplaces will open their portals and phone lines for the 2015 open enrollment season, which runs through next February 15. While the end of the year is traditionally “open season” for health insurance, a new study being released today as a Web First by Health Affairs, recommends shifting open enrollment to the period between February 15 and April 15.

The suggestion from authors Katherine Swartz, Harvard School of Public Health and John Graves, Vanderbilt University’s School of Medicine, is based on insights from psychology and behavioral economics, which indicate that people make better decisions when they are not stressed by financial worries — as they often are during the end-of-year holiday season. Read the rest of this entry »

Health Affairs Briefing: Using Big Data To Transform Care


June 23rd, 2014

The application of big data to transform health care delivery, health research, and health policy is underway, and its potential is limitless.  The July 2014 issue of Health Affairs, “Using Big Data To Transform Care,” examines this new era for research and patient care from every angle.

You are invited to join Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil on Wednesday, July 9, for an event at the National Press Club, when the issue will be unveiled and authors will present their work.

WHEN:
Wednesday, July 9, 2014
9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

WHERE:
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC, 13th Floor

REGISTER NOW

Twitter: Follow Live Tweets from the briefing @HA_Events, and join the conversation with #HA_BigData. Read the rest of this entry »

Contributing Voices

Better Measurement Of Maternity Care Quality


August 12th, 2014

A thought-provoking paper published this month in Health Affairs shows stunning variation in rates of obstetrical complications across U.S. hospitals. This type of research is important and necessary because focusing on averages masks potentially large differences in how patient care is provided and how clinical decisions are made.

From a policy perspective, it’s crucial to identify and learn from hospitals that are “positive deviants,” that is – hospitals with better-than-expected quality of care. From a pregnant woman’s perspective, having information on hospital rates of hemorrhage, infection, or laceration during childbirth is a high priority.

Authors Laurent Glance and colleagues add to a growing literature on variation in hospital-based maternity care. Having useful quality measurement and reporting strategies to guide policy and patient decisions is an essential next step. Indeed, Glance and colleagues conclude by urging clinicians and policymakers to “develop comprehensive quality metrics for obstetrical care and focus on improving obstetrical outcomes.” Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Medicare And The ACA Marketplaces (Updated)


August 12th, 2014

Editor’s note: This post was updated on August 12, 2014 to discuss steps by the federal government to resolve inconsistencies in immigration and citizenship status for some enrollees in qualified health plans offered in the federally facilitated marketplace, and on August 15 as reflected immediately below.

August 15, 2014 update: On August 13, 2014, CMS released Bulletin 11, which informs qualified health plan insurers in the individual market federally facilitated marketplace how to handle individuals who are determined not qualified to enroll in qualified health plans because of data matching issues.   If individuals from whom documentation has been requested to verify information on their applications fail to submit this documentation on time (by September 5), their eligibility will be determined based on information that CMS has available in trusted electronic data sources.  This may result in termination of qualified individual status if the issue is citizenship or lawful residence status, since an unlawful resident does not qualify for marketplace coverage.

In these cases, marketplace coverage will end on the last day of the month during which CMS determines that the individual is not qualified.  The individual will be directed to its QHP insurer to request coverage outside the marketplace without premium tax credits or cost-sharing reduction payments.  He or she will qualify for a special enrollment period based on loss of coverage or change in eligibility for premium tax credits.  The insurer is encouraged to work with the individual to avoid gaps in coverage and to credit any amounts paid toward deductibles or out-of-pocket limits for the individual’s coverage outside the marketplace.

If some members of an enrollment group remain eligible for coverage (for example, because one member of a family is determined ineligible but the remaining members are qualified), marketplace coverage should continue for the remaining family members.  Any amounts previously paid by the member who is removed should be credited toward the deductible and out-of-pocket limits of those members remaining.  If the members of the family that remain eligible do not qualify for the QHP in which they were enrolled, they must be given a special enrollment period to enroll in a QHP for which they are eligible.

If individuals are determined not to be qualified individuals because requested documentation was not received in a timely manner, they can reenroll with retroactive coverage within 60 days if they attest that they in fact submitted documentation on time and are in fact subsequently determined eligible.  They will not be penalized due to time lags in mailing or processing of documents.  If an individual does not submit documentation on time, but does so within 60 days after termination, and the individual is subsequently determined eligible, the individual will be given a special enrollment period to reenroll, although coverage will not resume until the first day of the month following plan selection.  The insurer is expected to apply any amounts previous paid toward the deductible and out-of-pocket limits of the coverage in which the individual enrolls during the special enrollment period.

