Tag Archives: Employer-Sponsored Insurance

The Marketplace Premiums Increase: Underwriting Cycle Or Death Spiral?

In this post, we aim to illuminate the underlying forces that led to dramatic increases in premiums so as to clarify the historical record and provide lessons for policymakers who aim to replace the ACA.

February 8, 2017

Even For Large Employers, The Future Of Delivery System Reform And Publicly Financed Coverage Matters

Large employers have a material interest in two major health reform issues: value-based payment and delivery reform and publicly financed coverage.

January 31, 2017

How We Can Repeal The ACA And Still Insure The Uninsured

Even if the ACA stays in place, there will still be almost 30 million people without health insurance. The initial goal of reform should be: making sure everyone has access to health insurance that is affordable and that gives them dependable access to medical care.

January 18, 2017

Get Health Insurance Through Your Employer? ACA Repeal Will Affect You, Too

Job-based plans offered to employees and their families cover 150 million people in the United States. If the ACA is repealed, they stand to lose critical consumer protections that many have come to expect of their employer plan.

January 11, 2017

A Portfolio Strategy For Affordable Coverage: Disaggregating Problems, Aggregating Solutions

Rather than placing all our bets on one theory of the case, we should be assembling and pursuing a balanced, diversified, and comprehensive portfolio of strategies.

November 18, 2016

Healthy Indiana 2.0 Is Challenging Medicaid Norms

The Healthy Indiana Plan was recognized as the most significant departure from traditional Medicaid ever approved by CMS, and ignited a national conversation about the implications of its consumer-driven design for able-bodied adults in Indiana and potentially other reform-minded states.

August 29, 2016

Fixing The ‘Family Glitch’ Will Boost Economic Security For Low-Income Families And Increase Marketplace Stability

Research published in the July issue of Health Affairs concludes that fixing the family glitch reduces family health spending but increases government costs. Reading beyond the headlines, however, we see other benefits---namely greater economic security for low-income families and increased...

July 27, 2016

About That Cadillac Tax

Congress delayed implementation of the Cadillac tax until 2020. There are two key practical issues with the tax that warrant continued caution: the indexing problem and the adaptation question.

April 25, 2016

Reform The ‘Cadillac Tax’ To Target Rich Benefits, Not High Costs

Some of the advocacy for the excise tax is misguided, but its marketing as a tax on luxury coverage states a principle that should be part of national health policy. It should be fixed so it applies to a clear definition of relatively luxurious benefits.

March 16, 2016

Don’t Let the Talking Points Fool You: It’s All About the Risk Pool

Deciding how much of total health care expenditures should be shared and how to share it is the fundamental conundrum of health care policy. How do the two parties address this conundrum and how would the parties' positions distribute costs by income and health status?

March 15, 2016