Original post. On August 1, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released a set of frequently asked questions on the relationship between Medicare and the marketplaces. This is not the first guidance CMS has published on this topic, and much of the information in the FAQ was already available. The FAQ is also quite repetitive, as it answers the same questions under different headings, such as “general enrollment FAQs” and “consumer messaging,” but does contain useful information. This post briefly summarizes the FAQ.

The FAQ emphasizes the fact that Medicare and marketplaces operate independently, with little overlap. The marketplaces do not enroll individuals in Medicare or in Medicare Advantage plans and do not sell Medicare supplement plans. Indeed, exchanges cannot legally sell coverage to Medicare beneficiaries. Read the rest of this entry »

Mental Health Reform: Treating Before Stage 4


August 11th, 2014

When I talk about mental illnesses, I often point out that as a matter of public policy they are the only chronic conditions we wait until Stage 4 – the final stage in a chronic disease process – to treat, and then often only through incarceration.

To me, it is clear why this is the case. We have adopted a behavioral standard – danger to self or others – as a trigger to treatment.

But waiting until injury or death is imminent is no way to treat a chronic health condition. David Mechanic’s thoughtful Health Affairs article, “More People Than Ever Before Are Receiving Behavioral Health Care in the United States, But Gaps and Challenges Remain,” published in the recent August issue, examines the result of this Stage 4 thinking.

Beginning with “the devastating effects on the well-being of individuals, families, and communities,” Mechanic lays out the current state of mental health care in America. Mental illnesses rob individuals of both dignity and decades of life expectancy. Read the rest of this entry »

Implementing Health Reform: Transferring Information Among The Exchanges, The IRS, And Taxpayers


August 8th, 2014

For better or worse, Congress decided to use our tax system and the Internal Revenue Service to operationalize two of the most important features of the Affordable Care Act (ACA): the premium tax credits that make coverage affordable to many lower and moderate-income Americans, and the individual responsibility provision which ensures that healthy as well as unhealthy Americans obtain health coverage.

The tax credits are available to otherwise uninsured Americans with incomes between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level. For 2014, tax credits are being received by 85 percent of marketplace enrollees and are reducing their premiums in the federally-facilitated exchanges by 76 percent.

The individual mandate is enforced through a tax that will be imposed on Americans who do not have minimum essential coverage—such as employment-based coverage, individual coverage, or coverage through a government program—and who do not qualify for an exemption. For 2014, these individuals will owe a tax for each month that they lack minimum essential coverage of 1/12th of $95 per adult and $47.50 per child (up to $285 for a year) or 1 percent of their income above the tax filing limit up to the average annual cost of bronze plan ($2,448 per individual up to $12,240 for families of five or more).

In a recent post on Health Affairs Blog, Jon Kingsdale and Julia Lerche offered an excellent analysis of some of the difficulties that may be encountered during the 2014 tax filing season. In another post I described briefly recently released 2014 tax forms, as well as further guidance on tax matters. This post examines how tax reporting and filing will be handled in greater detail, and also discusses a federal appellate court decision rejecting a challenge to the Affordable Care Act. Read the rest of this entry »

An Evolutionary Approach To Advancing Quality Measurement


August 8th, 2014

Editor’s note: Mary Barton also coauthored this post. 

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission’s June report, like many current discussions on measuring quality in health care, focuses on the need for measures of overuse and outcomes.  The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) agrees and is committed to developing better measures for these important priorities.

NCQA’s Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS)®, a tool used by more than 90 percent of America’s health plans to measure performance, includes a readmissions outcome measure, intermediate outcome measures like blood pressure and blood sugar control for diabetics, and measures of relative resource use.

MedPAC suggests focusing on important resource use outcomes, including preventable admissions, emergency department visits, mortality, and readmissions, as well as healthy days at home. These are important for helping us understand the costs of care. Read the rest of this entry »

Having A Baby: Media Confusion Over Charges, Costs, And The Benefits Of Insurance


August 6th, 2014

Note: In addition to Marc Berk, Claudia Schur also coauthored this post. 

Recent discussion about the Affordable Care Act has intensified the media’s interest in the cost of medical care. While as health services researchers we are perhaps in the best position to provide information on complex health care topics, we may need to improve our ability to distill information into one minute sound bites.

A particularly interesting example of the disconnect between media reporting and a more nuanced analysis occurred earlier this year, on March 4, when NBC ran a story about the cost of having a baby. The story confused the very different concepts of what health care providers charge, what they are actually paid, and what consumers owe, and in so doing obscured one of the key benefits for consumers of being insured.

We were startled to hear that, according to NBC, the cost of having a baby has increased more than 300 percent in the past 10 years. According to the report, the cost of a vaginal delivery went from $7,700 to $32,000, while the cost of a cesarean birth went from $11,000 to $51,000. A small heading in the table presented by NBC cited Truven Analytics as the source of these data. Read the rest of this entry »

The Payment Reform Landscape: Accountable Care Organizations


August 5th, 2014

Note: In addition to Suzanne Delbanco, this post is also coauthored by David Lansky.

“The accountable care organization is like a unicorn, a fantastic creature that is vested with mythical powers. But no one has actually seen one,” said former California HealthCare Foundation CEO, Mark Smith, MD, in 2010. Over the last four years, we’ve certainly seen a proliferation of unicorns and we’re now reaching the point where fantasy—at least in a handful of cases—is becoming a reality.

A growing number of large employers are piloting accountable care organizations (ACOs), working through their health plan; in some cases they are doing so directly with provider systems, such as the new Boeing arrangement with Providence Health and Services, Swedish Health Services, and University of Washington Medicine and Intel’s contracting efforts in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Portland, Oregon. The large employers and other health care purchasers with whom we work — eager, if not desperate, for solutions to contain the costs of health care and improve its quality — are watching these first movers carefully to see if ACOs prove to be a viable strategy for improving population health and bending the cost trend.

These leading purchasers intend to set the bar high. They cannot make the investment to pursue these ACO relationships if they are not assured that their populations will see meaningful, measurable gains in their health care and its affordability, as well as their health. That often means contractual commitments to lowering total costs of care and showing improved patient outcomes for targeted populations — like high risk, medically complex patients. Our purchaser colleagues who have been among the early adopters of ACO arrangements have begun to identify the features critical to successful ACOs; these are the elements other purchasers will look for when deciding if it’s worth proceeding. Read the rest of this entry »

Bundled Payment: Learning From Our Failures


August 5th, 2014

Note: In addition to Tom Williams, Jill Yegian also coauthored this post. 

Seeing “IHA” and “Fails” together in the title of an article in the nation’s premier health policy journal was not an outcome that we anticipated when the bundled payment initiative described by M. Susan Ridgely et. al in the August issue of Health Affairs was launched.

The key objective of the Integrated Healthcare Association (IHA)’s initiative was to implement over 20 payer-provider bundled payment contracts, resulting in completion of more than 500 bundled cases within the first two years of the project. During the third year of the project, researchers were to conduct both a clinical and an economic evaluation to test how bundled payments affect the quality and cost of care, in conjunction with an implementation evaluation to determine the scalability of this approach.

Looking back, these targets seem highly optimistic; but at the pilot’s launch, both IHA and its stakeholders had a number of reasons to be confident. The pilot was well funded by a three-year grant from the Agency for Health Research and Quality (AHRQ), building on two rounds of planning and feasibility work over four years funded by the Blue Shield of California Foundation and the California HealthCare Foundation. In addition, there was a high level of interest and enthusiasm among a core group of providers and health plans that had a prior history of collaboration in a California physician pay for performance program. Read the rest of this entry »

Decoding 2015 Health Insurance Rate Increase Requests


August 4th, 2014

Note: In addition to Christopher Koller, Sabrina Corlette coauthored this post.

The rates are coming, the rates are coming.

While there seem to be fewer “latest verdicts on the ACA,” breathlessly reported in the popular press, as we move through the second half of 2014, the filing of 2015 rate requests for individual and small group products on the health insurance exchanges offer one more piece of catnip for pundits.

Who is up? Who is down? How much? Is this the dreaded death spiral for the ACA? Or its vindication?

As discussions and analysis of these increases are disseminated, it is important to remember the following points. Read the rest of this entry »

An Ounce Of Prevention For The ACA’s Second Open Enrollment


August 4th, 2014

Note: In addition to Jon Kingsdale, this post is coauthored by Julia Lerche.

Since recovering from its flawed rollout, the ACA has enjoyed a string of successes. By April, some eight million Americans managed to enroll; for 2015, some reluctant insurers, including the nation’s second largest (United), are jumping into the new ACA Marketplaces; and the New England Journal of Medicine recently published an analysis confirming the ACA’s significant reduction of the uninsured.

Approximately 87 percent of Marketplace enrollees claimed premium tax credits, of which an estimated 85 percent, or six million, actually paid premiums. (We assume a disenrollment rate of 3 percent per month since April 2014, which is conservative compared with the Massachusetts Health Connector’s experience and in line with the assumptions of several State-based Marketplaces.) Many of the original six million, plus more recent enrollees, will experience their second enrollment between November 15, 2014 and February 15, 2015. They will also file with the IRS for a premium tax credit as early as January 2015.

The two events in combination represent a huge risk. We hope the responsible agencies will act soon to mitigate the risks. Read the rest of this entry »

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